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Climate Displacement, Migration, and Relocation—And the United States

Climate Displacement, Migration, and Relocation—And the United States Most studies of climate-related displacement to date have highlighted the needs of the Global South. However, the impacts of sudden and slow-onset events on population movement are not limited to locations distant from the Global North in time and space. Indeed, communities in the United States are already grappling with the emerging phenomena.1Climate change impacts have forced uncommon conversations on planned relocation in diverse corners of the United States—from indigenous communities in precarious locations, to city-wide planning efforts to effectively host a probable migration from the us-affiliated Caribbean islands. The former is largely the result of slow-onset events, such as sea-level rise; the latter results from unprecedented, climate-fueled storms, such as Hurricane Maria. The us government has made efforts to anticipate and plan for possible crises resulting from communities forced to relocate because of climate-related threats to their lands and livelihoods. In December 2016, the Obama Administration’s White House Council on Environmental Quality, in collaboration with the Hawaiʻi and Alaska Sea Grant College Programs, and the Environmental Law Program of the University of Hawai‘i Mānoa, hosted a Symposium on Climate Displacement, Migration, and Relocation. The Symposium brought together over 100 participants to survey law and policy options that could http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Climate Law Brill

Climate Displacement, Migration, and Relocation—And the United States

Climate Law , Volume 7 (4): 5 – Nov 9, 2017

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1878-6553
eISSN
1878-6561
DOI
10.1163/18786561-00704001
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Most studies of climate-related displacement to date have highlighted the needs of the Global South. However, the impacts of sudden and slow-onset events on population movement are not limited to locations distant from the Global North in time and space. Indeed, communities in the United States are already grappling with the emerging phenomena.1Climate change impacts have forced uncommon conversations on planned relocation in diverse corners of the United States—from indigenous communities in precarious locations, to city-wide planning efforts to effectively host a probable migration from the us-affiliated Caribbean islands. The former is largely the result of slow-onset events, such as sea-level rise; the latter results from unprecedented, climate-fueled storms, such as Hurricane Maria. The us government has made efforts to anticipate and plan for possible crises resulting from communities forced to relocate because of climate-related threats to their lands and livelihoods. In December 2016, the Obama Administration’s White House Council on Environmental Quality, in collaboration with the Hawaiʻi and Alaska Sea Grant College Programs, and the Environmental Law Program of the University of Hawai‘i Mānoa, hosted a Symposium on Climate Displacement, Migration, and Relocation. The Symposium brought together over 100 participants to survey law and policy options that could

Journal

Climate LawBrill

Published: Nov 9, 2017

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