Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Infodemic in the era of the pandemic

Infodemic in the era of the pandemic AbstractThe COVID-19 pandemic has not only brought considerable challenges to public health, but also diffusions of fake news on social media platforms, taking on the moniker of “infodemic”. To have a better understanding of the infodemic, this research takes 580 pandemic-related fake news stories from two Taiwanese fact-checking platforms and 180,000 real news articles from four major newspapers in Taiwan spanning from January 2020 to August 2021. The paper presents lexical usages and discourses of fake news from the perspective of corpus-assisted discourse study. Keyword comparison and collocational network analysis are adopted as the major analytic framework to identify keyness keywords and to uncover the discourses embedded in COVID-19 fake news. Results suggest that pandemic-related fake news tend to emphasize the themes of virus, vaccine, and immunity regarding the content keywords. Personal pronouns that differentiate us and them, conjunctions used to construct causal explanations, time-frames that denote a confirmed social fact in false stories are also prominent lexical usages in COVID-19 fake news. Notably, verbs related to promoting action and expressions of polite requests are often fabricated in fake news messages. Collocational network reveals five main themes in pandemic-related fake news: virus, vaccine and vaccination, symptom, food and drink, caution and warning and mask wearing. This paper concludes that more than simply differentiating between true and false, fake news involve miscellaneous discursive constructions of existing political, social, and cultural dimensions within alternative and unverified reality. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Review of Pragmatics Brill

Infodemic in the era of the pandemic

International Review of Pragmatics , Volume 15 (2): 32 – Jul 11, 2023

Loading next page...
 
/lp/brill/infodemic-in-the-era-of-the-pandemic-zyKIGoJ162

References (43)

Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1877-3095
eISSN
1877-3109
DOI
10.1163/18773109-01502003
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractThe COVID-19 pandemic has not only brought considerable challenges to public health, but also diffusions of fake news on social media platforms, taking on the moniker of “infodemic”. To have a better understanding of the infodemic, this research takes 580 pandemic-related fake news stories from two Taiwanese fact-checking platforms and 180,000 real news articles from four major newspapers in Taiwan spanning from January 2020 to August 2021. The paper presents lexical usages and discourses of fake news from the perspective of corpus-assisted discourse study. Keyword comparison and collocational network analysis are adopted as the major analytic framework to identify keyness keywords and to uncover the discourses embedded in COVID-19 fake news. Results suggest that pandemic-related fake news tend to emphasize the themes of virus, vaccine, and immunity regarding the content keywords. Personal pronouns that differentiate us and them, conjunctions used to construct causal explanations, time-frames that denote a confirmed social fact in false stories are also prominent lexical usages in COVID-19 fake news. Notably, verbs related to promoting action and expressions of polite requests are often fabricated in fake news messages. Collocational network reveals five main themes in pandemic-related fake news: virus, vaccine and vaccination, symptom, food and drink, caution and warning and mask wearing. This paper concludes that more than simply differentiating between true and false, fake news involve miscellaneous discursive constructions of existing political, social, and cultural dimensions within alternative and unverified reality.

Journal

International Review of PragmaticsBrill

Published: Jul 11, 2023

There are no references for this article.