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Bazaar-excavated Lapis Lazuli Discs and Axes

Bazaar-excavated Lapis Lazuli Discs and Axes BAZAAR-EXCAVATED LAPIS LAZULI DISCS AND AXES OSCAR WHITE MUSCARELLA In AMIT 34, 2002 (published in 2003), R. M. Boehmer challenges conclu- sions I presented in different venues concerning two distinct artifact types and in so doing raises fundamental issues pertaining to archaeological methodology, speci fi cally pertaining to the formation of cultural conclusions when research- ing unexcavated artifacts. The fi rst set of artifacts discussed are those I pub- lished in an article for his Festschrift , 1 and which I subsequently discussed with him in a personal letter (email) written on June 26, 2001. 2 I argued that two small unexcavated lapis lazuli discs, one in the J. Rosen collection (New York City), the other in the Bible Lands Museum, Jerusalem, both portraying scenes that represent apparent Early Dynastic (ED) scenes and bearing the name of the Akkadian king Rimush, were most probably modern forgeries. My 1995 paper was written in part contra E. Porada (1992) who not only pub- lished the Rosen disc as an ancient artifact (she ignored the Jerusalem disc), but also created out of nothing its alleged ancient history. To her, the disc, depicting an ED scene, was in fact carved in Kerman, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ancient Civilizations from Scythia to Siberia Brill

Bazaar-excavated Lapis Lazuli Discs and Axes

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2004 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0929-077X
eISSN
1570-0577
DOI
10.1163/1570057042596360
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

BAZAAR-EXCAVATED LAPIS LAZULI DISCS AND AXES OSCAR WHITE MUSCARELLA In AMIT 34, 2002 (published in 2003), R. M. Boehmer challenges conclu- sions I presented in different venues concerning two distinct artifact types and in so doing raises fundamental issues pertaining to archaeological methodology, speci fi cally pertaining to the formation of cultural conclusions when research- ing unexcavated artifacts. The fi rst set of artifacts discussed are those I pub- lished in an article for his Festschrift , 1 and which I subsequently discussed with him in a personal letter (email) written on June 26, 2001. 2 I argued that two small unexcavated lapis lazuli discs, one in the J. Rosen collection (New York City), the other in the Bible Lands Museum, Jerusalem, both portraying scenes that represent apparent Early Dynastic (ED) scenes and bearing the name of the Akkadian king Rimush, were most probably modern forgeries. My 1995 paper was written in part contra E. Porada (1992) who not only pub- lished the Rosen disc as an ancient artifact (she ignored the Jerusalem disc), but also created out of nothing its alleged ancient history. To her, the disc, depicting an ED scene, was in fact carved in Kerman,

Journal

Ancient Civilizations from Scythia to SiberiaBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2004

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