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Measuring and Understanding Team Development by Capturing Self-assessed Enthusiasm and Skill Levels

Measuring and Understanding Team Development by Capturing Self-assessed Enthusiasm and Skill Levels Measuring and Understanding Team Development by Capturing Self-assessed Enthusiasm and Skill Levels DAVID L. LARGENT, Ball State University To prepare graduates for today's work environment, they must be immersed in positive (and perhaps negative) small group experiences in their courses, which will in turn provide a basic understanding of how teams form and develop over time. In the fall of 2009, we started exploring how software development teams form and interact in a computer science college capstone course setting. Our initial findings were presented at ICER 2010 in Aarhus, Denmark. The focus of our research was on the experiences of computer science college course teams as compared and contrasted to the theory of Bruce Tuckman's stages of small group development model, which he characterized as forming, storming, norming, performing, and adjourning. We continued data collection with the computer science capstone course in the fall of 2010 and added an information systems capstone course as well. At the conclusion of the spring 2014 semester, we have collected and analyzed data for a total of 5 academic years from nine cohorts of students taught by five instructors involving 215 students on 51 teams. Each year, participants repeatedly self-assessed their enthusiasm http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png ACM Transactions on Computing Education (TOCE) Association for Computing Machinery

Measuring and Understanding Team Development by Capturing Self-assessed Enthusiasm and Skill Levels

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Publisher
Association for Computing Machinery
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 by ACM Inc.
ISSN
1946-6226
DOI
10.1145/2791394
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Measuring and Understanding Team Development by Capturing Self-assessed Enthusiasm and Skill Levels DAVID L. LARGENT, Ball State University To prepare graduates for today's work environment, they must be immersed in positive (and perhaps negative) small group experiences in their courses, which will in turn provide a basic understanding of how teams form and develop over time. In the fall of 2009, we started exploring how software development teams form and interact in a computer science college capstone course setting. Our initial findings were presented at ICER 2010 in Aarhus, Denmark. The focus of our research was on the experiences of computer science college course teams as compared and contrasted to the theory of Bruce Tuckman's stages of small group development model, which he characterized as forming, storming, norming, performing, and adjourning. We continued data collection with the computer science capstone course in the fall of 2010 and added an information systems capstone course as well. At the conclusion of the spring 2014 semester, we have collected and analyzed data for a total of 5 academic years from nine cohorts of students taught by five instructors involving 215 students on 51 teams. Each year, participants repeatedly self-assessed their enthusiasm

Journal

ACM Transactions on Computing Education (TOCE)Association for Computing Machinery

Published: Mar 8, 2016

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