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Clique: a conversant, task-based audio display for GUI applications

Clique: a conversant, task-based audio display for GUI applications The purpose of the Clique project is to explore a new way of adapting applications with graphical user interfaces (GUIs) for use in audio. Existing adaptation methods retain the components and metaphors of visual interfaces in the audio displays they produce. Clique, on the other hand, presents the user with a conversational audio display based on the tasks supported by programs, not their visual representations. The user interacts solely with this audio display while Clique takes charge of inspecting and controlling the underlying programs via their GUIs. In effect, the graphical nature of program interfaces is hidden from the listening user who is free to concentrate on his or her tasks in audio. We hypothesize that audio displays produced in this manner will prove more effective and satisfying for common tasks than current solutions. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png ACM SIGACCESS Accessibility and Computing Association for Computing Machinery

Clique: a conversant, task-based audio display for GUI applications

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Publisher
Association for Computing Machinery
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 by ACM Inc.
ISSN
1558-2337
DOI
10.1145/1127564.1127571
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The purpose of the Clique project is to explore a new way of adapting applications with graphical user interfaces (GUIs) for use in audio. Existing adaptation methods retain the components and metaphors of visual interfaces in the audio displays they produce. Clique, on the other hand, presents the user with a conversational audio display based on the tasks supported by programs, not their visual representations. The user interacts solely with this audio display while Clique takes charge of inspecting and controlling the underlying programs via their GUIs. In effect, the graphical nature of program interfaces is hidden from the listening user who is free to concentrate on his or her tasks in audio. We hypothesize that audio displays produced in this manner will prove more effective and satisfying for common tasks than current solutions.

Journal

ACM SIGACCESS Accessibility and ComputingAssociation for Computing Machinery

Published: Jan 1, 2006

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