Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Late Judeo-Aramaic: The Language of Theosophic Kabbalah

Late Judeo-Aramaic: The Language of Theosophic Kabbalah ARAMAIC STUDIES Vol 4.1 (2006): 21-33 © 2006 Sage Publications (London, Thousand Oaks, CA, and New Delhi) DOI: 10.1177/1477835106066033 http://as.sagepub.com Late Judeo-Aramaic: The Language of Theosophic Kabbalah * C HARLES M OPSIK (translated by Ariel Klein) 51 Hollycroft Avenue, London NW3 7QJ Abstract From Antiquity to the modern era, Aramaic co-existed with Hebrew as a language of Jewish literary production, and for certain types of writing, especially on topics associated with a degree of esotericism such as magic, prophetic revelation and mystical speculation, it often asserted itself as the preferred language long after Aramaic had ceased to function as a spoken vernacular. This article considers the possible reasons for this preference. It focuses on the Zohar , which established Aramaic as the language of theoso- phical mysticism in thirteenth-century Castile, and traces the linguistic impact of this work on subsequent schools of Kabbalah. Keywords: Mopsik, Aramaic, Kabbalah, Zohar , Jewish Mysticism, Theosophy While the oldest inscriptions discovered in Syria testify to the existence of Aramaic dating back to 700 BCE , this language was, from biblical times, the lingua franca of the Near East up until it was supplanted by Greek. The Hebrews of the biblical era were http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aramaic Studies Brill

Late Judeo-Aramaic: The Language of Theosophic Kabbalah

Aramaic Studies , Volume 4 (1): 21 – Jan 1, 2006

Loading next page...
 
/lp/brill/late-judeo-aramaic-the-language-of-theosophic-kabbalah-ZxkNzvvCf2

References

References for this paper are not available at this time. We will be adding them shortly, thank you for your patience.

Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2006 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1477-8351
eISSN
1745-5227
DOI
10.1177/1477835106066033
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ARAMAIC STUDIES Vol 4.1 (2006): 21-33 © 2006 Sage Publications (London, Thousand Oaks, CA, and New Delhi) DOI: 10.1177/1477835106066033 http://as.sagepub.com Late Judeo-Aramaic: The Language of Theosophic Kabbalah * C HARLES M OPSIK (translated by Ariel Klein) 51 Hollycroft Avenue, London NW3 7QJ Abstract From Antiquity to the modern era, Aramaic co-existed with Hebrew as a language of Jewish literary production, and for certain types of writing, especially on topics associated with a degree of esotericism such as magic, prophetic revelation and mystical speculation, it often asserted itself as the preferred language long after Aramaic had ceased to function as a spoken vernacular. This article considers the possible reasons for this preference. It focuses on the Zohar , which established Aramaic as the language of theoso- phical mysticism in thirteenth-century Castile, and traces the linguistic impact of this work on subsequent schools of Kabbalah. Keywords: Mopsik, Aramaic, Kabbalah, Zohar , Jewish Mysticism, Theosophy While the oldest inscriptions discovered in Syria testify to the existence of Aramaic dating back to 700 BCE , this language was, from biblical times, the lingua franca of the Near East up until it was supplanted by Greek. The Hebrews of the biblical era were

Journal

Aramaic StudiesBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2006

Keywords: ARAMAIC; THEOSOPHY; JEWISH MYSTICISM; KABBALAH; ZOHAR; MOPSIK

There are no references for this article.