Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The Return of Mother Russia: Representations of Women in Soviet Wartime Cinema

The Return of Mother Russia: Representations of Women in Soviet Wartime Cinema they recalled posters and o en relied on a symbolically charged mise-en-scène. KEYWORDS: Second World War, the Great Patriotic War, Soviet, cinema, Mother Russia, femininity, masculinity The War’s Central Image Starting from the first weeks of what the Soviet Union called the Great Patriotic War (1941–1945), many short and full-length feature films showed women joining the ranks of the Red Army and the partisans.1 They also appeared as mothers, wives and sisters who inspired their sons, husbands and brothers to fight bravely – as substitutes for men in traditionally male professions, and as victims of the enemy’s atrocities, whose suffering called for vengeance. Meant to rally the population at a time of instability and chaos, wartime films offered a variety of female portraits many of which served as symbolic representations of the country itself, of stoic Mother Russia, determined to defeat the enemy and to endure hardships and cope with deprivation and grief.2 During and a er the Second World War, the term Rodina-mat’ was translated into English as ‘Mother Russia’ which is confusing because the Soviet notion of Rodina-mat’ is different from Rossiia-matushka, the old personification of Russia, which is also translated into English as ‘Mother Russia’. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aspasia Berghahn Books

The Return of Mother Russia: Representations of Women in Soviet Wartime Cinema

Aspasia , Volume 4 (1) – Mar 1, 2010

Loading next page...
 
/lp/berghahn-books/the-return-of-mother-russia-representations-of-women-in-soviet-wartime-TwGwYgrIQw

References

References for this paper are not available at this time. We will be adding them shortly, thank you for your patience.

Publisher
Berghahn Books
Copyright
© 2022 Berghahn Books
ISSN
1933-2882
eISSN
1933-2890
DOI
10.3167/asp.2010.040108
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

they recalled posters and o en relied on a symbolically charged mise-en-scène. KEYWORDS: Second World War, the Great Patriotic War, Soviet, cinema, Mother Russia, femininity, masculinity The War’s Central Image Starting from the first weeks of what the Soviet Union called the Great Patriotic War (1941–1945), many short and full-length feature films showed women joining the ranks of the Red Army and the partisans.1 They also appeared as mothers, wives and sisters who inspired their sons, husbands and brothers to fight bravely – as substitutes for men in traditionally male professions, and as victims of the enemy’s atrocities, whose suffering called for vengeance. Meant to rally the population at a time of instability and chaos, wartime films offered a variety of female portraits many of which served as symbolic representations of the country itself, of stoic Mother Russia, determined to defeat the enemy and to endure hardships and cope with deprivation and grief.2 During and a er the Second World War, the term Rodina-mat’ was translated into English as ‘Mother Russia’ which is confusing because the Soviet notion of Rodina-mat’ is different from Rossiia-matushka, the old personification of Russia, which is also translated into English as ‘Mother Russia’.

Journal

AspasiaBerghahn Books

Published: Mar 1, 2010

Keywords: cinema; femininity; Great Patriotic War; masculinity; Mother Russia; Second World War; Soviet Union; Wold War II

There are no references for this article.