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Hyperboreans: Myth and History in Celtic-Hellenic Contacts

Hyperboreans: Myth and History in Celtic-Hellenic Contacts Book Reviews / Ancient Civilizations from Scythia to Siberia 13 (2007) 285-296 289 Timothy P. Bridgman, Hyperboreans : Myth and History in Celtic-Hellenic Contacts. New York and London, Routledge , 2005. XX+249 pages. ISBN 0-415-96978-6. A prominent academic has recently suggested that certain authors deliberately use the word ‘Celtic’ in the titles of their books in order to boost sales. 1 Th is is not the case of this neatly produced volume which is an update of a Ph.D. dissertation submitted in Trinity College Dublin in 2000. It goes without saying that the School of Classics at TCD is an important centre of Hellenic studies: Professor Brian McGing, who supervised the original disserta- tion, as well as Professors George L. Huxley and John M. Dillon acknowledged in the book (p. xv), are undeniably leading experts in the field. On the Celtic side lies the very fact that the dissertation was written (at least partially) in a “Celtic land”, which has a most impres- sive library to facilitate this kind of research. Moreover, the term “Celtic” – judging by the Index to the book (p. 239-240) – occurs more than on fifty pages of the publication, which itself consists http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ancient Civilizations from Scythia to Siberia Brill

Hyperboreans: Myth and History in Celtic-Hellenic Contacts

Ancient Civilizations from Scythia to Siberia , Volume 13 (3-4): 289 – Jan 1, 2007

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2007 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0929-077X
eISSN
1570-0577
DOI
10.1163/092907707X255827
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Book Reviews / Ancient Civilizations from Scythia to Siberia 13 (2007) 285-296 289 Timothy P. Bridgman, Hyperboreans : Myth and History in Celtic-Hellenic Contacts. New York and London, Routledge , 2005. XX+249 pages. ISBN 0-415-96978-6. A prominent academic has recently suggested that certain authors deliberately use the word ‘Celtic’ in the titles of their books in order to boost sales. 1 Th is is not the case of this neatly produced volume which is an update of a Ph.D. dissertation submitted in Trinity College Dublin in 2000. It goes without saying that the School of Classics at TCD is an important centre of Hellenic studies: Professor Brian McGing, who supervised the original disserta- tion, as well as Professors George L. Huxley and John M. Dillon acknowledged in the book (p. xv), are undeniably leading experts in the field. On the Celtic side lies the very fact that the dissertation was written (at least partially) in a “Celtic land”, which has a most impres- sive library to facilitate this kind of research. Moreover, the term “Celtic” – judging by the Index to the book (p. 239-240) – occurs more than on fifty pages of the publication, which itself consists

Journal

Ancient Civilizations from Scythia to SiberiaBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2007

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