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On the Epitaph for Argotas from Neapolis Scythica

On the Epitaph for Argotas from Neapolis Scythica AbstractThis article contains a re-publication of a verse epitaph found in Neapolis Scythica (SEG 53, 775). After correcting a number of readings and restorations of the editio princeps, the author demonstrates that lines 4-8 contain a description of the deceased Argotas and not of King Skiluros, as the scholars publishing the inscription had suggested. There are no grounds for treating the φιλο[φροσύνη] Ἑλλάνων mentioned in the text as evidence of Argotas’ Greek origin. Thus there is no reason for viewing him as a figure similar to Posideos, son of Posideos, known to us from Neapolis epigraphy. The man buried here was a representative of the Scythian nobility, who could be probably identified as the husband of the Bosporan queen Kamasarya mentioned in one of the inscriptions found in Pantikapaion (CIRB 75). http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ancient Civilizations from Scythia to Siberia Brill

On the Epitaph for Argotas from Neapolis Scythica

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0929-077X
eISSN
1570-0577
DOI
10.1163/15700577-12341350
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractThis article contains a re-publication of a verse epitaph found in Neapolis Scythica (SEG 53, 775). After correcting a number of readings and restorations of the editio princeps, the author demonstrates that lines 4-8 contain a description of the deceased Argotas and not of King Skiluros, as the scholars publishing the inscription had suggested. There are no grounds for treating the φιλο[φροσύνη] Ἑλλάνων mentioned in the text as evidence of Argotas’ Greek origin. Thus there is no reason for viewing him as a figure similar to Posideos, son of Posideos, known to us from Neapolis epigraphy. The man buried here was a representative of the Scythian nobility, who could be probably identified as the husband of the Bosporan queen Kamasarya mentioned in one of the inscriptions found in Pantikapaion (CIRB 75).

Journal

Ancient Civilizations from Scythia to SiberiaBrill

Published: Dec 9, 2019

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