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Editorial

Editorial The years 1917 and 1918 witnessed the end of the Russian, German, Habsburg, and Ot- toman empires, with huge consequences for European and global history. Yet despite the obvious importance of empires to the history of Central, Eastern, and Southeastern Europe, gendered imperialism—especially within Eastern Europe—has received litt le att ention from scholars. The theme section included here, “Rethinking Empire from Eastern Europe,” for which Susan Zimmermann served as guest editor, aims to begin addressing this omission. The call for papers for “Rethinking Empire from Eastern Europe” highlighted four research lacunae. First, although scholars have investigated the entanglement of gender and nationalism in Eastern Europe, this has primarily been done within the context of emerging national movements that challenged the imperial order. There is hardly any research on gender within that imperial order. How, for example, might we think about the relationship between gender and identity within the community of the Kaisertreu (those loyal to the Habsburg Monarchy)? Second, there has been litt le integrative research that considers gender in relation to competing and parallel im- perialisms within the region. By the middle of the nineteenth century, the East Euro- pean empires had a secondary global status compared to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aspasia Berghahn Books

Editorial

Aspasia , Volume 9 (1): 3 – Mar 1, 2015

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Publisher
Berghahn Books
Copyright
© 2022 Berghahn Books
ISSN
1933-2882
eISSN
1933-2890
DOI
10.3167/asp.2015.090101
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The years 1917 and 1918 witnessed the end of the Russian, German, Habsburg, and Ot- toman empires, with huge consequences for European and global history. Yet despite the obvious importance of empires to the history of Central, Eastern, and Southeastern Europe, gendered imperialism—especially within Eastern Europe—has received litt le att ention from scholars. The theme section included here, “Rethinking Empire from Eastern Europe,” for which Susan Zimmermann served as guest editor, aims to begin addressing this omission. The call for papers for “Rethinking Empire from Eastern Europe” highlighted four research lacunae. First, although scholars have investigated the entanglement of gender and nationalism in Eastern Europe, this has primarily been done within the context of emerging national movements that challenged the imperial order. There is hardly any research on gender within that imperial order. How, for example, might we think about the relationship between gender and identity within the community of the Kaisertreu (those loyal to the Habsburg Monarchy)? Second, there has been litt le integrative research that considers gender in relation to competing and parallel im- perialisms within the region. By the middle of the nineteenth century, the East Euro- pean empires had a secondary global status compared to

Journal

AspasiaBerghahn Books

Published: Mar 1, 2015

There are no references for this article.