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GLASS HOUSES UNDER THE ROCKS: A REPLY TO WATSON

GLASS HOUSES UNDER THE ROCKS: A REPLY TO WATSON Ann B. Stahl In late June 1986, I was enjoying a pint with several faculty and postgraduate students after presenting a seminar at the Cambridge Department of Archaeology. The seminar, entitled "The advent of food production in West Africa: reconsidering processes of culture change" was based on my recently completed doctoral dissertation which focused on what I then termed the Kintampo culture (contrary to Watson p. 4, both ANQUANDAH [1993] and I [STAHL 1993] referred to this as the Kintampo complex by the time of the Southampton World Congress in 1986). During the course of conversation, someone asked why American scholars so often frame research in relation to "straw man" arguments. Today (having recently celebrated the half century mark) the details of the conversation have dimmed; however, the comment stuck with me over the years. At the time I thought I had been careful to avoid caricaturing the arguments of others to highlight the points I wished to make, but that Cambridge pub conversation convinced me to pay closer attention. I was transported back to that pub as I read Derek Watson's "Under the Rocks: Reconsidering the Origin of the Kintampo Tradition and the Development of Food Production http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of African Archaeology Brill

GLASS HOUSES UNDER THE ROCKS: A REPLY TO WATSON

Journal of African Archaeology , Volume 3 (1): 57 – Oct 25, 2005

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© Copyright 2005 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1612-1651
eISSN
2191-5784
DOI
10.3213/1612-1651-10036
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Ann B. Stahl In late June 1986, I was enjoying a pint with several faculty and postgraduate students after presenting a seminar at the Cambridge Department of Archaeology. The seminar, entitled "The advent of food production in West Africa: reconsidering processes of culture change" was based on my recently completed doctoral dissertation which focused on what I then termed the Kintampo culture (contrary to Watson p. 4, both ANQUANDAH [1993] and I [STAHL 1993] referred to this as the Kintampo complex by the time of the Southampton World Congress in 1986). During the course of conversation, someone asked why American scholars so often frame research in relation to "straw man" arguments. Today (having recently celebrated the half century mark) the details of the conversation have dimmed; however, the comment stuck with me over the years. At the time I thought I had been careful to avoid caricaturing the arguments of others to highlight the points I wished to make, but that Cambridge pub conversation convinced me to pay closer attention. I was transported back to that pub as I read Derek Watson's "Under the Rocks: Reconsidering the Origin of the Kintampo Tradition and the Development of Food Production

Journal

Journal of African ArchaeologyBrill

Published: Oct 25, 2005

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