Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The Role of Majority Groups in Diversity Programs

The Role of Majority Groups in Diversity Programs The Role of Majority Groups in Diversity Programs PENNY RHEINGANS, ANNE BRODSKY, JILL SCHEIBLER, and ANNE SPENCE, University of Maryland Baltimore County The underrepresentation of women in technical elds is a widely acknowledged national problem, limiting both the raw size of the talent pool and the diversity of experiences and perspectives of those who will design solutions to key problems facing society. Empowering women to succeed in these elds is clearly one important component of any solution. Because the population in those elds will likely continue to be overwhelmingly male for some time to come, men must also be a key component of the solution. Speci cally, since the attitudes of the majority group are a strong determinant of climate, it is almost equally important to foster a population of men supportive of increasing the representation of women. As at most universities and technical companies, women are a minority in all majors in the University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC) College of Engineering and Information Technology (COEIT). In most majors, they are a small minority. The UMBC Center for Women and Information Technology (CWIT) is dedicated to increasing the representation of women in engineering and information technology elds. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png ACM Transactions on Computing Education (TOCE) Association for Computing Machinery

Loading next page...
 
/lp/association-for-computing-machinery/the-role-of-majority-groups-in-diversity-programs-LtXWfOpoAR
Publisher
Association for Computing Machinery
Copyright
Copyright © 2011 by ACM Inc.
ISSN
1946-6226
DOI
10.1145/1993069.1993075
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Role of Majority Groups in Diversity Programs PENNY RHEINGANS, ANNE BRODSKY, JILL SCHEIBLER, and ANNE SPENCE, University of Maryland Baltimore County The underrepresentation of women in technical elds is a widely acknowledged national problem, limiting both the raw size of the talent pool and the diversity of experiences and perspectives of those who will design solutions to key problems facing society. Empowering women to succeed in these elds is clearly one important component of any solution. Because the population in those elds will likely continue to be overwhelmingly male for some time to come, men must also be a key component of the solution. Speci cally, since the attitudes of the majority group are a strong determinant of climate, it is almost equally important to foster a population of men supportive of increasing the representation of women. As at most universities and technical companies, women are a minority in all majors in the University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC) College of Engineering and Information Technology (COEIT). In most majors, they are a small minority. The UMBC Center for Women and Information Technology (CWIT) is dedicated to increasing the representation of women in engineering and information technology elds.

Journal

ACM Transactions on Computing Education (TOCE)Association for Computing Machinery

Published: Jul 1, 2011

References