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International environmental law: Status, problems, and reform prospects

International environmental law: Status, problems, and reform prospects Climate Law 3 (2012) 71­91 DOI 10.3233/CL-2012-057 IOS Press Review essay Paul Anderson* Research Handbook on International Environmental Law, edited by Malgosia Fitzmaurice, David M. Ong, and Panos Merkouris. Cheltenham: Edward Elgar, 2010, 703 pp. (incl. index), ISBN 978-1-84720124-9. I. Introduction It has become almost a truism to say that we are witnessing environmental change at a rate higher than at any time in human history largely as the unintended and cumulative result of economic activity. With most induced environmental changes occurring faster than international efforts are mobilising to prevent them, there is mounting realization that international efforts appear largely ineffective. Complicating the need to subject such efforts to adequate reform are differences in views on the reasons for their ineffectiveness and on proposed remedies. These differences relate, on the one hand, to the proper focus of coordination, given the complex causal nature of the reported problem. On the other hand, they concern the proper normative terms of coordination, given the pervasive asymmetries in the causal responsibility for, deleterious consequences from, and adaptive capacity to global environmental changes (GEC). Resolving the two sets of differences requires, first, that we clarify the proper context of coordination, at the heart http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Climate Law Brill

International environmental law: Status, problems, and reform prospects

Climate Law , Volume 3 (1): 71 – Jan 1, 2012

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright 2012 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1878-6553
eISSN
1878-6561
DOI
10.1163/CL-2012-057
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Climate Law 3 (2012) 71­91 DOI 10.3233/CL-2012-057 IOS Press Review essay Paul Anderson* Research Handbook on International Environmental Law, edited by Malgosia Fitzmaurice, David M. Ong, and Panos Merkouris. Cheltenham: Edward Elgar, 2010, 703 pp. (incl. index), ISBN 978-1-84720124-9. I. Introduction It has become almost a truism to say that we are witnessing environmental change at a rate higher than at any time in human history largely as the unintended and cumulative result of economic activity. With most induced environmental changes occurring faster than international efforts are mobilising to prevent them, there is mounting realization that international efforts appear largely ineffective. Complicating the need to subject such efforts to adequate reform are differences in views on the reasons for their ineffectiveness and on proposed remedies. These differences relate, on the one hand, to the proper focus of coordination, given the complex causal nature of the reported problem. On the other hand, they concern the proper normative terms of coordination, given the pervasive asymmetries in the causal responsibility for, deleterious consequences from, and adaptive capacity to global environmental changes (GEC). Resolving the two sets of differences requires, first, that we clarify the proper context of coordination, at the heart

Journal

Climate LawBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2012

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