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The solution to an unresolved problem: newly synthesised nanocollagen for the preservation of leather

The solution to an unresolved problem: newly synthesised nanocollagen for the preservation of... A widespread problem in libraries is related to the preservation of book covers in leather that are often torn, powdery and abraded. The same problem is encountered in the conservation of leather goods. Until now a satisfactory solution to contrast the leather deterioration had not been found and the applied conservation methods offered only temporary solutions, without guaranteeing a real and durable effectiveness. At the Istituto centrale restauro e conservazione patrimonio archivistico e librario (Icrcpal) it was decided to research more durable results and to apply nanocollagen solutions to the leather. A new synthesis of nanocollagen was performed in collaboration with Università Tor Vergata, and Fondazione INUIT and the newly synthesised nanocollagen was characterised by different spectroscopic and imaging techniques, then applied to laboratory samples and, at the end th of the research, it was used in the restoration of the leather cover of a 18 book. All the measurements performed on the tested leathers did not show any colour change after nanocollagen application, an increase of all mechanical characteristics and, of paramount importance, an increase in the shrinkage temperature of the leather with a partial reconstitution of its lost elasticity and flexibility. Keywords: Nanocollagen, Synthesis, Leather, Surface, Restoration, Mechanical tests Article history: Received 10 January 2018 st Accepted 1 March 2018 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.culher.2018.03.002 1. Introduction patented (Patent N. 102016000096336, 2016) The preservation of torn, powdery, lacunose, worn, obtaining a nanocollagen with enhanced abraded, weak and friable book-covers in leather is dispersibility in different working media and long- a real problem for library conservators. These kinds term stability of the colloidal phase dispersion (over of deterioration are linked to the ageing, the usage 1 year, at ambient temperature, without precipitation and manipulation of the books, the interactions with of a solid phase). pollutants, but they are also connected with the To assess the final application procedures, the effect products used in the leather manufacture or in the on leather of the newly synthesised nanocollagen, finishing treatments applied for special or decorative soluble both in isopropyl alcohol and in water, was purposes. studied by optical measurements, chemical and Moreover, the choice of the materials for the covers mechanical tests. Moreover different nanocollagen was very often more related to their price than to their concentrations and solvents were tested on durability and permanence. Sheep leather, a less laboratory samples, to determine the minimal durable and stable material in respect to calf or goat amount of product to be applied to the leather with leathers, is one of the most widespread materials in the best consolidation results. th the history of bookbinding, especially from 17 After a preliminary study, an original book was century, due to its lower market price. chosen for the real application. When a cover book is severely deteriorated, a normal manipulation of the book is almost 3. Experimental impossible, without causing the detachment of small fragments or "dust" of leather from the binding, and 3.1. Materials a restoring treatment is needed. At present no satisfactory and durable solutions to 3.1.1. Reagents for the synthesis of Nanocollagen. contrast the leather deterioration have been found, Bovine Collagen Type I (Sigma-Aldrich) was used as but it is possible to apply environmental control molecular precursor for the synthesis of strategies and preventive conservation practices [1]. nanocollagen, performed in acetate buffer aqueous If environmental control is always advisable, the solution 0.1 M, pH 4.7, (Sigma-Aldrich). preventive conservation is rather applicable to Alumina/Al O tracked etched template membranes 2 3 museum objects than to artifacts that should be (Whatman® Anodisc Inorganic Membranes) were consulted and used, such as books. used (membrane diameter 30 mm, pores diameter Since the 70s of the last century 200 nm, pores length 100 µm, pores density 1x10 hydroxypropylcellulose [2] was frequently used for pores/cm ), as well as HNO and NaOH (Sigma- the consolidation of leather. More recently a mixture Aldrich, analytical grade). of waxes and acrylic resin (SC 6000) was proposed and used alone or in mixture with 3.1.2. Laboratory leathers hydroxypropylcellulose [3]. In the preliminary tests, the vegetable tanned th None of these products had the capability to calfskin leather (mean thickness 1.6 mm) of a 18 penetrate into the bulk of the leather that after the century cover, contemporary with the original treatment often showed color changes and volume, was used. For further tests a calfskin grain increased brittleness. split leather (chrome tanned, coloured with soluble The challenge has always been the recovery of aniline dyes, mean thickness 0.66 mm) was flexibility and stability of the degraded leather, employed, because it showed mechanical without altering the appearance and the equilibrium characteristics similar to those of the original cover. of the internal fats and moisture. 3.1.3. Original cover 2. Aim The Estro Poetico Armonico by Benedetto Marcello th The Istituto centrale restauro e conservazione (Mus. 243, 18 century, Biblioteca Casanatense, patrimonio archivistico e librario (Icrcpal) decided, in Roma) was a perfect case study, presenting all the collaboration with the Fondazione INUIT, to damages described in the introduction. It belongs to approach the problem in a different way by using a series of five books with the same binding (first nanomaterials expressly designed for the edition in folio, Venezia, 1724-26), thus allowing for conservation of leather. Nanomaterials can, in fact, a comparison with other original specimens, after the penetrate into the bulk of the treated material, treatment. The cover of Mus. 243 (mean thickness offering a deeper consolidation effect. The idea was 0.60 mm), a vegetable sheepskin leather, tanned to treat the leather with its same principal with hydrolysable tannins, after the manufacture was component, the collagen, synthesised at nanoscale mottled with an acidic solution. dimension and, after a series of laboratory experiments, to apply it in a real restoration case 3.1.4. Tanning detection study. The tanning was detected by specific spot tests: A promising preliminary investigation was performed ferric chloride for vegetable tannins, rhodanine for in 2014 [4, 5], but not implemented. Recently a new hydrolysable tannins, acid butanol for condensed electrochemical synthesis was optimised and tannins, alizarin sulphonate for aluminium detection ranging from 500X to 3000X, following a fixed [6, 7, 8]. measurement grid, before and after the treatment with nanocollagen, which was applied on the sample 3.2. Methods directly in the SEM chamber, in order to repeat the observations after the consolidation, exactly at the 3.2.1. Electrochemical synthesis of nanocollagen. same point observed before the treatment. It was ChronoAmperometry was the electrochemical possible to perform the analyses also on some techniques applied for the synthesis of original fragments spontaneously detached from the nanocollagen. The optimised parameters were binding and no more repositionable. patented in 2016 (Patent N. 102016000096336, 2016) and are briefly discussed below. 3.2.4. FT-IR (Fourier Transform-Infrared The tropocollagen precursor was used at Spectroscopy) concentration 1 mM in 0.1 M acetate buffer solution IR spectra for the nanocollagen structural at pH 4.7. To assemble the Alumina Template characterisation were recorded by a Perkin-Elmer Working Electrodes (ATWEs), it was necessary to Spectrum One FT-IR spectrometer from KBr pellets make the Al O membrane conductive. An Ag layer in N environment. 2 3 2 (20 nm thickness) was then deposited by sputtering for 2 min at 2 mA. During the electrochemical 3.2.5. Colour coordinates synthesis, a constant and controlled working A Minolta Chroma Meter CR22 colorimeter was used potential value of -1.0 V/versus Ag/AgCl/Cl in the CIE L* a* b* space, averaging 3 measurement reference electrode was applied by for each analysed point. Delta E before and after the ChronoAmperometry with deposition time 3600 s treatments was calculated in agreement with under N2 at flow rate of 0.3 cm /min. During the ISO/CIE 11664-6:2014(E) [9]. ChronoAmperometry deposition, the electrolysis solution was magnetically stirred, at ambient 3.2.6. Tear resistance temperature. After the electrochemical synthesis of For the measurements a Buchel Van Der Korput nanocollagen, the silver conductive layer was Tearing Tester (Elmendorf Type) was used. The dissolved in concentrated HNO and the alumina number of samples (h: 60 mm, w: 50 mm) varied as template membrane was removed with concentrated a function of the amount of leather that could be NaOH solution unable to dissolve the nanocollagen subjected to the tests as will be evidenced in the that was rinsed in water until neutrality. Results section. Tear resistance was measured in accordance with T 414 om-12 method [10] that was 3.2.2. TEM (Transmission electron Microscopy) used both to measure the resistance to the formation TEM Philips Electron Optics 301 was employed for of a tear (tear initiation) and the resistance to the the morphological study of nanocollagen samples expansion of a tear (tear propagation). prepared by coating Cu grids (φ=3mm), by deep It was decided to extend to leather a method coating in 0.7 mg/ml of nanocollagen dispersion. normally used for paper, because the standardised After immersion, the coated Cu grids were dried methods for leather are conceived for commercial under Wood lamp. products with higher mechanical characteristics in respect to those of the samples chosen to simulate 3.2.3. SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy) the original cover. For the morphological characterisation of nanocollagen a FE-SEM/EDX, LEO 1550 equipped 3.2.7. Tensile force with a sputter coater (Edwards Scan Coat K550X) For the measurements an Instron Tensile Tester was used. A volume of 5 μL of the nanocollagen Model 1026 was used with: load cell 0.49 kN at full dispersion was deposited on Si(111), allowing the scale, load range adjustable with a scale selector, solvent to evaporate at room temperature, and then crosshead speed 100 mm/min. The dimensions of fixed on aluminium stub with carbon tape. The the samples were: h 200 mm, w 15 mm; useful length samples were then coated with Au layer (thickness 150 mm. 10-20 nm), deposited by sputtering for 2 min at 25 mA. 3.2.8. Bending resistance (Stiffness) For the studies on the application of nanocollagen to For the measurement a Lorentzen & Wettre, Type leather, the SEM analyses were performed with a 10-1 Bending Tester was used. Carl-Zeiss EVO 50 instrument equipped with both a The samples had dimensions 70 mm (h) and 38 mm detector for electron-backscattered diffraction (BSD) (w) and the measurements were carried out with a and for Secondary Electron scanning in Variable bending angle φ 30° and bending length 25 mm. The Pressure mode (VPSE). SEM observations were number of samples varied as a function of the performed at 20 kV accelerating voltage with a amount of leather that could be subjected to the tests tungsten filament. All the samples were mounted on as will be evidenced in the Results section. Al stubs and observed at different magnification Fig. 1. Characterisation study of the new nanocollagen. (a): SEM micrograph of a typical bundle of tropocollagen, molecular precursor for the synthesis of collagen nanotubes. (b): Single fibre from tropocollagen bundles, before the electrochemical template synthesis route. (c): TEM of the new synthesised nanocollagen; (d): FTIR spectrum of the new nanocollagen samples. Wavelength of the characteristic collagen peaks are reported. 3.2.9. pH and pH difference The samples were observed under a Leica DMLP pH of the original cover was measured by a portable microscope in transmitted light, at 50X magnification Crison pH-25 equipped with a flat membrane glass and video recorded by Leica MC 170 HD. Video electrode 5027, after extraction of 0.25 g of leather in recording allowed for the accurate verification of the 5 ml water. pH difference was measured by diluting temperature at which shrinkage events occurs. The 10 times the solution used for pH measurements method is described in ISO 3380:2015 [12] but had (cold extraction standard test ISO 4045:2008 [11]). been modified in order to be applied in conservation field, where only small amount of material can be 3.2.10. Shrinkage temperature examined [13, 14]. In this work the modified method was applied. Very small amount of fibres were removed from the flesh side of the leather, wetted with distilled water for 3.2.11. Microscopy 10 min on a single concave microscope slide. The fibres were then separated with a needle, covered To determine the animal species, the analysis of the hairs follicular patterns of the leathers was performed. with water and a coverslip. The microscope slide was placed on the hot table Mettler FP82 Hot Stage, The different leathers were observed with a Leica Macroscope M420, using cold incident light produced thermostatically controlled through a Mettler FP90 Central Processor, and heated at a rate of 2°C/min. by optical fibres. 4. Results and Discussion unique result that can be inferred is that the samples The experimental work has been divided in different treated with nanocollagen in hydroalcoholic solution steps that will be discussed in separate paragraphs. (0.7 mg / ml) presented a better homogeneity regards the tensile stress. 4.1. Characterisation of nanocollagen Fig. 1 shows the SEM and TEM morphological Table 2 characterisation of the tropocollagen precursor Tensile force and breaking time of samples th before its modification into nanocollagen, and the from a 18 century leather cover, before and nanocollagen final product. Fig. 1a, shows a typical after treatment with nanocollagen bundle of tropocollagen fibres, one of which is Non-treated samples reported at higher magnification in Fig. 1b to evidence its typical cylindrical shape. After the electrochemical Sample Force (N) Breaking time (s) tracked etched membrane template synthesis 1 78.5 12.2 approach, the cylindrical fibre exhibits nanometer 2 145.1 14.5 dimensions: inner diameter 100 nm, external 3 35.3 4.8 diameter 260 nm (Fig. 1c, TEM micrograph). FTIR 4 54.9 6 spectrum (Fig. 1d) confirms that the chemical Samples treated with nanocollagen 0.7 mg/ml structure of the tropocollagen precursor (Collagen in isopropyl alcohol/water Type I) is preserved after the synthesis. In particular, 70/30 (V/V) solution -1 the band centred around 1635 cm , is the typical absorption of Amide I [15, 16] due to the stretching Sample Force (N) Breaking time (s) vibration of the peptide carbonyl group (-C(=O)-). 5 59.8 8.3 The spectral assignments are reported in Table S1, 6 59.8 8 ESI section. 7 59.8 7 8 113.8 11 4.2. Application on leather - preliminary investigation Samples treated with nanocollagen 1 mg/ml To evaluate the effect of nanocollagen on the leather, in isopropyl alcohol/water mechanical, optical and microscopic tests (tensile 70/30 (V/V) solution force, stiffness, colour coordinates, SEM imaging) th were performed on a 18 century and no more usable Sample Force (N) Breaking time (s) leather cover book, chosen to simulate the original 9 51.0 6 document. The cover was divided into 4 samples 10 19.6 2.5 sets. Three sets were treated with different 11 66.7 8.2 nanocollagen solution (Table 1), one was left 12 53.0 7.1 untreated, and used as control. Samples treated with nanocollagen 1 mg/ml in water solution Table 1 Solutions used in the preliminary investigation on a Sample Force (N) Breaking time (s) th 18 century leather cover 13 41.2 4.2 Solvent(s) nanocollagen 14 58.6 6 concentration 15 80.4 8.2 isopropyl alcohol/water 0.7 mg/ml. 16 127.5 13 70/30 (V/V) isopropyl alcohol/water 1 mg/ml 70/30 (V/V) The binding measurements (Table 3) did not show a water 1 mg/ml great variation in stiffness before and after all the treatments. The slight increase noticed after the The different nanocollagen concentration(s) and nanoparticles application is ascribable to the addition solvent(s) were chosen to determine both the best of nanocollagen fibres to the leather, which filled the solvent and the more suitable concentration to be inter-fibres cavities. This result is particularly positive applied in the consolidation treatments. Due to the because consolidation treatments should not cause reduced amount of leather it was only possible to an excessive increase in the material rigidity that obtain 16 samples for the tensile force measurements could lead to the breaking of the leather under stress and 6 samples for stiffness. The results are reported and manipulation. in Tables 2 and 3. Table 4 contains the averaged values (4 samples for Concerning the tensile stress measurements (Table each nanocollagen solution) of colour coordinate and 2), the unevenness of the ancient cover, caused by Delta E, before and after application of the different the widespread walkways across the surface, gave solutions of nanocollagen. None of the treatments randomly distributed values. For this reason, only the induced noticeable colour variations, except a light recorded values are reported, without statistical decrease of luminosity. Also for colorimetric treatment, as well as for binding measurements. The measures better results with lower optical impact were obtained when the hydroalcoholic solution 0.7 The SEM analyses showed the reconstructing effect mg/ml was used. due to the nanoparticles application: the cover margin The positive effect of nanocollagen treatment with all that was disordered and spread apart prior to the of the applied solutions was clearly highlighted by treatment (Fig. 2 bottom left) appeared rebuilt in its SEM images, as shown in Fig. 2. After the application, integrity (Fig. 2 bottom right) after the treatment. fibres appeared less tangled than before and the leather surface seemed smoother. 4.3. Application on leather - evaluation of the effects of nanocollagen at the working concentration Table 3 The encouraging results obtained in the preliminary th Stiffness of samples from a 18 century leather investigation gave the possibility both to choose the cover, before and after treatment with nanocollagen optimal concentration (0.7 mg/ml in hydroalcoholic solution) and to perform a new series of tests on a Nanocollagen 0.7 mg/ml in isopropyl alcohol/water 70/30 (V/V) more homogeneous set of samples. In this second phase of the research a modern industrial split leather Sample Before treatment After treatment was used. This kind of leather was very thin, almost lacking in the flesh layer and presented mechanical (mN) (mN) 1 877 950 characteristics very similar to those of the original leather needing restoration. In this phase of the work, 2 797 798 tear resistance tests were added to the other Nanocollagen 1 mg/ml mechanical tests to verify the ability of the in isopropyl alcohol/water 70/30 (V/V) nanocollagen solution to reinforce the leather, in particular in regards to its capability to resist to tearing Sample Before treatment (mN) After treatment (mN) stress, an important parameter for the manipulation 3 1127 1187 of real objects. 4 845 939 Table 5 contains the results of the mechanical and Nanocollagen 1 mg/ml optical tests. Only the averaged values are reported, in water as well as the number of samples subjected to the tests. Sample Before treatment (mN) After treatment (mN) As can be seen in Table 5, there is a sensible 5 1197 1212 increase in stiffness after the treatment, indicating an 6 917 1216 increment of the resistance of the material. Fortunately, the recorded absolute values do not correspond to a rigid and breakable leather and the Table 4 increase can be regarded as a positive effect for the Colour coordinates of samples from a 18th century stability of the treated leather. leather cover, before and after treatment with Very positive results were obtained from the tensile nanocollagen. Average on 4 samples for each stress measurements (Table 5). Apart the increase in treatment the force necessary to induce the breaking of the Nanocollagen 0.7 mg/ml sample, the most positive effect is the increment in in isopropyl alcohol/water 70/30 (V/V) the elongation parameter that indicates an augmented elasticity of the treated leather, which can Before After Delta E CIE Coordinate better resist to the mechanical stresses induced by treatment treatment 2000 manipulation. L* 28.32 ± 0.78 28.01 ± 0.79 Concerning tear resistance measures, two different a* 14.31 ± 0.66 14.03 ± 0.75 0.27 kinds of tests were performed: tear propagation and b* 12.66 ± 1.33 12.62 ± 0.41 tear initiation. The first measure simulates a very Nanocollagen 1 mg/ml common problem: the existence of tears in a real in isopropyl alcohol/water 70/30 (V/V) object that can prosecute when the object is manipulated. The second kind of measure gives Before After Delta E CIE Coordinate information on the resistance of the margin of an treatment treatment 2000 object, a cover in this case, both during the L* 32.64 ± 4.05 30.19 ± 4.28 manufacture/restoration and the usage. a* 13.53 ± 1.08 14.32 ± .16 1.92 The tear propagation was measured on single b* 14.63 ± 2.93 14.56 ± 3.42 sample and on two coupled samples. Nanocollagen 1 mg/ml The results (Table 5) show a very important in water increment of the tear resistance after the treatment with nanocollagen, in particular regards the tear Before After Delta E CIE Coordinate initiation. This increase is very positive for the future treatment treatment 2000 manipulation of the original restored artefact. L* 29.64 ± 1.31 29.30 ± 1.62 a* 14.98 ± 0.62 15.38 ± 0.71 0.39 b* 12.86 ± 0.84 13.09 ± 0.96 th Fig. 2. Ancient cover, 18 century. Left side: before treatment with aqueous nanocollagen 1 mg/ml. Right side: after treatment. Top: flesh side of the leather; bottom: grain side. Magnification 500X. Table 5 Mechanical and optical characteristics of the split-leather before and after the treatment with nanocollagen 0.7 mg/ml in isopropyl alcohol/water 70/30 (V/V) Stiffness (mN) Before treatment After treatment 7 ± 2 19 ± 8 Tensile stress Before treatment After treatment Force Breaking time Elongation Force Breaking time Elongation (N) (s) (mm) (N) (s) (mm) 38.9 ± 6.2 41 ± 2 23 ± 2 43.0 ± 5.1 48 ± 5 27 ± 2 Tear propagation (mN) Before treatment After treatment 2126 ± 53 (two coupled samples) 2243 ± 87 (two coupled samples) 3567 ± 90 (single sample) 3782 ± 185 (single sample) Tear initiation (mN) Before treatment After treatment 4081 ± 80 (single sample) 6670 ± 92 (single sample) Colour Coordinates Coordinate Before treatment After treatment Delta E CIE 2000 L+ 28.38 ± 0.26 31.91 ± 0.37 a* 16.77 ± 0.25 15.08 ± 0.22 3.26 b* 22.76 ± 1.96 19.45 ± 0.47 Stiffness: 48 samples. Tensile stress: 30 samples. Tear propagation: 24 samples. Tear initiation: 10 samples. Colorimetric measurements: 24 samples. Values of colour coordinates and Delta E (Table 5) 4.4. Application on leather - final work on the original show that in the case of the split leather the final volume Mus. 243 colour difference is greater than those obtained on All the very positive results, previously reported and th the ancient 18 century cover, probably as a commented, allowed to apply the nanocollagen consequence of the dye used for colouring the solution (0.7 mg/ml in isopropyl alcohol/water 70/30 leather: vegetable in the ancient cover and aniline for (V/V)) to the original cover, after performing SEM the modern split leather. The main difference is imaging analysis on non-repositionable fragments. In related to luminosity that increases after the Fig 3 some images are reported and the arrows treatment. highlight peculiar effects such as the relaxation of the SEM images of the split leather showed the same fibres (Fig 3 top) or the formation of bonds between improvement noticed for the ancient 18th century fibres (Fig. 3 middle) or the filling effect of cover. nanocollagen (Fig. 3 bottom). Fig. 3. Mus. 243. Left side: before treatment with nanocollagen 0.7 mg/ml in isopropyl alcohol/water 70/30 (V/V). Right side: after treatment. Top: flesh side of the leather, magnification 1000X; middle: grain side 3000X, bottom: grain side 3000X. The arrows highlight some peculiar features and the effect of nanocollagen. In addition to mechanical and optical tests, appear as a shrinkage of the fibres, and the measurements of pH, pH difference and shrinkage temperature interval where the shrinkage takes place temperature were performed. is a measure of the physical stability of collagen. Mus. 243 had average pH 4.3. It is well known that in The shrinkage activity of collagen can be divided into the 3-4 pH range leather is unharmed by the acidity five different intervals with different characteristics of [17], and the kind or amount of tannin used in the activity and temperatures. The intervals are manufacturing has little effect on pH, which can also conventionally [14] indicated as: be influenced by the interactions with external factors, - A1 to B1: distinct shrinkage activity is observed in such as light, ionising radiations and pollutants. More individual fibres. TF (Tfirst) is the temperature at which or less weak acids can therefore be formed into the the first shrinkage activity is recorded; TB1 is the leather and their presence can be revealed by pH initial temperature of subsequent B1 activity. difference measures, i.e. the difference between the - B1 to C: shrinkage activity of one fibre (occasionally standardised pH measurement and the pH of the more) immediately followed by shrinkage activity in same solution diluted ten times [11]. This difference another fibre is observed in the temperature interval is ranging from 0 to 1, and a measure between 0.7 from TB1 to TS, where TS (Tshrinkage) represents the and 1 denotes the presence of a certain amount of starting temperature of the main interval C. strong free acids, that can cause red rot degradation, - C to B2: is the main shrinkage interval, and the which is a severe chemical degradation of vegetable- temperature to which this activity begins, is indicated tanned leather due to the used tanning compounds as shrinkage temperature TS. In this interval almost as well as to interactions with atmospheric pollutants all fibres shrink simultaneously and continuously. The [1, 18, 19]. Red-rotted leather have powdery surface, ending temperature of the main shrinkage interval is are quite weak and vulnerable to abrasion or tearing. conventionally indicated as TE (T ). end In the more advanced states, the red-rotted leathers - B2 to A2: shrinkage activity of fibres, which did not became quite red. contract at lower temperature in the previously Even though the cover of Mus. 243 appeared described intervals. Fibres do not shrink powdery and fragile, the pH difference was 0.3 simultaneously (TE to TA2 interval). indicating no risk of red rot degradation. The powdery - A2 to the last event: the shrinkage is going to end, and friable appearance of the cover could be mainly but few fibres contract with a well distinct and not ascribable to the usage of the manuscript over time simultaneous event. The activity stops at the end of and to the acidic treatment to which the cover had this interval TA2-TL, where TL (T ) is the last been subjected to obtain a marbled aspect. temperature at which the last shrinkage is observed. A more valuable indicator of the stability and the The temperature range of the whole observed activity hydrothermal stability of collagen is the measure of is ΔTtotal = TL – TF, whereas the length ΔT= TE-TS the shrinkage temperature [14] that represents a of the C phase corresponds to the shrinkage interval. reliable measure of the degree of deterioration of The hydrothermal stability of the original leather was collagen fibres. For this measurement only very small analysed before and after the nanocollagen amount of material is needed. treatment. The triple helix of collagen consists of polypeptidic Three measures were performed on the original chains held together by hydrogen bonds and cross- leather before and after the treatment with the chosen links to form elongated fibrils, which bond together to nanocollagen solution. Results are reported in Table give rise to fibres with ordered structure. When 6; Fig. 4 shows the shrinkage activity of some fibres heated in water, the hydrogen bonds break and not treated and treated with nanocollagen. collagen deforms to randomly disordered chains in a specific temperature interval. The deformations Table 6 Shrinkage temperatures (°C) of the original leather of Mus. 243 cover, before and after the treatment with nanocollagen 0.7 mg/ml in isopropyl alcohol/water 70/30 (V/V). Average on 3 samples for each treatment. Final Shrinkage Sample Initial temperature of shrinkage intervals shrinkage temperature temperature total interval TF (A1) TB1 (B1) TS (C) TE (B2) TA2 (A2) TL ΔT total non- 33.1 ± 0.6 41.1 ± 1.3 47.6 ± 1.3 70.3 ± 1.1 80.6 ± 4.1 93.5 ± 3.6 60.4 ± 3.0 treated treated 37.2 ± 3.7 41.6 ± 5.2 59.6 ± 4.0 76.8 ± 0.0 77.8 ± 0.5 79.9 ± 0.8 42.7 ± 2.9 TF=Tfirst; TS=Tshrinkage; TE=Tend; TL=Tlast The leather treated with the nanocollagen solution interval ΔT (59.6 - 76.8°C) is shorter for the treated showed a significant increase in the shrinkage leather, indicating an increased uniformity in the temperature: 47.6°C before the treatment and 59.6°C fibres length and arrangement, but occurs at higher after nanocollagen application. The shrinkage Fig. 4. Shrinkage activity of the original Mus. 243 leather. Top: non-treated sample before shrinkage (left) and at the end of the shrinkage activity (right). Bottom: sample treated with nanocollagen solution 0.7 mg/ml in isopropyl alcohol/water 70/30 (V/V) before shrinkage (left) and at the end of the shrinkage activity (right). Magnification 50X. At the end of the shrinkage activity, the non-treated fibres are fragmented and collapsed, while the treated partially maintain their integrity. 5. Conclusions temperatures, highlighting the reconstitution of the The research presented in this paper allowed for the bulk of collagen fibres. synthesis of a new kind of nanostructured nanotubes It is to underline that undamaged standard collagen of collagen especially conceived for the preservation usually shrinks at TS around 65°C [20] not far from of leather artefacts, and able to ensure a real and the values reached by the original leather after the durable effectiveness of the treatment, without treatment with nanocollagen. altering the appearance and the equilibrium of the At the end of all the experimental work, the internal fats and moisture of the leather. nanocollagen solution in isopropyl alcohol/water The nanomaterial was developed to exhibit novel 70/30 (V/V) was applied by spraying to the flesh side characteristics, such as increased strength, flexibility of the Mus. 243 cover. and solubility in unusual solvents. Due to the high brittleness of the cover leather, to The mechanical tests demonstrated a very positive ensure a more effective consolidation, it was decided increase in tensile and tearing resistance, as well as to apply the solution also to the hair side, but, to avoid in bending resistance, high enough to contrast the an excessive increase in stiffness, the solution was weakness of the original artefact, without creating a applied at reduced concentration (0.35 mg/ml). rigid and breakable leather. Moreover nanocollagen, due its capability to link SEM imaging well evidenced the capability of the fibres together, was used to adhere small fragments nanocollagen solution to create bonds between the of the cover, which were partially lifted or detached collagen fibres and to fill the inter-fibres cavities. (Fig. 5). Moreover, after nanocollagen application, the fibres Fig. 5. Top: Area of the leather cover presenting partial detachment and lifting. Bottom: same area after the nanocollagen application. appeared less tangled than before and the leather preliminary study, Journal of the Institute of surface appeared smoother and rebuilt in its integrity. Conservation, 36 (2013) 125-144. The measurements of shrinkage temperature [4] Ilaria Camerini, La conservazione del fondo showed an improvement in the response of collagen Corsini. Volume 157 G 2. Nuove metodologie fibres to the degradation, with a partial reconstitution per il trattamento del Red Rot, (2013-14) Master of the lost elasticity and flexibility. This behaviour can Thesis at Università Tor Vergata (Roma, Italy), be explained as a rehydration and a partial restoration Unpublished. of the triple helixes bonds and the cross-links [5] J. Landoulsi, C.J. Roy, C. Dupont-Gillain, S.D. between the superhelices forming the quaternary Champagne, Synthesis of collagen nanotubes structure of the collagen molecule. with highly regular dimensions through The aforementioned effects made the new membrane-templated layer-by-layer assembly, synthesised nanocollagen particularly suitable for the Biomacromolecules, 10 (2009) 1021-1024. treatment of the volume Mus. 243, which complete [6] [L. Falcão, M.E. Machado Araújo, Tannins restoration is described in a Master Thesis for the characterisation in new and historic vegetable high training school (SAF) of the Istituto centrale tanned leathers fibres by spot tests, Journal of restauro e conservazione patrimonio archivistico e Cultural Heritage 12 (2011) 149-156. librario [21]. [7] K.H. Inoue, A.E. Hagerman, Determination of Further tests of the developed product were gallotannin with rhodanine, Analytical performed by applying it to a very deteriorated leather Biochemistry 169 (1988) 363-369. armchair, with excellent results. [8] L.J. Porter, L.N. Hrstich, B.G. Chan, The The mass production and marketing of the novel conversion of procyanidins and prodelphinidins product is under study. to cyanidin and delphinidin, Phytochemistry 25 (1985) 223-230. [9] ISO/CIE 11664-6:2014(E) Colorimetry – Part 6: CIEDE2000 Colour-Difference Formula. Appendix A. Supplementary data [10] Test Method T 414 om-12 - Internal tearing resistance of paper (Elmendorf-type method). [11] [ISO 4045:2008 (IULTCS/IUC 11) - Leather - References Chemical tests - Determination of pH. [1] C. Dignard, J. Mason, Caring for leather, skin [12] [ISO 3380:2015 (IULTCS/IUP 16) - Leather - and fur,https://www.canada.ca/en/conservation- Physical and mechanical tests - Determination of institute/services/care-objects/leather-feathers- shrinkage temperature up to 100 degrees C. bone/caring-leather-skin-fur.html#a21002. (Last [13] J. Font, J. Espejo, S. Cuadros, M. R. Reyes, A. access March 12th 2018) Bacardit, S. Butì, Comparison of IUP 16 and [2] G. Ruzicka, P. Zyats, S. Reidell, O. Primanis, Microscopic Hot Table Methods for Shrinkage Leather Conservation-booking leather Temperature Determination, Journal of the consolidants, in M. Kite, R. Thompson (eds), Society of Leather Technologists and Chemists Conservation of leather and related materials, 94 (2010) 59-64. Oxford, Elsevier Butterworth- Heinemann, [14] R. Larsen, M. Vest, K. Nielsen, Determination of (2006), 230-232. hydrothermal stability (shrinkage temperature) [3] A. Johnson, Evaluation of the use of SC6000 in of historical leathers by the micro hot table conjunction with Klucel G as a conservation technique. Society of Leather Technologists and treatment for bookbinding leather: notes on a Chemists Journal 77 (1995) 151-156. [15] B. de Campos Vidal, M.L. S. Mello, Collagen [20] [M. Kite, R. Thomson, Conservation of Leather type I amide I band infrared spectroscopy, and Related Materials, Elsevier Butterworth- Micron 42 (2011) 283-289. Heinemann, Oxford 2006. [16] W.H. Tiong, G. Damodaran, H. Naik, J.L. Kelly, [21] Camilla Del Re, Una nuova risorsa per il restauro A. Pandit, Enhancing Amine Terminals in an del cuoio: sperimentazione e applicazione del Amine-Deprived Collagen Matrix, Langmuir 24 nanocollagene nel restauro del volume Mus. 243 (2008) 11752-11761. della Biblioteca Casanatense di Roma, (2015- [17] E.L. Wallace, Method for measuring the pH of 2016) Master Thesis at Istituto centrale per il leather using a simple glass-electrode assembly, restauro e la conservazione del patrimonio Journal of Research of the National Bureau of archivistico e librario, Scuola di Alta Formazione. Standards, 15 (1935) 5-11. Unpublished. [18] Canadian Conservation Institute, Care of alum, vegetable, and mineral tanned leather CCI Notes, 8(2) (1992) 1-4. [19] V. Dirksen, (1997), The Degradation and Conservation of Leather, Journal of Conservation and Museum Studies 3 (1997) 6- 10. DOI: http://doi.org/10.5334/jcms.3972. Supplementary data Confocal Scanning Laser Microscopy (CLSM). Leather samples were analysed with confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM), FV1000 (Olympus Corp., Tokyo, Japan), using laser channels at l excitation 488 nm and emission range 459-494 nm; and at l excitation 635 nm and emission range 606-686 nm. CLSM data are a set of two-dimensional (2D) cross-sectional images in the x-y plane obtained with IMARIS 6.2 software (Bitplane AG, Zurich, Switzerland). A set of three-dimensional (3D) values and cross-sectional images in the xz-yz plane, obtained with IMARIS 6.2 software, were also recorded. Fig. SI1 displays two images of the flesh side of leather non-treated and after application of nanocollagen at concentration 0.7 mg/ml in isopropyl alcohol/water 70/30 (V/V). By comparison between the two images the filling and reconstructing effect of nanocollagen is quite evident; furthermore, after application of the product, the leather surface appears smoother than before. Fig SI1: CLSM images. Left: non-treated leather. Right: the same leather after application of nanocollagen. Magnification 20X. Laser excitation: 635 nm. Attribution of the characteristics bands of nanocollagen by FTIR. Table S1. Infrared spectral absorption bands for the nanocollagen final products. Sample Wavenumber Functional group Reference -1 (cm ) Nanocollagen 3316 N-H stretching Spectrometric Identification of organic 1635 C(=O) Amide I stretching compounds, Seventh Edition, Robert M. Silverstein, 1548 N-H Amide II bending Francis X. Webster 1454 C-N stretching David J. Kiemle 1237 Interaction between N-H bending and C-N stretching http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Condensed Matter arXiv (Cornell University)

The solution to an unresolved problem: newly synthesised nanocollagen for the preservation of leather

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ARCH-3331
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10.1016/j.culher.2018.03.002
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Abstract

A widespread problem in libraries is related to the preservation of book covers in leather that are often torn, powdery and abraded. The same problem is encountered in the conservation of leather goods. Until now a satisfactory solution to contrast the leather deterioration had not been found and the applied conservation methods offered only temporary solutions, without guaranteeing a real and durable effectiveness. At the Istituto centrale restauro e conservazione patrimonio archivistico e librario (Icrcpal) it was decided to research more durable results and to apply nanocollagen solutions to the leather. A new synthesis of nanocollagen was performed in collaboration with Università Tor Vergata, and Fondazione INUIT and the newly synthesised nanocollagen was characterised by different spectroscopic and imaging techniques, then applied to laboratory samples and, at the end th of the research, it was used in the restoration of the leather cover of a 18 book. All the measurements performed on the tested leathers did not show any colour change after nanocollagen application, an increase of all mechanical characteristics and, of paramount importance, an increase in the shrinkage temperature of the leather with a partial reconstitution of its lost elasticity and flexibility. Keywords: Nanocollagen, Synthesis, Leather, Surface, Restoration, Mechanical tests Article history: Received 10 January 2018 st Accepted 1 March 2018 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.culher.2018.03.002 1. Introduction patented (Patent N. 102016000096336, 2016) The preservation of torn, powdery, lacunose, worn, obtaining a nanocollagen with enhanced abraded, weak and friable book-covers in leather is dispersibility in different working media and long- a real problem for library conservators. These kinds term stability of the colloidal phase dispersion (over of deterioration are linked to the ageing, the usage 1 year, at ambient temperature, without precipitation and manipulation of the books, the interactions with of a solid phase). pollutants, but they are also connected with the To assess the final application procedures, the effect products used in the leather manufacture or in the on leather of the newly synthesised nanocollagen, finishing treatments applied for special or decorative soluble both in isopropyl alcohol and in water, was purposes. studied by optical measurements, chemical and Moreover, the choice of the materials for the covers mechanical tests. Moreover different nanocollagen was very often more related to their price than to their concentrations and solvents were tested on durability and permanence. Sheep leather, a less laboratory samples, to determine the minimal durable and stable material in respect to calf or goat amount of product to be applied to the leather with leathers, is one of the most widespread materials in the best consolidation results. th the history of bookbinding, especially from 17 After a preliminary study, an original book was century, due to its lower market price. chosen for the real application. When a cover book is severely deteriorated, a normal manipulation of the book is almost 3. Experimental impossible, without causing the detachment of small fragments or "dust" of leather from the binding, and 3.1. Materials a restoring treatment is needed. At present no satisfactory and durable solutions to 3.1.1. Reagents for the synthesis of Nanocollagen. contrast the leather deterioration have been found, Bovine Collagen Type I (Sigma-Aldrich) was used as but it is possible to apply environmental control molecular precursor for the synthesis of strategies and preventive conservation practices [1]. nanocollagen, performed in acetate buffer aqueous If environmental control is always advisable, the solution 0.1 M, pH 4.7, (Sigma-Aldrich). preventive conservation is rather applicable to Alumina/Al O tracked etched template membranes 2 3 museum objects than to artifacts that should be (Whatman® Anodisc Inorganic Membranes) were consulted and used, such as books. used (membrane diameter 30 mm, pores diameter Since the 70s of the last century 200 nm, pores length 100 µm, pores density 1x10 hydroxypropylcellulose [2] was frequently used for pores/cm ), as well as HNO and NaOH (Sigma- the consolidation of leather. More recently a mixture Aldrich, analytical grade). of waxes and acrylic resin (SC 6000) was proposed and used alone or in mixture with 3.1.2. Laboratory leathers hydroxypropylcellulose [3]. In the preliminary tests, the vegetable tanned th None of these products had the capability to calfskin leather (mean thickness 1.6 mm) of a 18 penetrate into the bulk of the leather that after the century cover, contemporary with the original treatment often showed color changes and volume, was used. For further tests a calfskin grain increased brittleness. split leather (chrome tanned, coloured with soluble The challenge has always been the recovery of aniline dyes, mean thickness 0.66 mm) was flexibility and stability of the degraded leather, employed, because it showed mechanical without altering the appearance and the equilibrium characteristics similar to those of the original cover. of the internal fats and moisture. 3.1.3. Original cover 2. Aim The Estro Poetico Armonico by Benedetto Marcello th The Istituto centrale restauro e conservazione (Mus. 243, 18 century, Biblioteca Casanatense, patrimonio archivistico e librario (Icrcpal) decided, in Roma) was a perfect case study, presenting all the collaboration with the Fondazione INUIT, to damages described in the introduction. It belongs to approach the problem in a different way by using a series of five books with the same binding (first nanomaterials expressly designed for the edition in folio, Venezia, 1724-26), thus allowing for conservation of leather. Nanomaterials can, in fact, a comparison with other original specimens, after the penetrate into the bulk of the treated material, treatment. The cover of Mus. 243 (mean thickness offering a deeper consolidation effect. The idea was 0.60 mm), a vegetable sheepskin leather, tanned to treat the leather with its same principal with hydrolysable tannins, after the manufacture was component, the collagen, synthesised at nanoscale mottled with an acidic solution. dimension and, after a series of laboratory experiments, to apply it in a real restoration case 3.1.4. Tanning detection study. The tanning was detected by specific spot tests: A promising preliminary investigation was performed ferric chloride for vegetable tannins, rhodanine for in 2014 [4, 5], but not implemented. Recently a new hydrolysable tannins, acid butanol for condensed electrochemical synthesis was optimised and tannins, alizarin sulphonate for aluminium detection ranging from 500X to 3000X, following a fixed [6, 7, 8]. measurement grid, before and after the treatment with nanocollagen, which was applied on the sample 3.2. Methods directly in the SEM chamber, in order to repeat the observations after the consolidation, exactly at the 3.2.1. Electrochemical synthesis of nanocollagen. same point observed before the treatment. It was ChronoAmperometry was the electrochemical possible to perform the analyses also on some techniques applied for the synthesis of original fragments spontaneously detached from the nanocollagen. The optimised parameters were binding and no more repositionable. patented in 2016 (Patent N. 102016000096336, 2016) and are briefly discussed below. 3.2.4. FT-IR (Fourier Transform-Infrared The tropocollagen precursor was used at Spectroscopy) concentration 1 mM in 0.1 M acetate buffer solution IR spectra for the nanocollagen structural at pH 4.7. To assemble the Alumina Template characterisation were recorded by a Perkin-Elmer Working Electrodes (ATWEs), it was necessary to Spectrum One FT-IR spectrometer from KBr pellets make the Al O membrane conductive. An Ag layer in N environment. 2 3 2 (20 nm thickness) was then deposited by sputtering for 2 min at 2 mA. During the electrochemical 3.2.5. Colour coordinates synthesis, a constant and controlled working A Minolta Chroma Meter CR22 colorimeter was used potential value of -1.0 V/versus Ag/AgCl/Cl in the CIE L* a* b* space, averaging 3 measurement reference electrode was applied by for each analysed point. Delta E before and after the ChronoAmperometry with deposition time 3600 s treatments was calculated in agreement with under N2 at flow rate of 0.3 cm /min. During the ISO/CIE 11664-6:2014(E) [9]. ChronoAmperometry deposition, the electrolysis solution was magnetically stirred, at ambient 3.2.6. Tear resistance temperature. After the electrochemical synthesis of For the measurements a Buchel Van Der Korput nanocollagen, the silver conductive layer was Tearing Tester (Elmendorf Type) was used. The dissolved in concentrated HNO and the alumina number of samples (h: 60 mm, w: 50 mm) varied as template membrane was removed with concentrated a function of the amount of leather that could be NaOH solution unable to dissolve the nanocollagen subjected to the tests as will be evidenced in the that was rinsed in water until neutrality. Results section. Tear resistance was measured in accordance with T 414 om-12 method [10] that was 3.2.2. TEM (Transmission electron Microscopy) used both to measure the resistance to the formation TEM Philips Electron Optics 301 was employed for of a tear (tear initiation) and the resistance to the the morphological study of nanocollagen samples expansion of a tear (tear propagation). prepared by coating Cu grids (φ=3mm), by deep It was decided to extend to leather a method coating in 0.7 mg/ml of nanocollagen dispersion. normally used for paper, because the standardised After immersion, the coated Cu grids were dried methods for leather are conceived for commercial under Wood lamp. products with higher mechanical characteristics in respect to those of the samples chosen to simulate 3.2.3. SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy) the original cover. For the morphological characterisation of nanocollagen a FE-SEM/EDX, LEO 1550 equipped 3.2.7. Tensile force with a sputter coater (Edwards Scan Coat K550X) For the measurements an Instron Tensile Tester was used. A volume of 5 μL of the nanocollagen Model 1026 was used with: load cell 0.49 kN at full dispersion was deposited on Si(111), allowing the scale, load range adjustable with a scale selector, solvent to evaporate at room temperature, and then crosshead speed 100 mm/min. The dimensions of fixed on aluminium stub with carbon tape. The the samples were: h 200 mm, w 15 mm; useful length samples were then coated with Au layer (thickness 150 mm. 10-20 nm), deposited by sputtering for 2 min at 25 mA. 3.2.8. Bending resistance (Stiffness) For the studies on the application of nanocollagen to For the measurement a Lorentzen & Wettre, Type leather, the SEM analyses were performed with a 10-1 Bending Tester was used. Carl-Zeiss EVO 50 instrument equipped with both a The samples had dimensions 70 mm (h) and 38 mm detector for electron-backscattered diffraction (BSD) (w) and the measurements were carried out with a and for Secondary Electron scanning in Variable bending angle φ 30° and bending length 25 mm. The Pressure mode (VPSE). SEM observations were number of samples varied as a function of the performed at 20 kV accelerating voltage with a amount of leather that could be subjected to the tests tungsten filament. All the samples were mounted on as will be evidenced in the Results section. Al stubs and observed at different magnification Fig. 1. Characterisation study of the new nanocollagen. (a): SEM micrograph of a typical bundle of tropocollagen, molecular precursor for the synthesis of collagen nanotubes. (b): Single fibre from tropocollagen bundles, before the electrochemical template synthesis route. (c): TEM of the new synthesised nanocollagen; (d): FTIR spectrum of the new nanocollagen samples. Wavelength of the characteristic collagen peaks are reported. 3.2.9. pH and pH difference The samples were observed under a Leica DMLP pH of the original cover was measured by a portable microscope in transmitted light, at 50X magnification Crison pH-25 equipped with a flat membrane glass and video recorded by Leica MC 170 HD. Video electrode 5027, after extraction of 0.25 g of leather in recording allowed for the accurate verification of the 5 ml water. pH difference was measured by diluting temperature at which shrinkage events occurs. The 10 times the solution used for pH measurements method is described in ISO 3380:2015 [12] but had (cold extraction standard test ISO 4045:2008 [11]). been modified in order to be applied in conservation field, where only small amount of material can be 3.2.10. Shrinkage temperature examined [13, 14]. In this work the modified method was applied. Very small amount of fibres were removed from the flesh side of the leather, wetted with distilled water for 3.2.11. Microscopy 10 min on a single concave microscope slide. The fibres were then separated with a needle, covered To determine the animal species, the analysis of the hairs follicular patterns of the leathers was performed. with water and a coverslip. The microscope slide was placed on the hot table Mettler FP82 Hot Stage, The different leathers were observed with a Leica Macroscope M420, using cold incident light produced thermostatically controlled through a Mettler FP90 Central Processor, and heated at a rate of 2°C/min. by optical fibres. 4. Results and Discussion unique result that can be inferred is that the samples The experimental work has been divided in different treated with nanocollagen in hydroalcoholic solution steps that will be discussed in separate paragraphs. (0.7 mg / ml) presented a better homogeneity regards the tensile stress. 4.1. Characterisation of nanocollagen Fig. 1 shows the SEM and TEM morphological Table 2 characterisation of the tropocollagen precursor Tensile force and breaking time of samples th before its modification into nanocollagen, and the from a 18 century leather cover, before and nanocollagen final product. Fig. 1a, shows a typical after treatment with nanocollagen bundle of tropocollagen fibres, one of which is Non-treated samples reported at higher magnification in Fig. 1b to evidence its typical cylindrical shape. After the electrochemical Sample Force (N) Breaking time (s) tracked etched membrane template synthesis 1 78.5 12.2 approach, the cylindrical fibre exhibits nanometer 2 145.1 14.5 dimensions: inner diameter 100 nm, external 3 35.3 4.8 diameter 260 nm (Fig. 1c, TEM micrograph). FTIR 4 54.9 6 spectrum (Fig. 1d) confirms that the chemical Samples treated with nanocollagen 0.7 mg/ml structure of the tropocollagen precursor (Collagen in isopropyl alcohol/water Type I) is preserved after the synthesis. In particular, 70/30 (V/V) solution -1 the band centred around 1635 cm , is the typical absorption of Amide I [15, 16] due to the stretching Sample Force (N) Breaking time (s) vibration of the peptide carbonyl group (-C(=O)-). 5 59.8 8.3 The spectral assignments are reported in Table S1, 6 59.8 8 ESI section. 7 59.8 7 8 113.8 11 4.2. Application on leather - preliminary investigation Samples treated with nanocollagen 1 mg/ml To evaluate the effect of nanocollagen on the leather, in isopropyl alcohol/water mechanical, optical and microscopic tests (tensile 70/30 (V/V) solution force, stiffness, colour coordinates, SEM imaging) th were performed on a 18 century and no more usable Sample Force (N) Breaking time (s) leather cover book, chosen to simulate the original 9 51.0 6 document. The cover was divided into 4 samples 10 19.6 2.5 sets. Three sets were treated with different 11 66.7 8.2 nanocollagen solution (Table 1), one was left 12 53.0 7.1 untreated, and used as control. Samples treated with nanocollagen 1 mg/ml in water solution Table 1 Solutions used in the preliminary investigation on a Sample Force (N) Breaking time (s) th 18 century leather cover 13 41.2 4.2 Solvent(s) nanocollagen 14 58.6 6 concentration 15 80.4 8.2 isopropyl alcohol/water 0.7 mg/ml. 16 127.5 13 70/30 (V/V) isopropyl alcohol/water 1 mg/ml 70/30 (V/V) The binding measurements (Table 3) did not show a water 1 mg/ml great variation in stiffness before and after all the treatments. The slight increase noticed after the The different nanocollagen concentration(s) and nanoparticles application is ascribable to the addition solvent(s) were chosen to determine both the best of nanocollagen fibres to the leather, which filled the solvent and the more suitable concentration to be inter-fibres cavities. This result is particularly positive applied in the consolidation treatments. Due to the because consolidation treatments should not cause reduced amount of leather it was only possible to an excessive increase in the material rigidity that obtain 16 samples for the tensile force measurements could lead to the breaking of the leather under stress and 6 samples for stiffness. The results are reported and manipulation. in Tables 2 and 3. Table 4 contains the averaged values (4 samples for Concerning the tensile stress measurements (Table each nanocollagen solution) of colour coordinate and 2), the unevenness of the ancient cover, caused by Delta E, before and after application of the different the widespread walkways across the surface, gave solutions of nanocollagen. None of the treatments randomly distributed values. For this reason, only the induced noticeable colour variations, except a light recorded values are reported, without statistical decrease of luminosity. Also for colorimetric treatment, as well as for binding measurements. The measures better results with lower optical impact were obtained when the hydroalcoholic solution 0.7 The SEM analyses showed the reconstructing effect mg/ml was used. due to the nanoparticles application: the cover margin The positive effect of nanocollagen treatment with all that was disordered and spread apart prior to the of the applied solutions was clearly highlighted by treatment (Fig. 2 bottom left) appeared rebuilt in its SEM images, as shown in Fig. 2. After the application, integrity (Fig. 2 bottom right) after the treatment. fibres appeared less tangled than before and the leather surface seemed smoother. 4.3. Application on leather - evaluation of the effects of nanocollagen at the working concentration Table 3 The encouraging results obtained in the preliminary th Stiffness of samples from a 18 century leather investigation gave the possibility both to choose the cover, before and after treatment with nanocollagen optimal concentration (0.7 mg/ml in hydroalcoholic solution) and to perform a new series of tests on a Nanocollagen 0.7 mg/ml in isopropyl alcohol/water 70/30 (V/V) more homogeneous set of samples. In this second phase of the research a modern industrial split leather Sample Before treatment After treatment was used. This kind of leather was very thin, almost lacking in the flesh layer and presented mechanical (mN) (mN) 1 877 950 characteristics very similar to those of the original leather needing restoration. In this phase of the work, 2 797 798 tear resistance tests were added to the other Nanocollagen 1 mg/ml mechanical tests to verify the ability of the in isopropyl alcohol/water 70/30 (V/V) nanocollagen solution to reinforce the leather, in particular in regards to its capability to resist to tearing Sample Before treatment (mN) After treatment (mN) stress, an important parameter for the manipulation 3 1127 1187 of real objects. 4 845 939 Table 5 contains the results of the mechanical and Nanocollagen 1 mg/ml optical tests. Only the averaged values are reported, in water as well as the number of samples subjected to the tests. Sample Before treatment (mN) After treatment (mN) As can be seen in Table 5, there is a sensible 5 1197 1212 increase in stiffness after the treatment, indicating an 6 917 1216 increment of the resistance of the material. Fortunately, the recorded absolute values do not correspond to a rigid and breakable leather and the Table 4 increase can be regarded as a positive effect for the Colour coordinates of samples from a 18th century stability of the treated leather. leather cover, before and after treatment with Very positive results were obtained from the tensile nanocollagen. Average on 4 samples for each stress measurements (Table 5). Apart the increase in treatment the force necessary to induce the breaking of the Nanocollagen 0.7 mg/ml sample, the most positive effect is the increment in in isopropyl alcohol/water 70/30 (V/V) the elongation parameter that indicates an augmented elasticity of the treated leather, which can Before After Delta E CIE Coordinate better resist to the mechanical stresses induced by treatment treatment 2000 manipulation. L* 28.32 ± 0.78 28.01 ± 0.79 Concerning tear resistance measures, two different a* 14.31 ± 0.66 14.03 ± 0.75 0.27 kinds of tests were performed: tear propagation and b* 12.66 ± 1.33 12.62 ± 0.41 tear initiation. The first measure simulates a very Nanocollagen 1 mg/ml common problem: the existence of tears in a real in isopropyl alcohol/water 70/30 (V/V) object that can prosecute when the object is manipulated. The second kind of measure gives Before After Delta E CIE Coordinate information on the resistance of the margin of an treatment treatment 2000 object, a cover in this case, both during the L* 32.64 ± 4.05 30.19 ± 4.28 manufacture/restoration and the usage. a* 13.53 ± 1.08 14.32 ± .16 1.92 The tear propagation was measured on single b* 14.63 ± 2.93 14.56 ± 3.42 sample and on two coupled samples. Nanocollagen 1 mg/ml The results (Table 5) show a very important in water increment of the tear resistance after the treatment with nanocollagen, in particular regards the tear Before After Delta E CIE Coordinate initiation. This increase is very positive for the future treatment treatment 2000 manipulation of the original restored artefact. L* 29.64 ± 1.31 29.30 ± 1.62 a* 14.98 ± 0.62 15.38 ± 0.71 0.39 b* 12.86 ± 0.84 13.09 ± 0.96 th Fig. 2. Ancient cover, 18 century. Left side: before treatment with aqueous nanocollagen 1 mg/ml. Right side: after treatment. Top: flesh side of the leather; bottom: grain side. Magnification 500X. Table 5 Mechanical and optical characteristics of the split-leather before and after the treatment with nanocollagen 0.7 mg/ml in isopropyl alcohol/water 70/30 (V/V) Stiffness (mN) Before treatment After treatment 7 ± 2 19 ± 8 Tensile stress Before treatment After treatment Force Breaking time Elongation Force Breaking time Elongation (N) (s) (mm) (N) (s) (mm) 38.9 ± 6.2 41 ± 2 23 ± 2 43.0 ± 5.1 48 ± 5 27 ± 2 Tear propagation (mN) Before treatment After treatment 2126 ± 53 (two coupled samples) 2243 ± 87 (two coupled samples) 3567 ± 90 (single sample) 3782 ± 185 (single sample) Tear initiation (mN) Before treatment After treatment 4081 ± 80 (single sample) 6670 ± 92 (single sample) Colour Coordinates Coordinate Before treatment After treatment Delta E CIE 2000 L+ 28.38 ± 0.26 31.91 ± 0.37 a* 16.77 ± 0.25 15.08 ± 0.22 3.26 b* 22.76 ± 1.96 19.45 ± 0.47 Stiffness: 48 samples. Tensile stress: 30 samples. Tear propagation: 24 samples. Tear initiation: 10 samples. Colorimetric measurements: 24 samples. Values of colour coordinates and Delta E (Table 5) 4.4. Application on leather - final work on the original show that in the case of the split leather the final volume Mus. 243 colour difference is greater than those obtained on All the very positive results, previously reported and th the ancient 18 century cover, probably as a commented, allowed to apply the nanocollagen consequence of the dye used for colouring the solution (0.7 mg/ml in isopropyl alcohol/water 70/30 leather: vegetable in the ancient cover and aniline for (V/V)) to the original cover, after performing SEM the modern split leather. The main difference is imaging analysis on non-repositionable fragments. In related to luminosity that increases after the Fig 3 some images are reported and the arrows treatment. highlight peculiar effects such as the relaxation of the SEM images of the split leather showed the same fibres (Fig 3 top) or the formation of bonds between improvement noticed for the ancient 18th century fibres (Fig. 3 middle) or the filling effect of cover. nanocollagen (Fig. 3 bottom). Fig. 3. Mus. 243. Left side: before treatment with nanocollagen 0.7 mg/ml in isopropyl alcohol/water 70/30 (V/V). Right side: after treatment. Top: flesh side of the leather, magnification 1000X; middle: grain side 3000X, bottom: grain side 3000X. The arrows highlight some peculiar features and the effect of nanocollagen. In addition to mechanical and optical tests, appear as a shrinkage of the fibres, and the measurements of pH, pH difference and shrinkage temperature interval where the shrinkage takes place temperature were performed. is a measure of the physical stability of collagen. Mus. 243 had average pH 4.3. It is well known that in The shrinkage activity of collagen can be divided into the 3-4 pH range leather is unharmed by the acidity five different intervals with different characteristics of [17], and the kind or amount of tannin used in the activity and temperatures. The intervals are manufacturing has little effect on pH, which can also conventionally [14] indicated as: be influenced by the interactions with external factors, - A1 to B1: distinct shrinkage activity is observed in such as light, ionising radiations and pollutants. More individual fibres. TF (Tfirst) is the temperature at which or less weak acids can therefore be formed into the the first shrinkage activity is recorded; TB1 is the leather and their presence can be revealed by pH initial temperature of subsequent B1 activity. difference measures, i.e. the difference between the - B1 to C: shrinkage activity of one fibre (occasionally standardised pH measurement and the pH of the more) immediately followed by shrinkage activity in same solution diluted ten times [11]. This difference another fibre is observed in the temperature interval is ranging from 0 to 1, and a measure between 0.7 from TB1 to TS, where TS (Tshrinkage) represents the and 1 denotes the presence of a certain amount of starting temperature of the main interval C. strong free acids, that can cause red rot degradation, - C to B2: is the main shrinkage interval, and the which is a severe chemical degradation of vegetable- temperature to which this activity begins, is indicated tanned leather due to the used tanning compounds as shrinkage temperature TS. In this interval almost as well as to interactions with atmospheric pollutants all fibres shrink simultaneously and continuously. The [1, 18, 19]. Red-rotted leather have powdery surface, ending temperature of the main shrinkage interval is are quite weak and vulnerable to abrasion or tearing. conventionally indicated as TE (T ). end In the more advanced states, the red-rotted leathers - B2 to A2: shrinkage activity of fibres, which did not became quite red. contract at lower temperature in the previously Even though the cover of Mus. 243 appeared described intervals. Fibres do not shrink powdery and fragile, the pH difference was 0.3 simultaneously (TE to TA2 interval). indicating no risk of red rot degradation. The powdery - A2 to the last event: the shrinkage is going to end, and friable appearance of the cover could be mainly but few fibres contract with a well distinct and not ascribable to the usage of the manuscript over time simultaneous event. The activity stops at the end of and to the acidic treatment to which the cover had this interval TA2-TL, where TL (T ) is the last been subjected to obtain a marbled aspect. temperature at which the last shrinkage is observed. A more valuable indicator of the stability and the The temperature range of the whole observed activity hydrothermal stability of collagen is the measure of is ΔTtotal = TL – TF, whereas the length ΔT= TE-TS the shrinkage temperature [14] that represents a of the C phase corresponds to the shrinkage interval. reliable measure of the degree of deterioration of The hydrothermal stability of the original leather was collagen fibres. For this measurement only very small analysed before and after the nanocollagen amount of material is needed. treatment. The triple helix of collagen consists of polypeptidic Three measures were performed on the original chains held together by hydrogen bonds and cross- leather before and after the treatment with the chosen links to form elongated fibrils, which bond together to nanocollagen solution. Results are reported in Table give rise to fibres with ordered structure. When 6; Fig. 4 shows the shrinkage activity of some fibres heated in water, the hydrogen bonds break and not treated and treated with nanocollagen. collagen deforms to randomly disordered chains in a specific temperature interval. The deformations Table 6 Shrinkage temperatures (°C) of the original leather of Mus. 243 cover, before and after the treatment with nanocollagen 0.7 mg/ml in isopropyl alcohol/water 70/30 (V/V). Average on 3 samples for each treatment. Final Shrinkage Sample Initial temperature of shrinkage intervals shrinkage temperature temperature total interval TF (A1) TB1 (B1) TS (C) TE (B2) TA2 (A2) TL ΔT total non- 33.1 ± 0.6 41.1 ± 1.3 47.6 ± 1.3 70.3 ± 1.1 80.6 ± 4.1 93.5 ± 3.6 60.4 ± 3.0 treated treated 37.2 ± 3.7 41.6 ± 5.2 59.6 ± 4.0 76.8 ± 0.0 77.8 ± 0.5 79.9 ± 0.8 42.7 ± 2.9 TF=Tfirst; TS=Tshrinkage; TE=Tend; TL=Tlast The leather treated with the nanocollagen solution interval ΔT (59.6 - 76.8°C) is shorter for the treated showed a significant increase in the shrinkage leather, indicating an increased uniformity in the temperature: 47.6°C before the treatment and 59.6°C fibres length and arrangement, but occurs at higher after nanocollagen application. The shrinkage Fig. 4. Shrinkage activity of the original Mus. 243 leather. Top: non-treated sample before shrinkage (left) and at the end of the shrinkage activity (right). Bottom: sample treated with nanocollagen solution 0.7 mg/ml in isopropyl alcohol/water 70/30 (V/V) before shrinkage (left) and at the end of the shrinkage activity (right). Magnification 50X. At the end of the shrinkage activity, the non-treated fibres are fragmented and collapsed, while the treated partially maintain their integrity. 5. Conclusions temperatures, highlighting the reconstitution of the The research presented in this paper allowed for the bulk of collagen fibres. synthesis of a new kind of nanostructured nanotubes It is to underline that undamaged standard collagen of collagen especially conceived for the preservation usually shrinks at TS around 65°C [20] not far from of leather artefacts, and able to ensure a real and the values reached by the original leather after the durable effectiveness of the treatment, without treatment with nanocollagen. altering the appearance and the equilibrium of the At the end of all the experimental work, the internal fats and moisture of the leather. nanocollagen solution in isopropyl alcohol/water The nanomaterial was developed to exhibit novel 70/30 (V/V) was applied by spraying to the flesh side characteristics, such as increased strength, flexibility of the Mus. 243 cover. and solubility in unusual solvents. Due to the high brittleness of the cover leather, to The mechanical tests demonstrated a very positive ensure a more effective consolidation, it was decided increase in tensile and tearing resistance, as well as to apply the solution also to the hair side, but, to avoid in bending resistance, high enough to contrast the an excessive increase in stiffness, the solution was weakness of the original artefact, without creating a applied at reduced concentration (0.35 mg/ml). rigid and breakable leather. Moreover nanocollagen, due its capability to link SEM imaging well evidenced the capability of the fibres together, was used to adhere small fragments nanocollagen solution to create bonds between the of the cover, which were partially lifted or detached collagen fibres and to fill the inter-fibres cavities. (Fig. 5). Moreover, after nanocollagen application, the fibres Fig. 5. Top: Area of the leather cover presenting partial detachment and lifting. Bottom: same area after the nanocollagen application. appeared less tangled than before and the leather preliminary study, Journal of the Institute of surface appeared smoother and rebuilt in its integrity. Conservation, 36 (2013) 125-144. The measurements of shrinkage temperature [4] Ilaria Camerini, La conservazione del fondo showed an improvement in the response of collagen Corsini. Volume 157 G 2. Nuove metodologie fibres to the degradation, with a partial reconstitution per il trattamento del Red Rot, (2013-14) Master of the lost elasticity and flexibility. This behaviour can Thesis at Università Tor Vergata (Roma, Italy), be explained as a rehydration and a partial restoration Unpublished. of the triple helixes bonds and the cross-links [5] J. Landoulsi, C.J. Roy, C. Dupont-Gillain, S.D. between the superhelices forming the quaternary Champagne, Synthesis of collagen nanotubes structure of the collagen molecule. with highly regular dimensions through The aforementioned effects made the new membrane-templated layer-by-layer assembly, synthesised nanocollagen particularly suitable for the Biomacromolecules, 10 (2009) 1021-1024. treatment of the volume Mus. 243, which complete [6] [L. Falcão, M.E. Machado Araújo, Tannins restoration is described in a Master Thesis for the characterisation in new and historic vegetable high training school (SAF) of the Istituto centrale tanned leathers fibres by spot tests, Journal of restauro e conservazione patrimonio archivistico e Cultural Heritage 12 (2011) 149-156. librario [21]. [7] K.H. Inoue, A.E. Hagerman, Determination of Further tests of the developed product were gallotannin with rhodanine, Analytical performed by applying it to a very deteriorated leather Biochemistry 169 (1988) 363-369. armchair, with excellent results. [8] L.J. Porter, L.N. Hrstich, B.G. Chan, The The mass production and marketing of the novel conversion of procyanidins and prodelphinidins product is under study. to cyanidin and delphinidin, Phytochemistry 25 (1985) 223-230. [9] ISO/CIE 11664-6:2014(E) Colorimetry – Part 6: CIEDE2000 Colour-Difference Formula. Appendix A. Supplementary data [10] Test Method T 414 om-12 - Internal tearing resistance of paper (Elmendorf-type method). [11] [ISO 4045:2008 (IULTCS/IUC 11) - Leather - References Chemical tests - Determination of pH. [1] C. Dignard, J. Mason, Caring for leather, skin [12] [ISO 3380:2015 (IULTCS/IUP 16) - Leather - and fur,https://www.canada.ca/en/conservation- Physical and mechanical tests - Determination of institute/services/care-objects/leather-feathers- shrinkage temperature up to 100 degrees C. bone/caring-leather-skin-fur.html#a21002. (Last [13] J. Font, J. Espejo, S. Cuadros, M. R. Reyes, A. access March 12th 2018) Bacardit, S. Butì, Comparison of IUP 16 and [2] G. Ruzicka, P. Zyats, S. Reidell, O. Primanis, Microscopic Hot Table Methods for Shrinkage Leather Conservation-booking leather Temperature Determination, Journal of the consolidants, in M. Kite, R. Thompson (eds), Society of Leather Technologists and Chemists Conservation of leather and related materials, 94 (2010) 59-64. Oxford, Elsevier Butterworth- Heinemann, [14] R. Larsen, M. Vest, K. Nielsen, Determination of (2006), 230-232. hydrothermal stability (shrinkage temperature) [3] A. Johnson, Evaluation of the use of SC6000 in of historical leathers by the micro hot table conjunction with Klucel G as a conservation technique. Society of Leather Technologists and treatment for bookbinding leather: notes on a Chemists Journal 77 (1995) 151-156. [15] B. de Campos Vidal, M.L. S. Mello, Collagen [20] [M. Kite, R. Thomson, Conservation of Leather type I amide I band infrared spectroscopy, and Related Materials, Elsevier Butterworth- Micron 42 (2011) 283-289. Heinemann, Oxford 2006. [16] W.H. Tiong, G. Damodaran, H. Naik, J.L. Kelly, [21] Camilla Del Re, Una nuova risorsa per il restauro A. Pandit, Enhancing Amine Terminals in an del cuoio: sperimentazione e applicazione del Amine-Deprived Collagen Matrix, Langmuir 24 nanocollagene nel restauro del volume Mus. 243 (2008) 11752-11761. della Biblioteca Casanatense di Roma, (2015- [17] E.L. Wallace, Method for measuring the pH of 2016) Master Thesis at Istituto centrale per il leather using a simple glass-electrode assembly, restauro e la conservazione del patrimonio Journal of Research of the National Bureau of archivistico e librario, Scuola di Alta Formazione. Standards, 15 (1935) 5-11. Unpublished. [18] Canadian Conservation Institute, Care of alum, vegetable, and mineral tanned leather CCI Notes, 8(2) (1992) 1-4. [19] V. Dirksen, (1997), The Degradation and Conservation of Leather, Journal of Conservation and Museum Studies 3 (1997) 6- 10. DOI: http://doi.org/10.5334/jcms.3972. Supplementary data Confocal Scanning Laser Microscopy (CLSM). Leather samples were analysed with confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM), FV1000 (Olympus Corp., Tokyo, Japan), using laser channels at l excitation 488 nm and emission range 459-494 nm; and at l excitation 635 nm and emission range 606-686 nm. CLSM data are a set of two-dimensional (2D) cross-sectional images in the x-y plane obtained with IMARIS 6.2 software (Bitplane AG, Zurich, Switzerland). A set of three-dimensional (3D) values and cross-sectional images in the xz-yz plane, obtained with IMARIS 6.2 software, were also recorded. Fig. SI1 displays two images of the flesh side of leather non-treated and after application of nanocollagen at concentration 0.7 mg/ml in isopropyl alcohol/water 70/30 (V/V). By comparison between the two images the filling and reconstructing effect of nanocollagen is quite evident; furthermore, after application of the product, the leather surface appears smoother than before. Fig SI1: CLSM images. Left: non-treated leather. Right: the same leather after application of nanocollagen. Magnification 20X. Laser excitation: 635 nm. Attribution of the characteristics bands of nanocollagen by FTIR. Table S1. Infrared spectral absorption bands for the nanocollagen final products. Sample Wavenumber Functional group Reference -1 (cm ) Nanocollagen 3316 N-H stretching Spectrometric Identification of organic 1635 C(=O) Amide I stretching compounds, Seventh Edition, Robert M. Silverstein, 1548 N-H Amide II bending Francis X. Webster 1454 C-N stretching David J. Kiemle 1237 Interaction between N-H bending and C-N stretching

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Condensed MatterarXiv (Cornell University)

Published: Dec 21, 2017

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