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Editor’s Note

Editor’s Note The first JANER of 2012 was a special issue deriving from a conference on “Imagined Beginnings: The Poetics and Politics of Cosmogony, Theogony and Anthropogony in the Ancient World” at the University of Chicago. Here Christopher Faraone and Andrea Seri brought together a set of fresh, penetrating essays on how ancient Near Eastern and Mediterranean poets crafted traditional creation stories, and how they were politically used or abused around the issue of kingship. By a happy coincidence this issue continues the theme with articles that cast bright and sometimes surprising light on origins often seen as murky and primordial. Aaron Tugendhaft writes on time and politics in the Ugaritic Baal epic, which has often been seen as showing an archetypal myth of gods battling for divine kingship, essentially the same in Babylonian, Canaanite and biblical literature. Instead, the epic draws on language specific to the international diplomacy of the Late Bronze Age to think about that political world. It is significant not least because “[r]ather than simply being a reflection of its world, the Baal Cycle furnishes its audience with a means to reflect on the political norms operative within it.” Yi Chen’s article traces the historical trajectory http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions Brill

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
Subject
Other
ISSN
1569-2116
eISSN
1569-2124
DOI
10.1163/15692124-12341234
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The first JANER of 2012 was a special issue deriving from a conference on “Imagined Beginnings: The Poetics and Politics of Cosmogony, Theogony and Anthropogony in the Ancient World” at the University of Chicago. Here Christopher Faraone and Andrea Seri brought together a set of fresh, penetrating essays on how ancient Near Eastern and Mediterranean poets crafted traditional creation stories, and how they were politically used or abused around the issue of kingship. By a happy coincidence this issue continues the theme with articles that cast bright and sometimes surprising light on origins often seen as murky and primordial. Aaron Tugendhaft writes on time and politics in the Ugaritic Baal epic, which has often been seen as showing an archetypal myth of gods battling for divine kingship, essentially the same in Babylonian, Canaanite and biblical literature. Instead, the epic draws on language specific to the international diplomacy of the Late Bronze Age to think about that political world. It is significant not least because “[r]ather than simply being a reflection of its world, the Baal Cycle furnishes its audience with a means to reflect on the political norms operative within it.” Yi Chen’s article traces the historical trajectory

Journal

Journal of Ancient Near Eastern ReligionsBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2012

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