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“Editorial”

“Editorial” Americans traditionally have had high expectations for China to provide leadership in both East Asian and global affairs. Indeed, on 29 May 1942, President Franklin D. Roosevelt told Soviet Foreign Minister Vyacheslav Molotov “that he visualized the enforced disarmament of our enemies and, indeed, some of our friends after the war; that he thought that the United States, England, Russia and perhaps China should police the world and enforce disarmament by inspection.”1By the fall of 1943, Roosevelt, anticipating Allied victory in World War ii in the near future, arranged for meetings at Cairo with British Prime Minister Winston Churchill and Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek and at Teheran with Churchill and Soviet Premier Joseph Stalin to reach agreement on his plan for the “Four Policeman” to ensure postwar peace and stability. Already aware that after the war China likely would be weak because of wartime devastation and internal political divisions, the president, after his interaction with Chiang at Cairo, then lost all confidence in its ability to be an Asian policeman. However, China would reemerge as a united and strong nation after World War ii, but it would be under a Communist government. Mao Zedong declared that establishment of the People’s http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of American-East Asian Relations Brill

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1058-3947
eISSN
1876-5610
DOI
10.1163/18765610-02501001
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Americans traditionally have had high expectations for China to provide leadership in both East Asian and global affairs. Indeed, on 29 May 1942, President Franklin D. Roosevelt told Soviet Foreign Minister Vyacheslav Molotov “that he visualized the enforced disarmament of our enemies and, indeed, some of our friends after the war; that he thought that the United States, England, Russia and perhaps China should police the world and enforce disarmament by inspection.”1By the fall of 1943, Roosevelt, anticipating Allied victory in World War ii in the near future, arranged for meetings at Cairo with British Prime Minister Winston Churchill and Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek and at Teheran with Churchill and Soviet Premier Joseph Stalin to reach agreement on his plan for the “Four Policeman” to ensure postwar peace and stability. Already aware that after the war China likely would be weak because of wartime devastation and internal political divisions, the president, after his interaction with Chiang at Cairo, then lost all confidence in its ability to be an Asian policeman. However, China would reemerge as a united and strong nation after World War ii, but it would be under a Communist government. Mao Zedong declared that establishment of the People’s

Journal

Journal of American-East Asian RelationsBrill

Published: Mar 15, 2018

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