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Climate change law and governance from the “bottom up”: Introduction to the special issue

Climate change law and governance from the “bottom up”: Introduction to the special issue Climate Law 2 (2011) 459­468 DOI 10.3233/CL-2011-046 IOS Press Special issue articles Jacqueline Peel, Lee Godden and Rodney J. Keenan* I. Introduction Climate change law and governance are at a crossroads. As a problem of global dimensions, a centralized approach to climate change regulation, based in binding international legal arrangements, is widely preferred,1 but the course of current international negotiations offers little immediate promise in this regard.2 The international climate change regime, as it stands, consists of a general framework convention, the 1992 UNFCCC, and the 1997 Kyoto Protocol. The latter contains time-limited emission-reduction targets for parties representing only about a quarter of global greenhouse gas emissions.3 These legal instruments have been supplemented by "soft law", political documents such as the Copenhagen Accord4 and decisions under the UNFCCC and Kyoto Protocol such as the Cancun Agreements5 that seek to contain global authors would like to acknowledge the funding support under Australian Research Council Discovery Project DP0987850, Responding to Climate Change: Australia's Environmental Law and Regulatory Framework. 1 William Hare et al., The Architecture of the Global Climate Regime: a Top-Down Perspective, 10(6) Climate Policy 600 (2010). 2 Sebastian Oberth¨ r, Global Climate Governance after Cancun: Options for EU http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Climate Law Brill

Climate change law and governance from the “bottom up”: Introduction to the special issue

Climate Law , Volume 2 (4): 459 – Jan 1, 2011

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright 2011 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1878-6553
eISSN
1878-6561
DOI
10.1163/CL-2011-046
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Climate Law 2 (2011) 459­468 DOI 10.3233/CL-2011-046 IOS Press Special issue articles Jacqueline Peel, Lee Godden and Rodney J. Keenan* I. Introduction Climate change law and governance are at a crossroads. As a problem of global dimensions, a centralized approach to climate change regulation, based in binding international legal arrangements, is widely preferred,1 but the course of current international negotiations offers little immediate promise in this regard.2 The international climate change regime, as it stands, consists of a general framework convention, the 1992 UNFCCC, and the 1997 Kyoto Protocol. The latter contains time-limited emission-reduction targets for parties representing only about a quarter of global greenhouse gas emissions.3 These legal instruments have been supplemented by "soft law", political documents such as the Copenhagen Accord4 and decisions under the UNFCCC and Kyoto Protocol such as the Cancun Agreements5 that seek to contain global authors would like to acknowledge the funding support under Australian Research Council Discovery Project DP0987850, Responding to Climate Change: Australia's Environmental Law and Regulatory Framework. 1 William Hare et al., The Architecture of the Global Climate Regime: a Top-Down Perspective, 10(6) Climate Policy 600 (2010). 2 Sebastian Oberth¨ r, Global Climate Governance after Cancun: Options for EU

Journal

Climate LawBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2011

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