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Reviews

Reviews reviews 155 © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2004 JANER 4 Also available online – www.brill.nl REVIEWS Itamar Singer, Hittite Prayers . Writings from the Ancient World 11. Atlanta, GA: Society of Biblical Literature, 2002. xvi +141 The earliest Hittite prayers were primarily entreaties, apparently spo- ken by a priest/priestess, asking the gods for fairly general benefits for the king and queen (may the land thrive and prosper, the ruler have a long life, victory in battle, etc.). They do not appear to have been written in response to specific events nor are they linked to a specific individual. Although these were written sometime in Old Hittite times, they continued to be copied through late Hittite times. Beginning sometime after the suppression of the usurper Muwattalli I an entirely new sort of prayer appeared in which a named king or member of the royal family himself recited a prayer. These were con- sidered to be the ruler’s speech in a divine court of law. Here, he sought help from his divine lawyer in convincing his divine judges either via his innocence or his contrition that a specific problem or set of problems understood as divine punishment should be resolved http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions Brill

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2004 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1569-2116
eISSN
1569-2124
DOI
10.1163/1569212042653400
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

reviews 155 © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2004 JANER 4 Also available online – www.brill.nl REVIEWS Itamar Singer, Hittite Prayers . Writings from the Ancient World 11. Atlanta, GA: Society of Biblical Literature, 2002. xvi +141 The earliest Hittite prayers were primarily entreaties, apparently spo- ken by a priest/priestess, asking the gods for fairly general benefits for the king and queen (may the land thrive and prosper, the ruler have a long life, victory in battle, etc.). They do not appear to have been written in response to specific events nor are they linked to a specific individual. Although these were written sometime in Old Hittite times, they continued to be copied through late Hittite times. Beginning sometime after the suppression of the usurper Muwattalli I an entirely new sort of prayer appeared in which a named king or member of the royal family himself recited a prayer. These were con- sidered to be the ruler’s speech in a divine court of law. Here, he sought help from his divine lawyer in convincing his divine judges either via his innocence or his contrition that a specific problem or set of problems understood as divine punishment should be resolved

Journal

Journal of Ancient Near Eastern ReligionsBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2004

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