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Accessibility of computer therapy and technology for people with aphasia

Accessibility of computer therapy and technology for people with aphasia Accessibility of Computer Therapy and Technology for People with Aphasia Abi Roper Division of Language and Communication Science & Centre for Human Computer Interaction Design City University London Northampton Square, London, EC1V 0HB, UK Abi.Roper.1@city.ac.uk Abstract Language difficulties present within aphasia can substantially affect a user's ability to access and interact with technology. Surprisingly however, there is comparatively little research into the impact of this condition upon accessibility. The described project aims to examine general technology access and confidence in users with aphasia. It additionally seeks to shed light on the specific cognitive and linguistic factors affecting rehabilitative therapy technology use. Using an interdisciplinary approach, outcomes are intended to provide new language and technology insights to both the accessibility and the speech and language therapy communities. Overview Aphasia affects an estimated 1 million people in America (NAA, 2013) and 250,000 in the United Kingdom (Connect, 2013). It impairs people's ability to use language without affecting their general intelligence. It can affect speaking, understanding reading and/or writing and is caused by brain injury ­ most commonly stroke - with approximately 1/3 of people who have had a stroke being affected (Connect, 2013). Speech and Language Therapists aim to improve http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png ACM SIGACCESS Accessibility and Computing Association for Computing Machinery

Accessibility of computer therapy and technology for people with aphasia

ACM SIGACCESS Accessibility and Computing , Volume (108) – Jan 1, 2014

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Publisher
Association for Computing Machinery
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 by ACM Inc.
ISSN
1558-2337
DOI
10.1145/2591357.2591366
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Accessibility of Computer Therapy and Technology for People with Aphasia Abi Roper Division of Language and Communication Science & Centre for Human Computer Interaction Design City University London Northampton Square, London, EC1V 0HB, UK Abi.Roper.1@city.ac.uk Abstract Language difficulties present within aphasia can substantially affect a user's ability to access and interact with technology. Surprisingly however, there is comparatively little research into the impact of this condition upon accessibility. The described project aims to examine general technology access and confidence in users with aphasia. It additionally seeks to shed light on the specific cognitive and linguistic factors affecting rehabilitative therapy technology use. Using an interdisciplinary approach, outcomes are intended to provide new language and technology insights to both the accessibility and the speech and language therapy communities. Overview Aphasia affects an estimated 1 million people in America (NAA, 2013) and 250,000 in the United Kingdom (Connect, 2013). It impairs people's ability to use language without affecting their general intelligence. It can affect speaking, understanding reading and/or writing and is caused by brain injury ­ most commonly stroke - with approximately 1/3 of people who have had a stroke being affected (Connect, 2013). Speech and Language Therapists aim to improve

Journal

ACM SIGACCESS Accessibility and ComputingAssociation for Computing Machinery

Published: Jan 1, 2014

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