Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Citizenship between Empire and Nation: Remaking France and French Africa, 1945-1960

Citizenship between Empire and Nation: Remaking France and French Africa, 1945-1960 BOOK REVIEWS | 161 Citizenship between Empire and Nation: Remaking France and French Africa, 1945-1960 By Frederick COOPER Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2014. xvi + 493 pp. ISBN: 978-0691161310 (Hardback) Reviewed by Michael RATNAPALAN Yonsei University, Korea (Republic of) doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.12773/arwh.2015.3.1.161 For a long time in modern international history, there has been an orthodox belief in a smooth and inevitable mid-twentieth century transition from empire to nation-state across the former colonial world. The latest book by Frederick Cooper, Citizenship between Empire and Nation, calls this seriously into question. One of the key figures in Cooper’s study, Leopold Senghor, who was to become the first leader of independent Senegal in 1960, at one time regarded nationalism as an “illness.” Cooper starts from this basis to explore the change from formal French empire to independent West African nation-state not as “an event, not a moment, but a process” (p. 4). At the heart of this book are debates about citizenship con- ducted in France and in French West Africa, which describe an effort to reconcile the universal (“French” citizenship) with the particular (“African” cultures). A number of remarkable West Af- rican intellectuals engaged with the French in a quest for impe- http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asian Review of World Histories Brill

Citizenship between Empire and Nation: Remaking France and French Africa, 1945-1960

Asian Review of World Histories , Volume 3 (1): 4 – Jun 29, 2015

Loading next page...
 
/lp/brill/citizenship-between-empire-and-nation-remaking-france-and-french-1yXfjaOzJw
Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
2287-965X
eISSN
2287-9811
DOI
10.12773/arwh.2015.3.1.161
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

BOOK REVIEWS | 161 Citizenship between Empire and Nation: Remaking France and French Africa, 1945-1960 By Frederick COOPER Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2014. xvi + 493 pp. ISBN: 978-0691161310 (Hardback) Reviewed by Michael RATNAPALAN Yonsei University, Korea (Republic of) doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.12773/arwh.2015.3.1.161 For a long time in modern international history, there has been an orthodox belief in a smooth and inevitable mid-twentieth century transition from empire to nation-state across the former colonial world. The latest book by Frederick Cooper, Citizenship between Empire and Nation, calls this seriously into question. One of the key figures in Cooper’s study, Leopold Senghor, who was to become the first leader of independent Senegal in 1960, at one time regarded nationalism as an “illness.” Cooper starts from this basis to explore the change from formal French empire to independent West African nation-state not as “an event, not a moment, but a process” (p. 4). At the heart of this book are debates about citizenship con- ducted in France and in French West Africa, which describe an effort to reconcile the universal (“French” citizenship) with the particular (“African” cultures). A number of remarkable West Af- rican intellectuals engaged with the French in a quest for impe-

Journal

Asian Review of World HistoriesBrill

Published: Jun 29, 2015

There are no references for this article.