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Women's Religious Celibacy and Gender Identities among the Bulgarian Catholics in the Plovdiv Region: A Case Study of the Villages of General Nikolaevo and Sekirovo

Women's Religious Celibacy and Gender Identities among the Bulgarian Catholics in the Plovdiv... The article deals with the institution of `village nuns', a form of religious celibacy among Bulgarian Catholics in the Plovdiv region during the first half of the twentieth century. The primary concern of this article is the structuring and functioning of the institution of village nuns, viewed from the perspective of the fractal dichotomy strategy­tactics, belonging to the paradigm of fractal dichotomies including religious culture­traditional culture, clergy/male celibacy-­nuns/female celibacy, masculinity­femininity. The sources used in the research are of different types: census registers, parochial books, civil registers of births and deaths, household registers, property tax registers, various publications of the Catholic Church in Bulgaria, and ethnographic field material collected by the author. The methodology employed combines various qualitative methods: the gatekeeper and snowball methods, structured and semi-structured interviews, the biographical method and the comparative method. The analysis shows that the nuns' institution can be treated as a turning point at which female tactics turn into strategies and bring about certain power shi s affecting gender relations. KEYWORDS: Bulgarian Catholics, early twentieth century, gender identity, gender power relationships, village nuns Introduction This article explores the institution of the so-called village nuns among Catholics in the villages of General Nikolaevo and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aspasia Berghahn Books

Women's Religious Celibacy and Gender Identities among the Bulgarian Catholics in the Plovdiv Region: A Case Study of the Villages of General Nikolaevo and Sekirovo

Aspasia , Volume 3 (1) – Mar 1, 2009

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Publisher
Berghahn Books
Copyright
© 2022 Berghahn Books
ISSN
1933-2882
eISSN
1933-2890
DOI
10.3167/asp.2009.030103
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The article deals with the institution of `village nuns', a form of religious celibacy among Bulgarian Catholics in the Plovdiv region during the first half of the twentieth century. The primary concern of this article is the structuring and functioning of the institution of village nuns, viewed from the perspective of the fractal dichotomy strategy­tactics, belonging to the paradigm of fractal dichotomies including religious culture­traditional culture, clergy/male celibacy-­nuns/female celibacy, masculinity­femininity. The sources used in the research are of different types: census registers, parochial books, civil registers of births and deaths, household registers, property tax registers, various publications of the Catholic Church in Bulgaria, and ethnographic field material collected by the author. The methodology employed combines various qualitative methods: the gatekeeper and snowball methods, structured and semi-structured interviews, the biographical method and the comparative method. The analysis shows that the nuns' institution can be treated as a turning point at which female tactics turn into strategies and bring about certain power shi s affecting gender relations. KEYWORDS: Bulgarian Catholics, early twentieth century, gender identity, gender power relationships, village nuns Introduction This article explores the institution of the so-called village nuns among Catholics in the villages of General Nikolaevo and

Journal

AspasiaBerghahn Books

Published: Mar 1, 2009

Keywords: Bulgarian Catholics; early twentieth century; gender identity; gender power relationships; village nuns

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