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Ancient Middle Niger: Urbanism and the Self-Organizing Landscape. By Roderick J. McIntosh , Case Studies in Early Societies 7, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 278 pp., ISBN 0521012430 (paperback), 052181300X (hardback). Price 19.99 £ (paperback), 50.00 £ (hardback).

Ancient Middle Niger: Urbanism and the Self-Organizing Landscape. By Roderick J. McIntosh , Case... complex systems model of social DOI 10.3213/1612-1651-10082 © Africa Magna Verlag, Frankfurt M. Journal of African Archaeology Vol. 4 (2), 2006, pp. 357-359 Book Review change that he claims can explain the development of the Middle Niger type of non-hierarchical economic urbanism. Although I have great respect for this type of systems modeling, I do not find his application credible. Claims to the effect that people had "an ethos of Ecological Resilience" (p. 149) seem to confuse levels of analysis. Chapter 2, "Transformed landscapes", is a detailed and, in places, technical discussion of climate, landscape, and other environmental parameters of early urbanism. The crucial point for understanding the development of Jenne-jeno is that climate, rainfall, streamflow, and alluvial processes are extremely variable in this region. In Chapter 3, "Accommodation", McIntosh presents his major interpretive models. Among the most significant is the "Pulse Model", which is discussed at length. McIntosh, however, never gives an explicit definition or description of the model. He states that "the Pulse Model deals with" certain phenomena; it "purports to deal with" other things; it "attempts" to go places; it "posits the existence" of some things; it "predicts the locations" of sites; it "requires" certain http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of African Archaeology Brill

Ancient Middle Niger: Urbanism and the Self-Organizing Landscape. By Roderick J. McIntosh , Case Studies in Early Societies 7, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 278 pp., ISBN 0521012430 (paperback), 052181300X (hardback). Price 19.99 £ (paperback), 50.00 £ (hardback).

Journal of African Archaeology , Volume 4 (2): 357 – Oct 25, 2006

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© Copyright 2006 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1612-1651
eISSN
2191-5784
DOI
10.3213/1612-1651-10082
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

complex systems model of social DOI 10.3213/1612-1651-10082 © Africa Magna Verlag, Frankfurt M. Journal of African Archaeology Vol. 4 (2), 2006, pp. 357-359 Book Review change that he claims can explain the development of the Middle Niger type of non-hierarchical economic urbanism. Although I have great respect for this type of systems modeling, I do not find his application credible. Claims to the effect that people had "an ethos of Ecological Resilience" (p. 149) seem to confuse levels of analysis. Chapter 2, "Transformed landscapes", is a detailed and, in places, technical discussion of climate, landscape, and other environmental parameters of early urbanism. The crucial point for understanding the development of Jenne-jeno is that climate, rainfall, streamflow, and alluvial processes are extremely variable in this region. In Chapter 3, "Accommodation", McIntosh presents his major interpretive models. Among the most significant is the "Pulse Model", which is discussed at length. McIntosh, however, never gives an explicit definition or description of the model. He states that "the Pulse Model deals with" certain phenomena; it "purports to deal with" other things; it "attempts" to go places; it "posits the existence" of some things; it "predicts the locations" of sites; it "requires" certain

Journal

Journal of African ArchaeologyBrill

Published: Oct 25, 2006

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