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Climate Justice and Geoengineering: Ethics and Policy in the Atmospheric Anthropocene, edited by Christopher J. Preston

Climate Justice and Geoengineering: Ethics and Policy in the Atmospheric Anthropocene, edited by... Lanham, md: Rowman and Littlefield, 2016; isbn 978-1-78348-637-3; $30.00; 234 pp.The collective-action problem presented by climate change is the primary reason that greenhouse gas emission reductions remain far below optimal. This will continue to be the case, despite recent steps such as the Paris Agreement. Adapting to a changed climate will also be suboptimal because those countries that will need to adapt the most have the least resources to do so. In response, and because the planet is already locked into a certain amount of future warming from past emissions, geoengineering has been proposed as an additional mitigation tool by some. Geoengineering comes in two types. Carbon dioxide removal (cdr) would sequester CO2. It would be relatively low-risk and high-cost; its cooling impact would not be felt for a long time. Solar radiation management (srm) would reflect back into space a portion of incoming sunlight, cooling the planet. It would be relatively high-risk, low-cost, and fast-acting. Current modelling and experimental evidence indicates that some geoengineering techniques are technically feasible, economically viable, and could substantially—or even dramatically—reduce climate risks. However, uncertainties remain.There is now an extensive literature on the ethics of geoengineering. Christopher Preston, who has previously edited a path-breaking http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Climate Law Brill

Climate Justice and Geoengineering: Ethics and Policy in the Atmospheric Anthropocene, edited by Christopher J. Preston

Climate Law , Volume 7 (1): 5 – Jan 9, 2017

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1878-6553
eISSN
1878-6561
DOI
10.1163/18786561-00701002
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Lanham, md: Rowman and Littlefield, 2016; isbn 978-1-78348-637-3; $30.00; 234 pp.The collective-action problem presented by climate change is the primary reason that greenhouse gas emission reductions remain far below optimal. This will continue to be the case, despite recent steps such as the Paris Agreement. Adapting to a changed climate will also be suboptimal because those countries that will need to adapt the most have the least resources to do so. In response, and because the planet is already locked into a certain amount of future warming from past emissions, geoengineering has been proposed as an additional mitigation tool by some. Geoengineering comes in two types. Carbon dioxide removal (cdr) would sequester CO2. It would be relatively low-risk and high-cost; its cooling impact would not be felt for a long time. Solar radiation management (srm) would reflect back into space a portion of incoming sunlight, cooling the planet. It would be relatively high-risk, low-cost, and fast-acting. Current modelling and experimental evidence indicates that some geoengineering techniques are technically feasible, economically viable, and could substantially—or even dramatically—reduce climate risks. However, uncertainties remain.There is now an extensive literature on the ethics of geoengineering. Christopher Preston, who has previously edited a path-breaking

Journal

Climate LawBrill

Published: Jan 9, 2017

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