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Backlash against a Rules-Based International Human Rights Order? An Australian Perspective

Backlash against a Rules-Based International Human Rights Order? An Australian Perspective Backlash against a Rules-Based International Human Rights Order? An Australian Perspective Jolyon Ford* 1 Introduction This article engag— es from an Australian perspectiv —with e the question of whether we can identify a recent populist political “backlash” within some Western democracies against the institutions, instruments and even the ideas of the multilateral (United Nations (‘UN’) tr and eaty -based) human rights system. An associated question concerns what the implications of any such phenomenon might be for the universalist human rights system (or at least Australia’s participation therein), and perhaps the implications for the wider global legal order of which the human rights project has, for decades now, been such an important part. Much depends, of course, on how one defines or marks a threshold for what constitutes backlash, and whether it describes an action, event, driver or other phenomenon (which may or may not have certain effects), or rather describes an outcome, effects, or impacts. A definition that was influential in the w - ork shops to which this Special Issue relates would distinguish mere discontent with an institution or status quo and instead cast backlash as involving ‘funda- mental resistance to and rejection of a system or institution http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Australian Year Book of International Law Online Brill

Backlash against a Rules-Based International Human Rights Order? An Australian Perspective

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
eISSN
2666-0229
DOI
10.1163/26660229_03801009
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Backlash against a Rules-Based International Human Rights Order? An Australian Perspective Jolyon Ford* 1 Introduction This article engag— es from an Australian perspectiv —with e the question of whether we can identify a recent populist political “backlash” within some Western democracies against the institutions, instruments and even the ideas of the multilateral (United Nations (‘UN’) tr and eaty -based) human rights system. An associated question concerns what the implications of any such phenomenon might be for the universalist human rights system (or at least Australia’s participation therein), and perhaps the implications for the wider global legal order of which the human rights project has, for decades now, been such an important part. Much depends, of course, on how one defines or marks a threshold for what constitutes backlash, and whether it describes an action, event, driver or other phenomenon (which may or may not have certain effects), or rather describes an outcome, effects, or impacts. A definition that was influential in the w - ork shops to which this Special Issue relates would distinguish mere discontent with an institution or status quo and instead cast backlash as involving ‘funda- mental resistance to and rejection of a system or institution

Journal

The Australian Year Book of International Law OnlineBrill

Published: Dec 12, 2021

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