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Universal Design: Implications for Computing Education

Universal Design: Implications for Computing Education Universal Design: Implications for Computing Education SHERYL BURGSTAHLER, University of Washington, Seattle Universal design (UD), a concept that grew from the eld of architecture, has recently emerged as a paradigm for designing instructional methods, curriculum, and assessments that are welcoming and accessible to students with a wide range of characteristics, including those related to race, ethnicity, native language, gender, age, and disability. This proactive approach holds promise for more fully including underrepresented groups in computing studies and for decreasing the need, and thus costs, for academic accommodations for students with disabilities. This article summarizes the history and development of UD, references research and practices that support the UD approach, provides examples of the strategies that apply UD to instruction and assessment, and recommends topics for future research. Although the application of UD to teaching and learning is in its infancy, the potential of UD to improve computing instruction should not be ignored. Further research could test the ef cacy of speci c UD practices in promoting learning in computing elds. Categories and Subject Descriptors: K.3.2 [Computer and Information Science Education]: General Terms: Human Factors Additional Key Words and Phrases: Disability, accessibility, universal design, instruction, teaching, assessment ACM Reference http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png ACM Transactions on Computing Education (TOCE) Association for Computing Machinery

Universal Design: Implications for Computing Education

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Publisher
Association for Computing Machinery
Copyright
Copyright © 2011 by ACM Inc.
ISSN
1946-6226
DOI
10.1145/2037276.2037283
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Universal Design: Implications for Computing Education SHERYL BURGSTAHLER, University of Washington, Seattle Universal design (UD), a concept that grew from the eld of architecture, has recently emerged as a paradigm for designing instructional methods, curriculum, and assessments that are welcoming and accessible to students with a wide range of characteristics, including those related to race, ethnicity, native language, gender, age, and disability. This proactive approach holds promise for more fully including underrepresented groups in computing studies and for decreasing the need, and thus costs, for academic accommodations for students with disabilities. This article summarizes the history and development of UD, references research and practices that support the UD approach, provides examples of the strategies that apply UD to instruction and assessment, and recommends topics for future research. Although the application of UD to teaching and learning is in its infancy, the potential of UD to improve computing instruction should not be ignored. Further research could test the ef cacy of speci c UD practices in promoting learning in computing elds. Categories and Subject Descriptors: K.3.2 [Computer and Information Science Education]: General Terms: Human Factors Additional Key Words and Phrases: Disability, accessibility, universal design, instruction, teaching, assessment ACM Reference

Journal

ACM Transactions on Computing Education (TOCE)Association for Computing Machinery

Published: Oct 1, 2011

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