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Editorial

Editorial In the years a er the fall of communist governments in Central, Eastern, and Southeastern Europe (CESEE), a flood of memoir literature began to fill bookstores around the region. Some of these books were newly wri en, others had been composed long ago but could not be published during the socialist period. Alongside this rush of published work, historians and anthropologists began numerous oral history projects devoted to recording ordinary people's experiences of state socialism. This need to narrate one's own past and capture the memories of those who witnessed the tragedies of the twentieth century continues to the present day. The turn to autobiography and personal narrative inspired the theme section in this issue of Aspasia: women's autobiographical writing and correspondence. The authors in this section look at such texts in an array of historical se ings. The first two articles examine women's autobiographical writing in the second half of the nineteenth century. Eve Annuk analyzes the work of Estonia's first feminist, the educator and journalist Lilli Suburg. The pioneering Suburg was harshly criticized for starting a magazine with the goal of educating women about nationalism and feminism in the 1880s--a time when most Estonians thought women's http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aspasia Berghahn Books

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Publisher
Berghahn Books
Copyright
© 2022 Berghahn Books
ISSN
1933-2882
eISSN
1933-2890
DOI
10.3167/asp.2013.070101
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In the years a er the fall of communist governments in Central, Eastern, and Southeastern Europe (CESEE), a flood of memoir literature began to fill bookstores around the region. Some of these books were newly wri en, others had been composed long ago but could not be published during the socialist period. Alongside this rush of published work, historians and anthropologists began numerous oral history projects devoted to recording ordinary people's experiences of state socialism. This need to narrate one's own past and capture the memories of those who witnessed the tragedies of the twentieth century continues to the present day. The turn to autobiography and personal narrative inspired the theme section in this issue of Aspasia: women's autobiographical writing and correspondence. The authors in this section look at such texts in an array of historical se ings. The first two articles examine women's autobiographical writing in the second half of the nineteenth century. Eve Annuk analyzes the work of Estonia's first feminist, the educator and journalist Lilli Suburg. The pioneering Suburg was harshly criticized for starting a magazine with the goal of educating women about nationalism and feminism in the 1880s--a time when most Estonians thought women's

Journal

AspasiaBerghahn Books

Published: Mar 1, 2013

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