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Introduction to the Special Issue: Climate Engineering Law

Introduction to the Special Issue: Climate Engineering Law At the time of the publication of this volume, all eyes are turned towards Paris and the unfccc ’s cop 21 in anticipation of a new agreement to address climate change. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that this agreement will not constitute a magic bullet. Global average temperatures are projected to increase by 2.6°C by 2100 and reach 3.5°C above pre-industrial levels after 2100, even if the most optimistic outcomes from the conference are realized. The seriousness of temperature increases of this magnitude lies behind the impetus for increasing discussion of a suite of technological options designed to exert dramatic effects on the globe’s environment. These options are known collectively as climate engineering. Largely out of desperation and despair, climate engineering has moved from the realm of taboo to one more policy prescription. Yet, as all of the articles in this issue emphasize, it is a policy prescription not to be embraced lightly given the profound implications that it could pose for human institutions and natural ecosystems. Climate engineering technologies are generally divided into two categories: solar radiation management ( srm ) approaches, which focus on ‘reducing the amount of solar radiation absorbed by Earth by an http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Climate Law Brill

Introduction to the Special Issue: Climate Engineering Law

Climate Law , Volume 5 (2-4): 105 – Oct 26, 2015

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2015 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
Subject
Articles
ISSN
1878-6553
eISSN
1878-6561
DOI
10.1163/18786561-00504001
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

At the time of the publication of this volume, all eyes are turned towards Paris and the unfccc ’s cop 21 in anticipation of a new agreement to address climate change. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that this agreement will not constitute a magic bullet. Global average temperatures are projected to increase by 2.6°C by 2100 and reach 3.5°C above pre-industrial levels after 2100, even if the most optimistic outcomes from the conference are realized. The seriousness of temperature increases of this magnitude lies behind the impetus for increasing discussion of a suite of technological options designed to exert dramatic effects on the globe’s environment. These options are known collectively as climate engineering. Largely out of desperation and despair, climate engineering has moved from the realm of taboo to one more policy prescription. Yet, as all of the articles in this issue emphasize, it is a policy prescription not to be embraced lightly given the profound implications that it could pose for human institutions and natural ecosystems. Climate engineering technologies are generally divided into two categories: solar radiation management ( srm ) approaches, which focus on ‘reducing the amount of solar radiation absorbed by Earth by an

Journal

Climate LawBrill

Published: Oct 26, 2015

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