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Choosing War: The Lost Chance for Peace and the Escalation of War in Vietnam.

Choosing War: The Lost Chance for Peace and the Escalation of War in Vietnam. 252 The Journal of American–East Asian Relations ter of Chinese-American literature. Chinese-language writers feel more com- fortable writing in their native language as they seek to portray their lives. They do not have to worry about catering to mainstream publishers and readers. Their works deal with controversial issues such as the promises and perils of assimilation, clashes between American dream and reality, interracial love affairs, and relationships between Chinese and other ethnic groups. Some issues such as poverty and conflicts among different segments of the Chinese community seldom appear in the works of native-born Chinese-American writers. The author could have devoted more space in the last chapter to Frank Chin and Maxine Hong Kingston, although these two important contempo- rary writers did not become influential until the late 1980s and 1990s. The author briefly discusses the Chin-Kingston controversy as the outcome of “the role of ideology in creative writing.” This chapter is the shortest one in the book; it lacks sufficient analysis and concludes the book in a slightly rushed manner. Although the author in his introduction clearly defines the time frame in the book is from 1850s to 1980s, the book regretfully leaves the reader right before http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of American-East Asian Relations Brill

Choosing War: The Lost Chance for Peace and the Escalation of War in Vietnam.

Journal of American-East Asian Relations , Volume 9 (3-4): 252 – Jan 1, 2000

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2000 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1058-3947
eISSN
1876-5610
DOI
10.1163/187656100793645912
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

252 The Journal of American–East Asian Relations ter of Chinese-American literature. Chinese-language writers feel more com- fortable writing in their native language as they seek to portray their lives. They do not have to worry about catering to mainstream publishers and readers. Their works deal with controversial issues such as the promises and perils of assimilation, clashes between American dream and reality, interracial love affairs, and relationships between Chinese and other ethnic groups. Some issues such as poverty and conflicts among different segments of the Chinese community seldom appear in the works of native-born Chinese-American writers. The author could have devoted more space in the last chapter to Frank Chin and Maxine Hong Kingston, although these two important contempo- rary writers did not become influential until the late 1980s and 1990s. The author briefly discusses the Chin-Kingston controversy as the outcome of “the role of ideology in creative writing.” This chapter is the shortest one in the book; it lacks sufficient analysis and concludes the book in a slightly rushed manner. Although the author in his introduction clearly defines the time frame in the book is from 1850s to 1980s, the book regretfully leaves the reader right before

Journal

Journal of American-East Asian RelationsBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2000

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