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People, sensors, decisions: Customizable and adaptive technologies for assistance in healthcare

People, sensors, decisions: Customizable and adaptive technologies for assistance in healthcare People, Sensors, Decisions: Customizable and Adaptive Technologies for Assistance in Healthcare JESSE HOEY, University of Waterloo CRAIG BOUTILIER, University of Toronto PASCAL POUPART, University of Waterloo PATRICK OLIVIER, Newcastle University ANDREW MONK, University of York ALEX MIHAILIDIS, University of Toronto The ratio of healthcare professionals to care recipients is dropping at an alarming rate, particularly for the older population. It is estimated that the number of persons with Alzheimer's disease, for example, will top 100 million worldwide by the year 2050 [Alzheimer's Disease International 2009]. It will become harder and harder to provide needed health services to this population of older adults. Further, patients are becoming more aware and involved in their own healthcare decisions. This is creating a void in which technology has an increasingly important role to play as a tool to connect providers with recipients. Examples of interactive technologies range from telecare for remote regions to computer games promoting fitness in the home. Currently, such technologies are developed for specific applications and are difficult to modify to suit individual user needs. The future potential economic and social impact of technology in the healthcare field therefore lies in our ability to make intelligent devices that are http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png ACM Transactions on Interactive Intelligent Systems (TiiS) Association for Computing Machinery

People, sensors, decisions: Customizable and adaptive technologies for assistance in healthcare

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Publisher
Association for Computing Machinery
Copyright
Copyright © 2012 by ACM Inc.
ISSN
2160-6455
DOI
10.1145/2395123.2395125
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

People, Sensors, Decisions: Customizable and Adaptive Technologies for Assistance in Healthcare JESSE HOEY, University of Waterloo CRAIG BOUTILIER, University of Toronto PASCAL POUPART, University of Waterloo PATRICK OLIVIER, Newcastle University ANDREW MONK, University of York ALEX MIHAILIDIS, University of Toronto The ratio of healthcare professionals to care recipients is dropping at an alarming rate, particularly for the older population. It is estimated that the number of persons with Alzheimer's disease, for example, will top 100 million worldwide by the year 2050 [Alzheimer's Disease International 2009]. It will become harder and harder to provide needed health services to this population of older adults. Further, patients are becoming more aware and involved in their own healthcare decisions. This is creating a void in which technology has an increasingly important role to play as a tool to connect providers with recipients. Examples of interactive technologies range from telecare for remote regions to computer games promoting fitness in the home. Currently, such technologies are developed for specific applications and are difficult to modify to suit individual user needs. The future potential economic and social impact of technology in the healthcare field therefore lies in our ability to make intelligent devices that are

Journal

ACM Transactions on Interactive Intelligent Systems (TiiS)Association for Computing Machinery

Published: Dec 1, 2012

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