Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

AN INDIGENOUS TECHNOLOGY?: A COMMENTARY ON LANKTON et al. "“EARLY PRIMARY GLASS PRODUCTION IN SOUTHERN NIGERIA”"

AN INDIGENOUS TECHNOLOGY?: A COMMENTARY ON LANKTON et al. "“EARLY PRIMARY GLASS PRODUCTION IN... AN INDIGENOUS TECHNOLOGY? A COMMENTARY ON LANKTON et al. "EARLY PRIMARY GLASS PRODUCTION IN SOUTHERN NIGERIA" Ian C. Freestone In the accompanying paper, Lankton, Ige and Rehren (this issue, pp. 111-138) argue that a group of high-lime, high-alumina glasses from southern Nigeria are of a unique composition, strongly suggesting that glass was made from its raw materials in that region. This is an important conclusion that would have been difficult to draw with confidence even a decade ago. However, recent years have seen the publication of many papers on the compositions of early glasses from Europe and Asia in the archaeometric literature, as well as two large corpuses of data (BRILL 1999; DUSSUBIEUX 2001). Coverage is geographically and chronologically broad. Within the existing database of perhaps 10,000 analyses, there can be little doubt that this Ile-Ife glass is unique, particularly in its combination of high lime and exceptionally high alumina contents. The apparent restriction of this glass type to a specific region must surely mean that it was produced there. Primary glass making has become of particular interest to students of early technology in recent years because it does not appear to have been a widespread skill. There http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of African Archaeology Brill

AN INDIGENOUS TECHNOLOGY?: A COMMENTARY ON LANKTON et al. "“EARLY PRIMARY GLASS PRODUCTION IN SOUTHERN NIGERIA”"

Journal of African Archaeology , Volume 4 (1): 139 – Oct 25, 2006

Loading next page...
 
/lp/brill/an-indigenous-technology-a-commentary-on-lankton-et-al-early-primary-uM9Qy2mbPq
Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© Copyright 2006 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1612-1651
eISSN
2191-5784
DOI
10.3213/1612-1651-10066
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AN INDIGENOUS TECHNOLOGY? A COMMENTARY ON LANKTON et al. "EARLY PRIMARY GLASS PRODUCTION IN SOUTHERN NIGERIA" Ian C. Freestone In the accompanying paper, Lankton, Ige and Rehren (this issue, pp. 111-138) argue that a group of high-lime, high-alumina glasses from southern Nigeria are of a unique composition, strongly suggesting that glass was made from its raw materials in that region. This is an important conclusion that would have been difficult to draw with confidence even a decade ago. However, recent years have seen the publication of many papers on the compositions of early glasses from Europe and Asia in the archaeometric literature, as well as two large corpuses of data (BRILL 1999; DUSSUBIEUX 2001). Coverage is geographically and chronologically broad. Within the existing database of perhaps 10,000 analyses, there can be little doubt that this Ile-Ife glass is unique, particularly in its combination of high lime and exceptionally high alumina contents. The apparent restriction of this glass type to a specific region must surely mean that it was produced there. Primary glass making has become of particular interest to students of early technology in recent years because it does not appear to have been a widespread skill. There

Journal

Journal of African ArchaeologyBrill

Published: Oct 25, 2006

There are no references for this article.