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Book Review: Improving the Clean Development Mechanism: Options and Challenges Post-2012 , Edited by Michael Mehling, Amy Merrill, and Karl Upston-Hooper

Book Review: Improving the Clean Development Mechanism: Options and Challenges Post-2012 , Edited... Lexxion, 2011, 302 pp., ISBN 978-3-86965-023-4. The distribution of emission-reduction obligations between developed and developing countries and the extent of climate-financing commitments play a central role in ongoing negotiations for a new international climate architecture. In accordance with the principle of common but differentiated responsibilities, developed countries should to take the lead in the implementation of emission-reduction measures and assist developing and least developed countries to move towards climate-friendly economic development. How this assistance – in particular financial assistance – is to take place is a controversial issue. Under the Clean Development Mechanism of the Kyoto Protocol, Annex I countries may implement emission-reduction projects in non-Annex I countries and use the resulting carbon credits to comply with their international emission-reduction commitments under the Protocol. This project-based approach to the financing of climate change mitigation projects in developing countries raises difficult questions of ‘additionality’ (how to measure whether a project achieves emission reductions that would not have taken place in the absence of this project). Methodologies to demonstrate additionality create a heavy administrative burden and do not necessarily send the right signal to national authorities regarding the adoption and implementation of ambitious domestic clean-energy policies. Moreover, depressed carbon prices http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Climate Law Brill

Book Review: Improving the Clean Development Mechanism: Options and Challenges Post-2012 , Edited by Michael Mehling, Amy Merrill, and Karl Upston-Hooper

Climate Law , Volume 4 (3-4): 361 – Feb 23, 2014

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2015 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
Subject
Book Reviews
ISSN
1878-6553
eISSN
1878-6561
DOI
10.1163/18786561-00404010
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Lexxion, 2011, 302 pp., ISBN 978-3-86965-023-4. The distribution of emission-reduction obligations between developed and developing countries and the extent of climate-financing commitments play a central role in ongoing negotiations for a new international climate architecture. In accordance with the principle of common but differentiated responsibilities, developed countries should to take the lead in the implementation of emission-reduction measures and assist developing and least developed countries to move towards climate-friendly economic development. How this assistance – in particular financial assistance – is to take place is a controversial issue. Under the Clean Development Mechanism of the Kyoto Protocol, Annex I countries may implement emission-reduction projects in non-Annex I countries and use the resulting carbon credits to comply with their international emission-reduction commitments under the Protocol. This project-based approach to the financing of climate change mitigation projects in developing countries raises difficult questions of ‘additionality’ (how to measure whether a project achieves emission reductions that would not have taken place in the absence of this project). Methodologies to demonstrate additionality create a heavy administrative burden and do not necessarily send the right signal to national authorities regarding the adoption and implementation of ambitious domestic clean-energy policies. Moreover, depressed carbon prices

Journal

Climate LawBrill

Published: Feb 23, 2014

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