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The Tensions within the Early Twentieth-Century Bulgarian Women's Movement

The Tensions within the Early Twentieth-Century Bulgarian Women's Movement the source The Tensions within the Early Twentieth-Century Bulgarian Women’s Movement Introduction and Translation: Krassimira Daskalova with Karen Offen Sources translated and discussed: Vela Blagoeva, “Klasovo suznanie i feminism” (Class consciousness and feminism), Zhenski trud (Women’s labor) 1, no. 2 (1904–1905): 1–2; [Ana Karima], “Nie” (We), Ravnopravie (Equal rights) 1, no. 1 (November 1908): 1–2; [A. Karima], “Vnasiame li nie raztseplenie” (Do we divide the Union?) Ravnopravie 1, no. 3 (1908): 1–2. Bulgaria became an independent state, a constitutional monarchy with a German-born king, in 1878, following the period of National Revival and eventual Liberation, which grew in pposition to fi ve centuries of Ott oman rule. Within this context of nation-state building, women’s education emerged as an issue of singular interest (as was also the case in Western and Central Europe). Urban women began to speak out on these questions, particularly with respect to opportunities for secondary and higher edu- cation for girls and young women. Women also came together to promote charitable and philanthropic causes, and in 1901 organized the Bulgarski zhenski suiuz (Bul- garian Women’s Union), with the specifi c purpose of promoting “the intellectual and spiritual uplift ing” of Bulgarian women. This federation, uniting twenty-seven http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aspasia Berghahn Books

The Tensions within the Early Twentieth-Century Bulgarian Women's Movement

Aspasia , Volume 9 (1): 13 – Mar 1, 2015

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Publisher
Berghahn Books
Copyright
© 2022 Berghahn Books
ISSN
1933-2882
eISSN
1933-2890
DOI
10.3167/asp.2015.090107
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

the source The Tensions within the Early Twentieth-Century Bulgarian Women’s Movement Introduction and Translation: Krassimira Daskalova with Karen Offen Sources translated and discussed: Vela Blagoeva, “Klasovo suznanie i feminism” (Class consciousness and feminism), Zhenski trud (Women’s labor) 1, no. 2 (1904–1905): 1–2; [Ana Karima], “Nie” (We), Ravnopravie (Equal rights) 1, no. 1 (November 1908): 1–2; [A. Karima], “Vnasiame li nie raztseplenie” (Do we divide the Union?) Ravnopravie 1, no. 3 (1908): 1–2. Bulgaria became an independent state, a constitutional monarchy with a German-born king, in 1878, following the period of National Revival and eventual Liberation, which grew in pposition to fi ve centuries of Ott oman rule. Within this context of nation-state building, women’s education emerged as an issue of singular interest (as was also the case in Western and Central Europe). Urban women began to speak out on these questions, particularly with respect to opportunities for secondary and higher edu- cation for girls and young women. Women also came together to promote charitable and philanthropic causes, and in 1901 organized the Bulgarski zhenski suiuz (Bul- garian Women’s Union), with the specifi c purpose of promoting “the intellectual and spiritual uplift ing” of Bulgarian women. This federation, uniting twenty-seven

Journal

AspasiaBerghahn Books

Published: Mar 1, 2015

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