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People and Animals in Holocene Africa: Recent Advances in Archaeozoology. By H. Jousse & J. Lesur (eds.). Reports in African Archaeology 2. Africa Magna Verlag, Frankfurt am Main, 2011, 142 pp. ISBN 978-3-937248-27-1. € 49.80 (Paperback).

People and Animals in Holocene Africa: Recent Advances in Archaeozoology. By H. Jousse & J. Lesur... Book Review The development of food production is a widely discussed topic in the archaeological literature on the Holocene in Africa. Over the last decade, research has firmly established that Africa has had a highly distinctive pathway to food production compared with other regions (reviewed in MaRshall & hildeBRand 2002; GiffoRd-Gonzalez 2005). Herding economies based on animal domestication had appeared in northern Africa during the early Holocene and had flourished across the continent for thousands of years before the emergence of domesticated plants, farming societies, and urbanism. Early herders had continued to depend extensively on the rich wild fauna of Africa and to coexist with groups of hunters-gatherers, although this pattern varied greatly both geographically and temporally. The African context of food production, previously described as patchy, has been recently recognized more aptly as eco-diverse (MaRshall 2007). It is precisely this eco-diversity, underlying subsistence systems of Holocene Africa, which constitutes the focus of the volume reviewed here. The volume was jointly edited by Hélène Jousse and Joséphine Lesur, both of the Muséum national d'Histoire naturelle in Paris, France. It is one of a series of proceedings volumes of the most recent conference of the International Council of Zooarchaeology http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of African Archaeology Brill

People and Animals in Holocene Africa: Recent Advances in Archaeozoology. By H. Jousse & J. Lesur (eds.). Reports in African Archaeology 2. Africa Magna Verlag, Frankfurt am Main, 2011, 142 pp. ISBN 978-3-937248-27-1. € 49.80 (Paperback).

Journal of African Archaeology , Volume 10 (2): 227 – Oct 25, 2012

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© Copyright 2012 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1612-1651
eISSN
2191-5784
DOI
10.3213/2191-5784-10215
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Book Review The development of food production is a widely discussed topic in the archaeological literature on the Holocene in Africa. Over the last decade, research has firmly established that Africa has had a highly distinctive pathway to food production compared with other regions (reviewed in MaRshall & hildeBRand 2002; GiffoRd-Gonzalez 2005). Herding economies based on animal domestication had appeared in northern Africa during the early Holocene and had flourished across the continent for thousands of years before the emergence of domesticated plants, farming societies, and urbanism. Early herders had continued to depend extensively on the rich wild fauna of Africa and to coexist with groups of hunters-gatherers, although this pattern varied greatly both geographically and temporally. The African context of food production, previously described as patchy, has been recently recognized more aptly as eco-diverse (MaRshall 2007). It is precisely this eco-diversity, underlying subsistence systems of Holocene Africa, which constitutes the focus of the volume reviewed here. The volume was jointly edited by Hélène Jousse and Joséphine Lesur, both of the Muséum national d'Histoire naturelle in Paris, France. It is one of a series of proceedings volumes of the most recent conference of the International Council of Zooarchaeology

Journal

Journal of African ArchaeologyBrill

Published: Oct 25, 2012

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