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Lament and Ritual Weeping in the “Negative Confession” of the Babylonian Akītu Festival

Lament and Ritual Weeping in the “Negative Confession” of the Babylonian Akītu Festival AbstractThis study seeks to contextualise the king’s “negative confession,” which took place in the spring Akītu Festival of Babylon, within the established norms of Mesopotamian ritual practice. The king’s humiliation is situated within the contexts of status reversal, lament and ritual weeping. The study includes a comparative almanac of the Akkadian prayer and/or exclamation known as šigû. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions Brill

Lament and Ritual Weeping in the “Negative Confession” of the Babylonian Akītu Festival

Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions , Volume 21 (1): 33 – Sep 6, 2021

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1569-2116
eISSN
1569-2124
DOI
10.1163/15692124-12341318
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractThis study seeks to contextualise the king’s “negative confession,” which took place in the spring Akītu Festival of Babylon, within the established norms of Mesopotamian ritual practice. The king’s humiliation is situated within the contexts of status reversal, lament and ritual weeping. The study includes a comparative almanac of the Akkadian prayer and/or exclamation known as šigû.

Journal

Journal of Ancient Near Eastern ReligionsBrill

Published: Sep 6, 2021

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