Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Crossing Boundaries: The Case of Wanda Wasilewska and Polish Communism

Crossing Boundaries: The Case of Wanda Wasilewska and Polish Communism The article sketches “a personal genealogy” of Wanda Wasilewska (1905-1964): a writer, a devoted communist, and head of Związek Patriotów Polskich (Union of Polish Patriots) in the USSR during World War II. Referring to Michel Foucault’s lectures on “revolution which becomes an existential project,” the author frames Wasilewska neither as a communist icon nor as a symbol of national betrayal, but instead as a living human being, a social actor, a person strongly embedded in the historical and geopolitical context of her era. The author reconstructs the process of shaping the communist identity in prewar Poland, points to the moments of transgressing subsequent boundaries—gender, national, and class—and uncovers a gradual exploring of the limits of the communist transgression by the protagonist. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aspasia Berghahn Books

Crossing Boundaries: The Case of Wanda Wasilewska and Polish Communism

Aspasia , Volume 11 (1): 35 – Mar 1, 2017

Loading next page...
 
/lp/berghahn-books/crossing-boundaries-the-case-of-wanda-wasilewska-and-polish-communism-wgqITw8CSk

References

References for this paper are not available at this time. We will be adding them shortly, thank you for your patience.

Publisher
Berghahn Books
Copyright
© 2022 Berghahn Books
ISSN
1933-2882
eISSN
1933-2890
DOI
10.3167/asp.2017.110103
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The article sketches “a personal genealogy” of Wanda Wasilewska (1905-1964): a writer, a devoted communist, and head of Związek Patriotów Polskich (Union of Polish Patriots) in the USSR during World War II. Referring to Michel Foucault’s lectures on “revolution which becomes an existential project,” the author frames Wasilewska neither as a communist icon nor as a symbol of national betrayal, but instead as a living human being, a social actor, a person strongly embedded in the historical and geopolitical context of her era. The author reconstructs the process of shaping the communist identity in prewar Poland, points to the moments of transgressing subsequent boundaries—gender, national, and class—and uncovers a gradual exploring of the limits of the communist transgression by the protagonist.

Journal

AspasiaBerghahn Books

Published: Mar 1, 2017

Keywords: boundaries; communism; gender; homeland; personal genealogy; revolution; transgression

There are no references for this article.