Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

EXCAVATIONS AT WALALDÉ: NEW LIGHT ON THE SETTLEMENT OF THE MIDDLE SENEGAL VALLEY BY IRON-USING PEOPLES

EXCAVATIONS AT WALALDÉ: NEW LIGHT ON THE SETTLEMENT OF THE MIDDLE SENEGAL VALLEY BY IRON-USING... Excavation of the five hectare site of Walaldé revealed an occupation by iron-using agropastoralists that began (800–550) cal BC, and continued until (400–200) cal BC. The earliest occupation phase appears to document a period of transitional iron use, with some worked stone in evidence. Smelting and forging slags and tuyeres are present in considerable quantities in the later phase. Copper with the distinctive chemical signature of the Akjoujt mines in Mauritania was also present after 550 cal BC, attesting to trade and interaction over long distances. Other important aspects of the Walaldé sequence include ceramic materials and a series of red ochre burials. Possible cultural affinities with shell midden sites in the Senegal Delta, surface material from the Lac Rkiz region, and pastoralist sites of the ‘Boudhida Culture’ around Nouakchott are discussed. The article concludes with a consideration of Walaldé’s significance to the debate over the origins of iron metallurgy in West Africa. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of African Archaeology Brill

EXCAVATIONS AT WALALDÉ: NEW LIGHT ON THE SETTLEMENT OF THE MIDDLE SENEGAL VALLEY BY IRON-USING PEOPLES

Loading next page...
 
/lp/brill/excavations-at-walald-new-light-on-the-settlement-of-the-middle-e60js9gWKJ
Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© Copyright 2006 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1612-1651
eISSN
2191-5784
DOI
10.3213/1612-1651-10078
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Excavation of the five hectare site of Walaldé revealed an occupation by iron-using agropastoralists that began (800–550) cal BC, and continued until (400–200) cal BC. The earliest occupation phase appears to document a period of transitional iron use, with some worked stone in evidence. Smelting and forging slags and tuyeres are present in considerable quantities in the later phase. Copper with the distinctive chemical signature of the Akjoujt mines in Mauritania was also present after 550 cal BC, attesting to trade and interaction over long distances. Other important aspects of the Walaldé sequence include ceramic materials and a series of red ochre burials. Possible cultural affinities with shell midden sites in the Senegal Delta, surface material from the Lac Rkiz region, and pastoralist sites of the ‘Boudhida Culture’ around Nouakchott are discussed. The article concludes with a consideration of Walaldé’s significance to the debate over the origins of iron metallurgy in West Africa.

Journal

Journal of African ArchaeologyBrill

Published: Oct 25, 2006

Keywords: Early Iron Age; transition to iron; copper; agropastoralists; red ochre burial

There are no references for this article.