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Defying Death: Women's Experience of the Holodomor, 1932–1933

Defying Death: Women's Experience of the Holodomor, 1932–1933 Although the tragedy of the Holodomor (the Great Famine) of 1932 and 1933 figures prominently in public discourse and historical scholarship in Ukraine today, its gender dimension has not yet been examined. This article is based on an analysis of personal narratives of female survivors of the Holodomor, collected and published in Ukraine since the 1990s until now. It focuses on the peculiarities of women's experience of the Holodomor and explores women's strategies of resistance and survival in the harsh circumstances of genocide. It exposes a spectrum of women's agency at the grassroots and illuminates controversies around women's ways of coping with starvation. The article also discusses the methodological challenges and ethical issues faced by a Ukrainian female scholar studying women's experiences of famine. KEYWORDS: anthropology of famine, genocide, Holodomor, resistance, survival, Ukraine, women's agency, women's experiences The First Five-Year Plan (1928­1932), which was designed to strengthen the Soviet economy, represented a radical change in economic strategy and policies. The Plan focused on making the Soviet Union militarily, industrially, and financially self-sufficient, thus showcasing the advantages of socialism. One of its primary objectives was to build up the country's heavy industry. The state also sought increased control over http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aspasia Berghahn Books

Defying Death: Women's Experience of the Holodomor, 1932–1933

Aspasia , Volume 7 (1) – Mar 1, 2013

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Publisher
Berghahn Books
Copyright
© 2022 Berghahn Books
ISSN
1933-2882
eISSN
1933-2890
DOI
10.3167/asp.2013.070104
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Although the tragedy of the Holodomor (the Great Famine) of 1932 and 1933 figures prominently in public discourse and historical scholarship in Ukraine today, its gender dimension has not yet been examined. This article is based on an analysis of personal narratives of female survivors of the Holodomor, collected and published in Ukraine since the 1990s until now. It focuses on the peculiarities of women's experience of the Holodomor and explores women's strategies of resistance and survival in the harsh circumstances of genocide. It exposes a spectrum of women's agency at the grassroots and illuminates controversies around women's ways of coping with starvation. The article also discusses the methodological challenges and ethical issues faced by a Ukrainian female scholar studying women's experiences of famine. KEYWORDS: anthropology of famine, genocide, Holodomor, resistance, survival, Ukraine, women's agency, women's experiences The First Five-Year Plan (1928­1932), which was designed to strengthen the Soviet economy, represented a radical change in economic strategy and policies. The Plan focused on making the Soviet Union militarily, industrially, and financially self-sufficient, thus showcasing the advantages of socialism. One of its primary objectives was to build up the country's heavy industry. The state also sought increased control over

Journal

AspasiaBerghahn Books

Published: Mar 1, 2013

Keywords: anthropology of famine; genocide; Holodomor; resistance; survival; Ukraine; women's agency; women's experiences

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