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KUL-OBA STUDIES PART I. THE KUL-OBA BURIAL-MOUND

KUL-OBA STUDIES PART I. THE KUL-OBA BURIAL-MOUND KUL-OBA STUDIES PART I. THE KUL-OBA BURIAL-MOUND (Questions of Historical and Archaeological Interpretation) * N.L. GRACH The Kul-Oba burial-mound is among the best-known and most popular sites of Graeco-Scythian culture in the Northern Pontic Region. This royal burial- mound containing a group burial of a Scythian type was discovered in 1830 six kilometres west of Kerch, which in ancient times had been the capital of the Bosporan Kingdom — Panticapaeum. This event immediately attracted close attention from the people of the day — scholars, artists, art connoisseurs and, naturally, representatives of state power. This occurred not merely because of the extraordinary wealth and abundance of the articles made of precious metals that had been found in the burial-mound, but also because of the artistic qualities of many of the articles. The Kul-Oba pendants with Ž ligree work and the high-relief head of Athena-Parthenos, the gold plate in the shape of a deer, the electrum vase with depictions of Scythians, silver vessels with exquisitely worked scenes of Ž ghting animals and many other masterpieces of ancient masters from this burial-mound are constantly used to decorate the pages of the most diverse publications on the history of world art and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ancient Civilizations from Scythia to Siberia Brill

KUL-OBA STUDIES PART I. THE KUL-OBA BURIAL-MOUND

Ancient Civilizations from Scythia to Siberia , Volume 7 (1-2): 5 – Jan 1, 2001

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2001 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0929-077X
eISSN
1570-0577
DOI
10.1163/157005701753359778
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

KUL-OBA STUDIES PART I. THE KUL-OBA BURIAL-MOUND (Questions of Historical and Archaeological Interpretation) * N.L. GRACH The Kul-Oba burial-mound is among the best-known and most popular sites of Graeco-Scythian culture in the Northern Pontic Region. This royal burial- mound containing a group burial of a Scythian type was discovered in 1830 six kilometres west of Kerch, which in ancient times had been the capital of the Bosporan Kingdom — Panticapaeum. This event immediately attracted close attention from the people of the day — scholars, artists, art connoisseurs and, naturally, representatives of state power. This occurred not merely because of the extraordinary wealth and abundance of the articles made of precious metals that had been found in the burial-mound, but also because of the artistic qualities of many of the articles. The Kul-Oba pendants with Ž ligree work and the high-relief head of Athena-Parthenos, the gold plate in the shape of a deer, the electrum vase with depictions of Scythians, silver vessels with exquisitely worked scenes of Ž ghting animals and many other masterpieces of ancient masters from this burial-mound are constantly used to decorate the pages of the most diverse publications on the history of world art and

Journal

Ancient Civilizations from Scythia to SiberiaBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2001

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