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A Report on the Archaeological Assemblages from Excavations by Peter Beaumont at Canteen Koppie, Northern Cape, South Africa. By John McNabb & Peter Beaumont. B.A.R. International Series 2275. University of Southampton Series in Archaeology 4. Archaeopress, Oxford, 2011, vi + 86 pp. ISBN 9781407308494. £ 29.00 (Paperback).

A Report on the Archaeological Assemblages from Excavations by Peter Beaumont at Canteen Koppie,... In 1869 as a ragtag army of miners set up camp at Klipdrift on the Vaal River they transformed the social landscape of the interior of South Africa and set in motion the political tensions that culminated in the Boer War. They also created a massive headache for Paleolithic archaeologists. The hill at Klipdrift, which became known as Canteen Koppie (alternate spelling Kopje), produced not only diamonds but also massive quantities of handaxes. Canteen Kopje became a key spot on the Paleolithic grand tour, easily accessible for visitors to South Africa who took the train from Cape Town to Kimberley. The Vaal River sequence came to play a major role in the development of a framework for the Paleolithic archaeology of Africa in the years preceding the discoveries at Olduvai Gorge. Like the other hominin localities along the Vaal River, Canteen Koppie did not produce associated fauna and lithics, and although it was possible to develop a relative chronology for the Vaal River gravels absolute dating has been elusive. As a result Canteen Kopje has languished in an archaeological purgatory as a site that is mentioned in many syntheses of African archaeology but has contributed little to contemporary http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of African Archaeology Brill

A Report on the Archaeological Assemblages from Excavations by Peter Beaumont at Canteen Koppie, Northern Cape, South Africa. By John McNabb & Peter Beaumont. B.A.R. International Series 2275. University of Southampton Series in Archaeology 4. Archaeopress, Oxford, 2011, vi + 86 pp. ISBN 9781407308494. £ 29.00 (Paperback).

Journal of African Archaeology , Volume 11 (2): 281 – Nov 11, 2013

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© Copyright 2013 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1612-1651
eISSN
2191-5784
DOI
10.3213/2191-5784-10237
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In 1869 as a ragtag army of miners set up camp at Klipdrift on the Vaal River they transformed the social landscape of the interior of South Africa and set in motion the political tensions that culminated in the Boer War. They also created a massive headache for Paleolithic archaeologists. The hill at Klipdrift, which became known as Canteen Koppie (alternate spelling Kopje), produced not only diamonds but also massive quantities of handaxes. Canteen Kopje became a key spot on the Paleolithic grand tour, easily accessible for visitors to South Africa who took the train from Cape Town to Kimberley. The Vaal River sequence came to play a major role in the development of a framework for the Paleolithic archaeology of Africa in the years preceding the discoveries at Olduvai Gorge. Like the other hominin localities along the Vaal River, Canteen Koppie did not produce associated fauna and lithics, and although it was possible to develop a relative chronology for the Vaal River gravels absolute dating has been elusive. As a result Canteen Kopje has languished in an archaeological purgatory as a site that is mentioned in many syntheses of African archaeology but has contributed little to contemporary

Journal

Journal of African ArchaeologyBrill

Published: Nov 11, 2013

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