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Harris, D., Origins of Agriculture in Western Central Asia. An Environmental-Archaeological Study . Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania Press, 2010, XVI+304 p., 8 color plates, ISBN 978-1-934536-16-2.

Harris, D., Origins of Agriculture in Western Central Asia. An Environmental-Archaeological Study... The development of sedentary agricultural societies in Central Asia, and the degree to which it represents indigenous processes or external stimuli, has long been a topic of debate. 1 One of the focal points of the discussion is the site of Jeitun in southern Turkmenistan, the type site for the ‘Jeitun Culture’, where documented evidence of sedentary Neolithic occupation occurs by the end of the 7 th millennium B.C. The book reviewed here, published in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, presents research conducted from 1989 to 1998 both at Jeitun and at rockshelters in the Bolshoi Balkhan massif, east of the Caspian Sea. This research serves as the focus of a much broader and multi-disciplinary enquiry into agricultural beginnings in Turkmenistan and, more broadly, western Central Asia. The narrative style is intensive but readable, a difficult balance given the amount of data that is included from very different disciplines; and a large and comprehensive set of appendices is very helpful. In terms of structure, the book is divided into five sections which follow an overarching theme of environmental archaeology. The first, comprising chapters 1 through 4, lays out past and present physical environments and ecology. Chapter 1, in addition to providing http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ancient Civilizations from Scythia to Siberia Brill

Harris, D., Origins of Agriculture in Western Central Asia. An Environmental-Archaeological Study . Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania Press, 2010, XVI+304 p., 8 color plates, ISBN 978-1-934536-16-2.

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
Subject
Book Reviews
ISSN
0929-077X
eISSN
1570-0577
DOI
10.1163/157005712X638690
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The development of sedentary agricultural societies in Central Asia, and the degree to which it represents indigenous processes or external stimuli, has long been a topic of debate. 1 One of the focal points of the discussion is the site of Jeitun in southern Turkmenistan, the type site for the ‘Jeitun Culture’, where documented evidence of sedentary Neolithic occupation occurs by the end of the 7 th millennium B.C. The book reviewed here, published in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, presents research conducted from 1989 to 1998 both at Jeitun and at rockshelters in the Bolshoi Balkhan massif, east of the Caspian Sea. This research serves as the focus of a much broader and multi-disciplinary enquiry into agricultural beginnings in Turkmenistan and, more broadly, western Central Asia. The narrative style is intensive but readable, a difficult balance given the amount of data that is included from very different disciplines; and a large and comprehensive set of appendices is very helpful. In terms of structure, the book is divided into five sections which follow an overarching theme of environmental archaeology. The first, comprising chapters 1 through 4, lays out past and present physical environments and ecology. Chapter 1, in addition to providing

Journal

Ancient Civilizations from Scythia to SiberiaBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2012

References