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Women, Resistance and the Politics of Daily Life in Hitler's Europe: The Case of Yugoslavia in a Comparative Perspective

Women, Resistance and the Politics of Daily Life in Hitler's Europe: The Case of Yugoslavia in a... This article uses a comparative transnational model for a study of women's resistance in Yugoslavia, with particular reference to the Independent State of Croatia. It challenges the dominant paradigm of active resistance in Hitler's Europe as a largely masculine and military activity. Historians have long recognised the contribution of women to resistance in Yugoslavia; however, an ideologised and politically driven interpretation of wartime behaviour, combined with an overemphasis on active resistance, has militated against a nuanced approach towards the study of dissent in its diverse manifestations. This article proposes that a woman-centred focus on the social, everyday aspects of resistance is illuminating on definitions of and the preconditions necessary for successful resistance as well as on the subject of collaboration and conformism in the Second World War. KEYWORDS: Balkans, collaboration, gender, Independent State of Croatia, resistance, Second World War, transnational, Yugoslavia, Yugoslav exceptionalism Introduction The premise of this article is that, while resistance studies have drawn on a range of approaches and methodologies, including women's history and the history of daily life, our understanding of what it meant to resist in Hitler's Europe remains partial and inadequate.1 This article will argue that the entrenched fixation of historians with http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aspasia Berghahn Books

Women, Resistance and the Politics of Daily Life in Hitler's Europe: The Case of Yugoslavia in a Comparative Perspective

Aspasia , Volume 3 (1) – Mar 1, 2009

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Publisher
Berghahn Books
Copyright
© 2022 Berghahn Books
ISSN
1933-2882
eISSN
1933-2890
DOI
10.3167/asp.2009.030104
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article uses a comparative transnational model for a study of women's resistance in Yugoslavia, with particular reference to the Independent State of Croatia. It challenges the dominant paradigm of active resistance in Hitler's Europe as a largely masculine and military activity. Historians have long recognised the contribution of women to resistance in Yugoslavia; however, an ideologised and politically driven interpretation of wartime behaviour, combined with an overemphasis on active resistance, has militated against a nuanced approach towards the study of dissent in its diverse manifestations. This article proposes that a woman-centred focus on the social, everyday aspects of resistance is illuminating on definitions of and the preconditions necessary for successful resistance as well as on the subject of collaboration and conformism in the Second World War. KEYWORDS: Balkans, collaboration, gender, Independent State of Croatia, resistance, Second World War, transnational, Yugoslavia, Yugoslav exceptionalism Introduction The premise of this article is that, while resistance studies have drawn on a range of approaches and methodologies, including women's history and the history of daily life, our understanding of what it meant to resist in Hitler's Europe remains partial and inadequate.1 This article will argue that the entrenched fixation of historians with

Journal

AspasiaBerghahn Books

Published: Mar 1, 2009

Keywords: Balkans; collaboration; gender; Independent State of Croatia; resistance; Second World War; transnational; Yugoslavia; Yugoslav exceptionalism

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