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Reply to Zahar

Reply to Zahar Alexander Zahar’s critique of our article and the ila principles raises some important issues. In the introduction, he reminds the reader that it is primarily people and their lifestyles that are responsible for climate change. Increasingly, their unsustainable way of living and consuming the Earth’s natural resources cannot be identified with national boundaries only, but also with individual wealth within different societies. All over the world affluent households have a carbon footprint that is much larger than that of their low-income peers, but it is the poor who already are, and will continue to be, most affected by the adverse effects of climate change. Today, many of the world’s largest economic entities (and co 2 emitters) are also corporations whose revenues dwarf the gdp of many low- and middle-income countries. Their political clout and influence on the international plane can marginalize nation states. Against that backdrop, the state as an organizational unit, and the traditional model of interstate law and policy making, may well be out-dated and incapable of successfully addressing climate change. But this is all that there currently is, and, at least for the time being, it is still states that create and enforce the rules http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Climate Law Brill

Reply to Zahar

Climate Law , Volume 4 (3-4): 234 – Feb 23, 2014

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2015 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
Subject
Articles
ISSN
1878-6553
eISSN
1878-6561
DOI
10.1163/18786561-00404003
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Alexander Zahar’s critique of our article and the ila principles raises some important issues. In the introduction, he reminds the reader that it is primarily people and their lifestyles that are responsible for climate change. Increasingly, their unsustainable way of living and consuming the Earth’s natural resources cannot be identified with national boundaries only, but also with individual wealth within different societies. All over the world affluent households have a carbon footprint that is much larger than that of their low-income peers, but it is the poor who already are, and will continue to be, most affected by the adverse effects of climate change. Today, many of the world’s largest economic entities (and co 2 emitters) are also corporations whose revenues dwarf the gdp of many low- and middle-income countries. Their political clout and influence on the international plane can marginalize nation states. Against that backdrop, the state as an organizational unit, and the traditional model of interstate law and policy making, may well be out-dated and incapable of successfully addressing climate change. But this is all that there currently is, and, at least for the time being, it is still states that create and enforce the rules

Journal

Climate LawBrill

Published: Feb 23, 2014

There are no references for this article.