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Book reviews

Book reviews from the climate-policy perspective. The authors do not really answer the question whether this is an area where synergies between trade and climate policies can be found. They note that "economists in general do not like subsidies because they are often not the most efficient instrument to solve a problem", and they explain why subsidies are "significantly restricted" by WTO rules. As in other chapters, the climate-policy arguments supporting the use of subsidies are not examined in detail. This, however, would have been interesting, in view of the fact that Working Group III's contribution to the IPCC's Fourth Assessment Report concluded that subsidies are often critical to overcome barriers to climate change mitigation. Could governments seek to promote renewable energy in ways that are compatible with WTO rules? Are there other WTO-compatible ways to promote an urgent transition from fossil fuels to renewable energy (such as abolishing fossil-fuel subsidies)? Attempting to make a closer connection between the relevant WTO rules and concrete climatepolicy dilemmas would have been interesting also in other respects. Promoting renewable energy is popular in developed and developing countries for both climate change and energy-security reasons. Yet, such support schemes are also likely to give http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Climate Law Brill

Book reviews

Climate Law , Volume 2 (3): 447 – Jan 1, 2011

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright 2011 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1878-6553
eISSN
1878-6561
DOI
10.1163/CL-2011-045
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

from the climate-policy perspective. The authors do not really answer the question whether this is an area where synergies between trade and climate policies can be found. They note that "economists in general do not like subsidies because they are often not the most efficient instrument to solve a problem", and they explain why subsidies are "significantly restricted" by WTO rules. As in other chapters, the climate-policy arguments supporting the use of subsidies are not examined in detail. This, however, would have been interesting, in view of the fact that Working Group III's contribution to the IPCC's Fourth Assessment Report concluded that subsidies are often critical to overcome barriers to climate change mitigation. Could governments seek to promote renewable energy in ways that are compatible with WTO rules? Are there other WTO-compatible ways to promote an urgent transition from fossil fuels to renewable energy (such as abolishing fossil-fuel subsidies)? Attempting to make a closer connection between the relevant WTO rules and concrete climatepolicy dilemmas would have been interesting also in other respects. Promoting renewable energy is popular in developed and developing countries for both climate change and energy-security reasons. Yet, such support schemes are also likely to give

Journal

Climate LawBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2011

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