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The influence of surface roughness on the rheology of immersed and dry frictional spheres

The influence of surface roughness on the rheology of immersed and dry frictional spheres Pressure-imposed rheometry is used to examine the in uence of surface roughness on the rhe- ology of immersed and dry frictional spheres in the dense regime. The quasi-static value of the e ective friction coecient is not signi cantly a ected by particle roughness while the critical vol- ume fraction at jamming decreases with increasing roughness. These values are found to be similar in immersed and dry conditions. Rescaling the volume fraction by the maximum volume fraction leads to collapses of rheological data on master curves. The asymptotic behaviors are examined close to the jamming transition. arXiv:1904.12633v1 [cond-mat.soft] 25 Apr 2019 I. INTRODUCTION While being quite di erent particulate systems, viscous non-colloidal suspensions and dry granular materials can be described by rheological laws which use a common framework [1]. When a dense collection of dry hard spheres (having diameter d and density  ) is sheared at a given shear rate, _ , under an imposed particle pressure, P , the rheology is determined by the knowledge of two dimensionless quantities: the packing faction, , and the e ective friction coecient (or stress ratio),  = =P , where  is the shear stress. Dimensional analysis implies that these two quantities only depend on a single inertial dimensionless number, I = d _  =P , and are thus written as (I ) and (I ), see e.g. [2]. A similar approach can be applied to the viscous ow of suspensions of hard non-Brownian spheres. The rheological laws adopt a similar form, (J ) and (J ), but with the inertial number, I , replaced by a viscous number, J =  _=P , where  is the suspending uid viscosity [1]. f f This frictional formulation is equivalent to the more classical description of the rheology of suspensions in terms of e ective viscosities: the shear,  () = = _ = =J (), and s f normal,  () = P= _ = 1=J (), relative viscosities where J () is the inverse function of n f (J ) which is perfectly de ned since (J ) is monotonic. These rheological properties become singular in the dense regime when reaching the jam- ming transition for which the particulate system ceases to ow, both in the viscous (suspen- sions) and inertial (dry granular materials) cases. There is not yet a complete understanding of these singular behaviors and the current description remains rather empirical. The major problem lies in relating the mechanics at the grain scale to these macroscopic properties. As the jamming transition is approached, particles form an extended network of contacts, see e.g. [3{5], and the rheology is then dominated by contact forces, even in the case of viscous suspensions for which the hydrodynamics interactions between the particles become of lesser importance and are overshadowed by direct contact interactions, see e.g. [6]. Nu- merical simulations and scaling arguments [7, 8] have recently pointed out the role of friction between the grains, and in particular the e ect of varying the interparticle sliding friction coecient,  . For low  , the dissipation mainly occurs in the interstitial uid between sf sf the grains for viscous ow of hard spheres while it is due to inelastic particle collisions for inertial ow. Similar physical mechanisms occur at large  in a rolling regime wherein the sf spheres roll relative to each other. The dissipation due to the sliding contacts is dominant in 2 the intermediate range of  which has been expected to be most relevant experimentally sf in particular close to the jamming transition. Only a few experiments have examined the impact of interparticle friction, and in par- ticular surface roughness, on the rheological properties of these particulate systems. The earliest study of Lootens et al. [9] showed that increasing surface roughness of colloidal particles shifts the shear-thickening transition to lower critical stresses. For non-colloidal viscous suspensions, the available experimental results show that increasing roughness leads to higher viscosities [10, 11] in qualitative agreement with numerical simulations [12, 13] using rather large value of  ( 0:5 1) to match the observations. The in uence of sf the interparticle friction has been mostly studied in numerical simulations for dry granular media [7, 14, 15]. No systematic experimental study has been undertaken in the very dense regime close to the jamming transition. The present work aims at lling this gap by using pressure-imposed rheometry which is particularly suitable to infer the singular rheological properties of particulate systems at the jamming transition [1, 16{19]. These rheological measurements are reported in section III, both for dry and immersed hard spheres, after presenting the materials and techniques in section II; conclusions are drawn in section IV. II. EXPERIMENTS A. Rheometry The experimental apparatus, depicted in Fig. 1(a), is a custom-made rheometer enabling pressure- and volume-imposed rheological measurements of dry or immersed granular materi- als. The granular sample is subjected to a simple shear in a plane-plane geometry consisting of a cylindrical annulus (of internal and external radii R = 43:95 mm and R = 90:28 mm, 1 2 respectively) that is attached to a bottom plate and is covered by a top plate. In order to obtain a linear shearing of the granular sample, the cylindrical annulus rotates at a constant angular velocity controlled by an asynchronous motor (Parvalux SD18) regulated by a fre- quency controller (OMRON MX2 0.4 kW) while the top plate does not rotate. A wide range of shear rate, _ , can be achieved, spanning between 0:02 and 130 s . The important feature of this rheometer is that the top plate is permeable to the uid but not to the particles, see a blowup of a picture of this plate in Fig. 1(c). It is manufactured with holes of size 2 5 mm 3 (a) Translation Stage (b) Precision scale ON/OFF Position sensor Torque sensor Solvent trap Spring (c) Top Plate Bottom Plate FIG. 1. (a) Sketch of the experimental apparatus. (b) Microscopic image of slightly and highly roughened polystyrene spheres. (c) Image of the top permeable plate showing the corrugated strips. enabling uid to ow through it but is also covered by a 0:24 mm nylon mesh designed to stop particles. This top plate can be moved vertically by using a linear positioning stage (Physics Instrumente M-521) and ts into the cylindrical annulus with a precision of 280 m. Both the top and bottom plates are also roughened by positioning corrugated strips of height and width 0.5 mm onto their surfaces, as seen in Fig. 1(c). This apparatus was initially built to study suspension rheology [17, 19] and has been adapted to make possible the investigation of dry granular material. An important ingredient was to create appropriate roughnesses on the top and bottom plates to enable bulk granular motion. Another important point was to operate the rheometer in an air-conditioned room (at 25 Celcius) with a high level of humidity (at a relative humidity of 80%) to avoid electrostatic e ects between the dry polystyrene particles. The shear stress,  , is deduced from the torque exerted on the top plate measured by a torque transducer (TEI - CFF401) connected to the top plate. The component of the normal stress perpendicular to the top plate, simply referred as the particle pressure P , is given by a precision scale (Mettler-Toledo XS6002S) attached to the translation stage. The bulk packing fraction of the sample, , can be adjusted by displacing the top plate. The plate position, h, is continuously measured by a position sensor (Novotechnik T-50). A feedback control system connects the positioning stage and the precision scale in order 4 to perform pressure-imposed experiments on the sample. In this pressure-imposed mode, the resulting shear stress,  , and packing fraction, , are measured as functions of shear rate, _ , for a set particle pressure, P , once steady state is established. Classical volume- imposed rheometry can also be performed by xing the top plate position, i.e. xing the volume fraction . In this volume-imposed mode, the shear stress,  , and particle pressure, P , are measured as functions of shear rate, _ , for a given volume fraction . Note that a soft spring is positioned between the top plate and the torque sensor to avoid blockage during highly dense experiments. A series of calibration experiments with a pure uid is also performed to infer the undesired friction from the central axis as well as the viscous contribution from the gap between top plate and cell walls. These e ects are subtracted to the torque measurements. Buoyancy e ects are also accounted for in the measurements of the normal force that the particles exert on the porous plate in the gradient direction. In immersed experiments performed in pressure- or volume-imposed modes, polystyrene particles, shown in Fig. 1(b), are suspended in a Newtonian uid (polyethylene glycol-ran- propylene glycol monobutylether) which has a matching density with the particles ( = 1056 kg/m at 25 Celcius) and a large viscosity ( = 2:01 Pa s at 25 Celcius). Air bubbles are removed by vacuum extraction and then by a long period of pre-shearing. In experiments with dry particles undertaken in the pressure-imposed mode, the cell is lled up to a given height by a rain-like procedure which provides a good homogeneous distribution of the particles within the cell. A small dispersion in size is required to avoid ordering. Ranges of imposed pressure (P = 60 380 Pa) and sample height (h < 16 mm) are chosen to avoid shear banding nucleation. It is important to stress that the smallest con ning pressure has to be larger than the hydrostatic pressure to avoid large inhomogeneity in the bulk. This results in a more limited range of  in the dry case. B. Manufacturing rough spheres Two set of spheres having di erent surface roughnesses but approximatively the same size are used in the experiments, see Figs. 1(b) and 2(b). The particles labeled \Slighly Roughened" (SR) correspond to rigid polystyrene particles (Dynoseeds TS 500) manufac- tured by Microbeads SA, having a density  = 1050 kg/m and an approximately Gaussian distribution in size with a mean diameter of d = 580 m. As can be seen in the right panel of 5 Rotating Axis (a) Eccentric Axis (b) Rolling bearing Toothed Constant Foam imposed load Rough Surfaces -100 X Range : 4.91 mm FIG. 2. (a) Top: Sketch of the particle roughening apparatus. Bottom: Confocal image of the upper rough surface. (b) Microscopic images of typical slightly (right) and highly (left) roughened spheres. Bottom: Corresponding confocal images of the particles surface. Fig. 2(b), these spheres are not perfectly smooth but possess some small surface roughnesses. The particles labeled \Highly Roughened" (HR) are produced by further roughening these polystyrene spheres, see the left panel of Fig. 2(b). The roughening procedure consists in forcing a continuous motion of the particles between two parallel rough plates resulting in a mechanical erosion of the particle surfaces. The particle-roughening apparatus is sketched in Fig. 2(a). Sandpapers (Walfcraft 80) cover both the top and bottom circular plates (20 cm in diameter) to avoid slippage. The bottom circular plate is xed while the displacement of its top counterpart is driven by an electrical stirring device having a shifted rotational-axis ( = 5 mm) with respect to the bottom-plate axis. Two rolling bearings transfer rotation into translation resulting in a circular movement. Circular translation instead of rotation ensures that the particle trajectory is independent of its location. Each particle thus experiences the same mechanical erosion. In addition, the top plate exerts a static load (1200 g) in order to amplify the impact on the particle surface. A toothed soft foam is also used to transfer the motion of the stirring device to the top plate while avoiding particle fracturing. A typical protocol consists in spreading 1 g of polystyrene spheres onto the bottom plate. Fixing the stirring frequency at 1:2 Hz results in a relative velocity between the plate of Y Range : 1.17 mm Z Range : 0.45 mm d i d R (m) R (m) R (m)    d (m) a q z sf sf rf SR 0:287 0:008 0:387 0:008 2:073 0:008 0:23 0:03 0:25 0:03 0:004 0:001 580 20 HR 1:896 0:008 2:410 0:008 9:808 0:008 0:37 0:03 0:35 0:03 0:007 0:001 540 20 TABLE I. Properties of the \Slightly Roughened" (SR) and \Highly Roughened" (HR) spheres: d i Roughness coecients (R ; R ; R ), sliding friction coecients ( and  in the dry and im- a q z sf sf mersed cases, respectively), rolling friction coecients ( in the dry case), and diameters (d). rf 37 mm/s. Fig. 2(b) shows the e ect of one hour of erosion for a representative individual sphere. A slightly reduction in particle size is observed resulting in a slightly smaller mean diameter for the HR spheres, d = 540 m. C. Characterizing rough spheres To provide some indications regarding the particle geometry, typical surface-roughness characteristics have been measured, see Fig. 2(b). Confocal scanning microscopy of speci- mens of SR and HR spheres has been performed on a surface region of 170170 m . Average roughness, R , standard deviation, R , and ten-point mean roughness, R = (j Z j + j Z j) a q z + (where Z and Z are the average of the 5 tallest peaks and the 5 lowest valleys, respec- tively), are computed after tting and then subtracting the spherical shape. Surface prop- erties of both batches of spherical particles are summarized in Table I. To characterize the interparticle sliding friction coecients, we perform controlled sliding- experiments using two parallels plates coated with a monolayer of polystyrene particles identical to those used in the rheological experiments. The beads are glued on both the top and bottom plates in a circular annulus geometry, as shown in Fig. 3(a),(c). Distributing spatially the glued particles in a random manner ensures to avoid any geometrical match between the facing surfaces during sliding. Frictional characteristics are explored by chang- ing the sliding velocity (8 6 v 6 160 mm/s) and the static load (40 6 P 6 180 Pa) imposed onto the sample by adding weights on the top plate. The resulting shear stress,  , is obtained by measuring the torque using a rheometer measuring head (Anton Paar DSR 502). This head is coupled to an horizontal rail which transfers the angular velocity to the top plate, see Fig. 3(a)-(b). The bottom plate is xed while top plate rotates. Controlled 7 (a) (b) (c) (d) 0 50 100 150 200 FIG. 3. Interparticle sliding friction experiment. (a) Lateral view of the setup (b) Top view showing the static-weight distribution on the top plate. (c) Bottom plate: the sample is a ring of e ective radius r = (r + r )=2 = 18:5 mm (r = 25 mm and r = 12 mm). (d) Plot of the shear 2 1 1 2 stress  versus the normal pressure P and corresponding linear ts for SR ( ) and HR () spheres in the dry (magenta and red, respectively) and immersed (cyan and blue, respectively) cases. experiments with a misaligned axis have been performed in order to verify that the contact area does not have any in uence on the torque measurements. We also check that there is no shear-rate dependence in  . The measured shear stress,  , is plotted as a function of the applied normal stress, P , in Fig. 3(d) for two batches of SR and HR spheres. Clearly, a linear dependence is observed. A linear t yields the slope, i.e. the sliding friction coecient, for each sample. The interparticle sliding friction coecients for SR and HR spheres are given d i in Table I in both dry and immersed situations,  and  respectively. The sliding friction sf sf coecient increases with increasing roughness but does not change signi cantly between dry or immersed conditions. In order to estimate the interparticle rolling friction coecients, we also conducted con- 8 (a) (b) 0.10 Rheometer SR Particles HR Particles Eccentric Axis 0.05 Rolling bearing Metallic Bead P P Toothed 0.00 Foam 0.0 2.5 5.0 7.5 10.0 F (N) Smooth Surfaces FIG. 4. Interparticle rolling friction experiment. (a) Lateral view of the setup (b) Plot of the rolling force, F , versus the applied normal force, F , and corresponding linear ts for SR ( ) R N and HR () spheres in a dry situation. trolled rolling-experiments using a device with a design similar to the particle-roughening apparatus of Fig. 2(a). The bottom plate is xed while the top plate performs a translational motion with a shifted rotational-axis ( = 5 mm) with respect to the bottom-plate axis, see Fig. 4(a). The particles which are sandwiched between these two plates experience the same rolling motion. The surfaces of the plates have been chosen to be rather smooth to avoid any impact on the measurements. The rolling force, F , exerted on the particles is obtained by measuring the torque using a rheometer measuring head (Anton Paar DSR 502). This force is plotted as a function of the applied normal force, F , in Fig. 4(b) for the SR and HR spheres. The interparticle rolling friction coecient,  , increases with roughness but rf is found to be always much smaller than the sliding friction coecient, see Table I. III. EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS We display rst the rheological measurements in Fig. 5(a) and (b) by plotting the e ective friction coecient,  = =P , and the bulk volume fraction, , as a function of the viscous number, J =  _=P , for the immersed particles and as function of the inertial number, I = d _  =P , for the dry particles. A remarkable result is that  is not signi cantly F (N) R (a) (b)0.60 2.5 Immersed SR Immersed HR 0.55 2.0 Dry SR Dry RH 1.5 φ 0.50 1.0 0.45 0.5 0.40 − 4 − 3 − 2 − 1 − 4 − 3 − 2 − 1 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 J, I J, I (c) 2.0 (d) 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.0 0.5 1.0 0.0 1.0 0.0 0.1 0.2 0.5 1 − φ/φ 0.5 0.0 − 4 − 3 − 2 − 1 0.40 0.45 0.50 0.55 0.60 10 10 10 10 φ 1 − φ/φ FIG. 5. (a) E ective friction coecient,  = =P , and (b) volume fraction, , versus the viscous number, J =  _=P , for the immersed case (blue and cyan colors) and versus the inertial number, I = d _ P= , for the dry case (red and magenta colors), for SR ( ) and HR () spheres. The dashed lines are the linear regressions in J (immersed case) and in I (dry case), see Table II. (c) E ective friction coecient,  = =P , versus volume fraction, . (d) Rescaled friction coe- cient,   , versus rescaled volume fraction, 1 = . The inset shows the same data in linear c c scales. The black dashed lines are the linear regressions in 1 = for the dry and the immersed cases. a ected by an increase in particle roughness (or in interparticle friction). Conversely, there is a conspicuous shift of (J ) for the immersed case and (I ) for the dry case toward lower values of  with increasing surface roughness (or interparticle friction). The semi-logarithmic plots of Fig. 5(a) and (b) are particularly amenable to a close ex- = /P = /P c models label c c 1=2 / J SR 0:37 0:01 0:584 0:002 Viscous (immersed) 1=2 / J HR 0:36 0:01 0:565 0:002 / I SR 0:36 0:01 0:587 0:002 Inertial (dry) / I HR 0:36 0:01 0:563 0:002 TABLE II. Values of  and  for the SR and HR spheres in the immersed and dry cases. c c amination of the jamming transition, and in particular show that both  and  tend to nite measurable values,  and  respectively, at the jamming point. The critical (or maximum c c owable) volume fraction,  , and friction coecient,  , can be measured by tting the c c data using a linear regression in J [1] or in I [2] in the immersed or dry cases, respectively, as summarized in Table II and shown by the dashed lines of Fig. 5(a) and (b). The critical volume fraction,  , happens to be similar within error bars in the immersed and dry cases and shows a decrease with increasing roughness (or interparticle friction). The value of measured for the SR spheres is found to be similar to those obtained (  0:585) in previous immersed experiments by [1, 17] but di ers with that obtained (  0:625) in the dry case by [18]. The values of  for the immersed and dry cases are similar within error bars and do not signi cantly di er for the SR and HR spheres. They are slightly larger than those found previously (  0:30 0:32) in the immersed case by [1, 17] and much larger than that obtained (  0:26 0:27) in the dry case by [18]. The present value of 0.36 corresponds to a friction angle of 20 degree which is close to the typical pile angles observed for spherical particles. Fig. 5(c) shows that  presents a quasi-linear decrease in  but with di erent slopes for the dry and immersed cases. By rescaling  by   and  by 1 = , good collapses of c c the data for the two di erent roughnesses are obtained in Fig. 5(d) for the dry and immersed cases, respectively. A linear regression, ()  / (1 = ), yields a decent t of all the c c i v data with coecients of proportionality a  3:52 in the (dry) inertial case and a  8:05 in the (immersed) viscous case, see the inset of Fig. 5(d) and the inset of Fig. 7(c). We now turn to a detailed examination of the rheological data obtained in the viscous (immersed) case in Fig. 6. Rescaling  by  provides a complete collapse of all the data for both the SR and HR spheres. In addition to the frictional description displayed in 11 (a) (b) 3 3 10 -2 10 -2 3 3 10 10 2 2 10 10 1 1 10 10 τ − 2 − 1 − 2 − 1 10 10 10 10 2 2 10 10 (φ − φ )/φ (φ − φ )/φ c c c c 1 1 10 10 0.7 0.8 0.9 1.0 0.7 0.8 0.9 1.0 φ/φ φ/φ c c (c) 2.0 (d) 1.0 1.0 0.9 1.5 0.9 0.8 − 4 − 3 − 2 − 1 1.0 10 10 10 10 0.8 0.5 − 4 − 3 − 2 − 1 10 10 10 10 0.7 0.00 0.05 0.10 0.15 0.00 0.05 0.10 0.15 J J FIG. 6. Rheological data in the immersed case: (a)  = = _ and (b)  = P= _ versus = as s n c well as (c)  = =P =  = and (d)  versus J . The insets of graphs (a,b) and (c,d) are log-log s n and semi-log plots, respectively. The dashed lines correspond to the best ts using the models summarized in Table II and the linear variation () =  + a (1 = ) as a leading expansion. c c Fig. 6(c) and (d), we provide the classical viscosity description in Fig. 6(a) and (b). The shear,  = = _ , and normal,  = P= _ , relative viscosities increase with increasing s n and diverge asymptotically at the maximum owable volume fraction,  . The log-log plot shown in the inset of Fig. 6(b) reveals that  diverges as (1 = ) near jamming. Note n c that since by construction J = 1= , the relation  / (1 = ) con rms the relation n n c 1=2 ( ) / J evidenced in Fig. 5(b) for the immersed case. The shear viscosity,  , is c s determined by the rheological law  () = () (), where () is given by the leading s n v 2 expansion () =  + a (1 = ) introduced in Fig. 5(d). The divergence in (1 = ) c c c = /η ˙ s f = P/η ˙ φ/φ n f c 6 (a) 10 (b) 6 6 10 10 4 -2 4 -2 10 10 2 2 10 10 − 3 − 2 − 1 − 3 − 2 − 1 τ 10 10 10 10 10 10 (φ − φ )/φ (φ − φ )/φ c c c c 0.96 0.97 0.98 0.99 1.00 0.96 0.97 0.98 0.99 1.00 φ/φ φ/φ c c (c)0.55 (d) 1.00 0.1 0.50 1.00 0.98 0.0 0.45 0.98 0.00 0.02 0.04 (φ − φ )/φ c c 0.96 0.40 0.96 0.0 0.1 0.35 − 3 − 2 − 1 − 3 − 2 − 1 10 10 10 10 10 10 I I 2 2 2 2 FIG. 7. Rheological data in the dry case: (a)  = = d _ and (b)  = P= d _ versus I p II p = as well as (c)  = =P =  = and (d)  versus I . The insets of graphs (a,b) and (d) are c s n log-log and linear plots, respectively. The dashed lines correspond to the best ts using the models summarized in Table II and the linear variation () =  + a (1 = ) as a leading expansion. c c The inset of graph (c) shows the rescaled friction coecient,   , versus the rescaled volume fraction, 1 = , together with this leading expansion. dominates close to jamming. An analogous data representation for the inertial (dry) case is displayed in Fig. 7 and shows a decent collapse of the data when rescaling  by  . While the collapse is excellent in the quasi-static regime, discrepancies arise as I & 10 . The shear and normal stresses 2 2 are normalized by the Bagnold scaling,  d _ [20]. This scaling de nes two dimensionless 2 2 2 2 functions of the volume fraction,  = = d _ and  = P= d _ , which diverge when I p II p 2 2 = /ρ d ˙ I p φ/φ 2 2 = P/ρ d ˙ II p approaching the maximum volume fraction,  . The function  is seen to diverge as c II (1 = ) near jamming as evidenced in the inset of Fig. 7(b). This is consistent with the relation ( ) / I observed in Fig. 5(b) for the dry case since  = 1=I , see also the c II inset of Fig. 7(d). The other dimensionless function is given by  () = () () and has I II again a leading divergence in (1 = ) near jamming. A detailed display of (I ), (I ), and () is also provided in Fig. 7(c) and (d). The rheological data of Figs. 5, 6, 7 are given as Supplemental Material. IV. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS In this work, we have examined how particle roughness a ects the rheological properties of particulate systems in both immersed and dry conditions. We have used two batches of spherical particles, a batch of \slightly roughened" regular spheres (SR) and another batch of \highly roughened" spheres (HR) produced by further roughening these regular spheres. We have provided a detailed characterization of these particles, and more precisely determined their surface-roughness characteristics and their interparticle sliding and rolling friction co- ecients using custom-made experimental devices. We have then performed pressure- and volume-imposed measurements of the rheology of theses two batches of spheres in the dense regime. An important nding of the present study is the examination of the rheological behavior in the vicinity of the jamming transition in the dry and immersed cases. In the limit of vanishing shear rate, the critical values for the e ective friction coecient,  , and for the volume fraction,  , are found to be similar for suspensions and dry granular media. This seems to imply that hydrodynamic interactions are inconsequential and contact forces are prevailing in this quasi-static limit. A striking result is that  is not signi cantly a ected by particle roughness while  decreases with increasing roughness. This later nding shows that the granular system needs to dilate more in order to ow when roughness is increased. Rescaling the volume fraction, , by this maximum volume fraction,  , leads to an excellent collapse of all the data on master curves for the e ective friction coecient (or stress ratio), , as well as for the shear and normal stresses,  and P respectively, normalized by a viscous 2 2 scaling ( _ ) in the immersed case and by an inertial scaling ( d _ ) in the dry case. The excellent collapse of the experimental data by using the reduced volume fraction, 14 relations exponent present predictions simulations simulations work (frictionless) (frictionless) (frictional) / J 0:5 0:35[22] 0.32[22] 0:5[23, 24] Viscous (immersed)   / J 2 2:83[22] 2.77[22] 2[23, 24] / ( ) 1.5-1.6[13, 25] 2.3[13],1.9[25] s;n c / I 1 0:35[22] 0.38[26] 1[27] Inertial (dry)   / I 1 0:35[22] 0.39[26] 1[27] / ( ) I;II c TABLE III. Critical exponents found in the present work versus predicted and numerical values. = , has been previously observed for the shear viscosity in the suspension case [6], but without a controlled study of the in uence of roughness and friction. Similar behavior has been also observed in numerical simulations when interparticle friction is increased [12, 13]. However these simulations match the present experimental  for interparticle sliding friction coecients (  0:5 1) quite larger than those experimentally measured ( = 0:23 for sf sf the SR spheres and = 0:37 for the HR spheres). It is likely that rolling friction (with experimental coecients  = 0:0043 for the SR spheres and = 0:0070 for the HR spheres) sf is somehow captured by using larger sliding friction coecients as studied in granular media by [21]. The present work not only yields the quasi-static values but also the asymptotic behaviors of  and  in the vicinity of the jamming transition. The departures of the e ective friction coecient and of the volume fraction from their static limits,   and  , are found c c to vary as the square root of the viscous number in the immersed case, i.e. / J , and linearly with the inertial number in the dry case, i.e. / I . The present experimental data for the suspensions of the two batches of SR and HR spheres also reveal that both relative shear and normal viscosities,  and  , present a similar algebraic divergence in s n ( ) as previously observed for a variety of diverse suspensions of frictional spheres [1, 6]. Interestingly, the analogous dimensionless functions obtained by normalizing the shear and normal stresses with an inertial scaling in the dry case,  and  , present the same I II dominant algebraic divergence. The critical exponents found in the present experiments are compared in Table III to the 15 theoretical predictions [22] which have been obtained for frictionless spheres and to results of various numerical simulations performed in two dimensions [22, 23] as well as in three dimensions [13, 24{27] for dry and immersed spheres with and without frictional interactions. They are in good agreement with the frictional simulations, in particular those performed in three dimensions. It is nonetheless dicult to assess what is the prevailing dissipation regime. The J  diagram proposed by [8] suggests that the immersed experiments lies sf between the rolling and frictional-sliding regimes while the I  diagram proposed by [7] sf seems to indicate that the dry experiments belong to the frictional-sliding regime. However, the rolling friction is not accounted for in these studies. Finally, the present work may shed some light on the transition between the viscous and inertial regimes which is far from being fully understood and still a subject of debate [22{ 24]. Assuming that this transition arises when the viscous and inertial stresses are matched, the crossover shear-rate is then _ = ( = d )  ()= (). The similar divergence of v!i f p s I the functions  () and  () found here seems to suggest that _ is independent of the s I v!i volume fraction close to the jamming transition. Further investigations are clearly necessary to understand thoroughly this viscous-inertial transition for dense frictional particles. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS This work has been carried out thanks to the support of the ANR project `Dense Particulate Systems' (ANR-13-IS09-0005-01), the `Laboratoire d'Excellence M ecanique et Complexit e' (ANR-11-LABX-0092), the Excellence Initiative of Aix-Marseille Univer- sity - A MIDEX (ANR-11-IDEX-0001-02) funded by the French Government `Investisse- ments d'Avenir programme'. FT bene ted from a fellowship of CONICYT (Engagement: 74170026). [1] F. Boyer, E. Guazzelli, and O. Pouliquen, \Unifying suspension and granular rheology," Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 188301 (2011). [2] Y. Forterre and O. Pouliquen, \Flows of dense granular media," Annu. Rev. Fluid Mech. 40, 1{24 (2008). 16 [3] M. E. Cates, J. P. Wittmer, J.-P. Bouchaud, and P. Claudin, \Jamming, Force Chains, and Fragile Matter," Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 1841{1844 (1998). [4] E. Lerner, G. During,  and M. Wyart, \A uni ed framework for non-Brownian suspension ows and soft amorphous solids," Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 109, 4798{4803 (2012). [5] B. Andreotti, J.-L. Barrat, and C. Heussinger, \Shear Flow of Non-Brownian Suspensions Close to Jamming," Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 105901 (2012). [6] E. Guazzelli and O. Pouliquen, \Rheology of dense granular suspensions," J. Fluid Mech. 852, P1 (2018). [7] E. DeGiuli, J. N. McElwaine, and M. Wyart, \Phase diagram for inertial granular ows," Phys. Rev. E 94, 012904 (2016). [8] M. Trulsson, E. DeGiuli, and M. Wyart, \E ect of friction on dense suspension ows of hard particles," Phys. Rev. E 95, 012605 (2017). [9] D. Lootens, H. Van Damme, Y. H emar, and P. H ebraud, \Dilatant ow of concentrated suspensions of rough particles," Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 268302 (2005). [10] J. Y. Moon, S. Dai, L. Chang, J. S. Lee, and R. I. Tanner, J. Non-Newtonian Fluid Mech. 223, 233{239 (2015). [11] R. I. Tanner and S. Dai, \Particle roughness and rheology in noncolloidal suspensions," J. Rheol. 60, 809{818 (2016). [12] S. Gallier, E. Lemaire, F. Peters, and L. Lobry, \Rheology of sheared suspensions of rough frictional particles," J. Fluid Mech. 757, 514{549 (2014). [13] R. Mari, R. Seto, J. F. Morris, and M. M. Denn, \Shear thickening, frictionless and frictional rheologies in non-Brownian suspensions," J. Rheol. 58, 1693{1724 (2014). [14] J. Sun and S. Sundaresan, \A constitutive model with microstructure evolution for ow of rate-independent granular materials," J. Fluid Mech. 682, 590{616 (2011). [15] S. Chialvo, J. Sun, and S. Sundaresan, \Bridging the rheology of granular ows in three regimes," Phys. Rev. E 85, 021305 (2012). [16] O. Kuwano, R. Ando, and T. Hatano, \Crossover from negative to positive shear rate depen- dence in granular friction," Geophys. Res. Lett. 40, 1295{1299 (2013). [17] S. Dagois-Bohy, S. Hormozi, E. Guazzelli, and O. Pouliquen, \Rheology of dense suspensions of non-colloidal spheres in yield-stress uids," J. Fluid Mech. 776, R2 (2015). [18] A. Fall, G. Ovarlez, D. Hautemayou, C. Mezi ere, J.-N. Roux, and F. Chevoir, \Dry granular 17 ows: Rheological measurements of the (I)-rheology," J. Rheol. 59, 1065{1080 (2015). [19] F. Tapia, S. Shaikh, J. E. Butler, O. Pouliquen, and E. Guazzelli, \Rheology of concentrated suspensions of non-colloidal rigid bres," J. Fluid Mech. 827, R5 (2017). [20] R. A. Bagnold, \Experiments on a gravity-free dispersion of large solid spheres in a Newtonian uid under shear," Proc. R. Soc. London Ser. A 225, 49{63 (1954). [21] N. Estrada, A. Taboada, and F. Radja , \Shear strength and force transmission in granular media with rolling resistance," Phys. Rev. E 78, 43{11 (2008). [22] E. DeGiuli, G. During,  E. Lerner, and M. Wyart, \Uni ed theory of inertial granular ows and non-Brownian suspensions," Phys. Rev. E 91, 062206 (2015). [23] M. Trulsson, B. Andreotti, and P. Claudin, \Transition from the viscous to inertial regime in dense suspensions," Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 118305 (2012). [24] L. Amarsid, J.-Y. Delenne, P. Mutabaruka, Y. Monerie, F. Perales, and F. Radjai, \Viscoin- ertial regime of immersed granular ows," Phys. Rev. E 96, 012901 (2017). [25] S. Gallier, F. Peters, and L. Lobry, \Simulations of sheared dense noncolloidal suspensions: Evaluation of the role of long-range hydrodynamics," Phys. Rev. Fluids 3, 042301(R) (2018). [26] P.-E. Peyneau and J.-N. Roux, \Frictionless bead packs have macroscopic friction, but no dilatancy," Phys. Rev. E 78, 011307 (2008). [27] E. Az ema and F. Radja , \Internal Structure of Inertial Granular Flows," Phys. Rev. Lett 112, 078001 (2014). http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Condensed Matter arXiv (Cornell University)

The influence of surface roughness on the rheology of immersed and dry frictional spheres

Condensed Matter , Volume 2019 (1904) – Apr 25, 2019

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2469-990X
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ARCH-3331
DOI
10.1103/PhysRevFluids.4.104302
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Abstract

Pressure-imposed rheometry is used to examine the in uence of surface roughness on the rhe- ology of immersed and dry frictional spheres in the dense regime. The quasi-static value of the e ective friction coecient is not signi cantly a ected by particle roughness while the critical vol- ume fraction at jamming decreases with increasing roughness. These values are found to be similar in immersed and dry conditions. Rescaling the volume fraction by the maximum volume fraction leads to collapses of rheological data on master curves. The asymptotic behaviors are examined close to the jamming transition. arXiv:1904.12633v1 [cond-mat.soft] 25 Apr 2019 I. INTRODUCTION While being quite di erent particulate systems, viscous non-colloidal suspensions and dry granular materials can be described by rheological laws which use a common framework [1]. When a dense collection of dry hard spheres (having diameter d and density  ) is sheared at a given shear rate, _ , under an imposed particle pressure, P , the rheology is determined by the knowledge of two dimensionless quantities: the packing faction, , and the e ective friction coecient (or stress ratio),  = =P , where  is the shear stress. Dimensional analysis implies that these two quantities only depend on a single inertial dimensionless number, I = d _  =P , and are thus written as (I ) and (I ), see e.g. [2]. A similar approach can be applied to the viscous ow of suspensions of hard non-Brownian spheres. The rheological laws adopt a similar form, (J ) and (J ), but with the inertial number, I , replaced by a viscous number, J =  _=P , where  is the suspending uid viscosity [1]. f f This frictional formulation is equivalent to the more classical description of the rheology of suspensions in terms of e ective viscosities: the shear,  () = = _ = =J (), and s f normal,  () = P= _ = 1=J (), relative viscosities where J () is the inverse function of n f (J ) which is perfectly de ned since (J ) is monotonic. These rheological properties become singular in the dense regime when reaching the jam- ming transition for which the particulate system ceases to ow, both in the viscous (suspen- sions) and inertial (dry granular materials) cases. There is not yet a complete understanding of these singular behaviors and the current description remains rather empirical. The major problem lies in relating the mechanics at the grain scale to these macroscopic properties. As the jamming transition is approached, particles form an extended network of contacts, see e.g. [3{5], and the rheology is then dominated by contact forces, even in the case of viscous suspensions for which the hydrodynamics interactions between the particles become of lesser importance and are overshadowed by direct contact interactions, see e.g. [6]. Nu- merical simulations and scaling arguments [7, 8] have recently pointed out the role of friction between the grains, and in particular the e ect of varying the interparticle sliding friction coecient,  . For low  , the dissipation mainly occurs in the interstitial uid between sf sf the grains for viscous ow of hard spheres while it is due to inelastic particle collisions for inertial ow. Similar physical mechanisms occur at large  in a rolling regime wherein the sf spheres roll relative to each other. The dissipation due to the sliding contacts is dominant in 2 the intermediate range of  which has been expected to be most relevant experimentally sf in particular close to the jamming transition. Only a few experiments have examined the impact of interparticle friction, and in par- ticular surface roughness, on the rheological properties of these particulate systems. The earliest study of Lootens et al. [9] showed that increasing surface roughness of colloidal particles shifts the shear-thickening transition to lower critical stresses. For non-colloidal viscous suspensions, the available experimental results show that increasing roughness leads to higher viscosities [10, 11] in qualitative agreement with numerical simulations [12, 13] using rather large value of  ( 0:5 1) to match the observations. The in uence of sf the interparticle friction has been mostly studied in numerical simulations for dry granular media [7, 14, 15]. No systematic experimental study has been undertaken in the very dense regime close to the jamming transition. The present work aims at lling this gap by using pressure-imposed rheometry which is particularly suitable to infer the singular rheological properties of particulate systems at the jamming transition [1, 16{19]. These rheological measurements are reported in section III, both for dry and immersed hard spheres, after presenting the materials and techniques in section II; conclusions are drawn in section IV. II. EXPERIMENTS A. Rheometry The experimental apparatus, depicted in Fig. 1(a), is a custom-made rheometer enabling pressure- and volume-imposed rheological measurements of dry or immersed granular materi- als. The granular sample is subjected to a simple shear in a plane-plane geometry consisting of a cylindrical annulus (of internal and external radii R = 43:95 mm and R = 90:28 mm, 1 2 respectively) that is attached to a bottom plate and is covered by a top plate. In order to obtain a linear shearing of the granular sample, the cylindrical annulus rotates at a constant angular velocity controlled by an asynchronous motor (Parvalux SD18) regulated by a fre- quency controller (OMRON MX2 0.4 kW) while the top plate does not rotate. A wide range of shear rate, _ , can be achieved, spanning between 0:02 and 130 s . The important feature of this rheometer is that the top plate is permeable to the uid but not to the particles, see a blowup of a picture of this plate in Fig. 1(c). It is manufactured with holes of size 2 5 mm 3 (a) Translation Stage (b) Precision scale ON/OFF Position sensor Torque sensor Solvent trap Spring (c) Top Plate Bottom Plate FIG. 1. (a) Sketch of the experimental apparatus. (b) Microscopic image of slightly and highly roughened polystyrene spheres. (c) Image of the top permeable plate showing the corrugated strips. enabling uid to ow through it but is also covered by a 0:24 mm nylon mesh designed to stop particles. This top plate can be moved vertically by using a linear positioning stage (Physics Instrumente M-521) and ts into the cylindrical annulus with a precision of 280 m. Both the top and bottom plates are also roughened by positioning corrugated strips of height and width 0.5 mm onto their surfaces, as seen in Fig. 1(c). This apparatus was initially built to study suspension rheology [17, 19] and has been adapted to make possible the investigation of dry granular material. An important ingredient was to create appropriate roughnesses on the top and bottom plates to enable bulk granular motion. Another important point was to operate the rheometer in an air-conditioned room (at 25 Celcius) with a high level of humidity (at a relative humidity of 80%) to avoid electrostatic e ects between the dry polystyrene particles. The shear stress,  , is deduced from the torque exerted on the top plate measured by a torque transducer (TEI - CFF401) connected to the top plate. The component of the normal stress perpendicular to the top plate, simply referred as the particle pressure P , is given by a precision scale (Mettler-Toledo XS6002S) attached to the translation stage. The bulk packing fraction of the sample, , can be adjusted by displacing the top plate. The plate position, h, is continuously measured by a position sensor (Novotechnik T-50). A feedback control system connects the positioning stage and the precision scale in order 4 to perform pressure-imposed experiments on the sample. In this pressure-imposed mode, the resulting shear stress,  , and packing fraction, , are measured as functions of shear rate, _ , for a set particle pressure, P , once steady state is established. Classical volume- imposed rheometry can also be performed by xing the top plate position, i.e. xing the volume fraction . In this volume-imposed mode, the shear stress,  , and particle pressure, P , are measured as functions of shear rate, _ , for a given volume fraction . Note that a soft spring is positioned between the top plate and the torque sensor to avoid blockage during highly dense experiments. A series of calibration experiments with a pure uid is also performed to infer the undesired friction from the central axis as well as the viscous contribution from the gap between top plate and cell walls. These e ects are subtracted to the torque measurements. Buoyancy e ects are also accounted for in the measurements of the normal force that the particles exert on the porous plate in the gradient direction. In immersed experiments performed in pressure- or volume-imposed modes, polystyrene particles, shown in Fig. 1(b), are suspended in a Newtonian uid (polyethylene glycol-ran- propylene glycol monobutylether) which has a matching density with the particles ( = 1056 kg/m at 25 Celcius) and a large viscosity ( = 2:01 Pa s at 25 Celcius). Air bubbles are removed by vacuum extraction and then by a long period of pre-shearing. In experiments with dry particles undertaken in the pressure-imposed mode, the cell is lled up to a given height by a rain-like procedure which provides a good homogeneous distribution of the particles within the cell. A small dispersion in size is required to avoid ordering. Ranges of imposed pressure (P = 60 380 Pa) and sample height (h < 16 mm) are chosen to avoid shear banding nucleation. It is important to stress that the smallest con ning pressure has to be larger than the hydrostatic pressure to avoid large inhomogeneity in the bulk. This results in a more limited range of  in the dry case. B. Manufacturing rough spheres Two set of spheres having di erent surface roughnesses but approximatively the same size are used in the experiments, see Figs. 1(b) and 2(b). The particles labeled \Slighly Roughened" (SR) correspond to rigid polystyrene particles (Dynoseeds TS 500) manufac- tured by Microbeads SA, having a density  = 1050 kg/m and an approximately Gaussian distribution in size with a mean diameter of d = 580 m. As can be seen in the right panel of 5 Rotating Axis (a) Eccentric Axis (b) Rolling bearing Toothed Constant Foam imposed load Rough Surfaces -100 X Range : 4.91 mm FIG. 2. (a) Top: Sketch of the particle roughening apparatus. Bottom: Confocal image of the upper rough surface. (b) Microscopic images of typical slightly (right) and highly (left) roughened spheres. Bottom: Corresponding confocal images of the particles surface. Fig. 2(b), these spheres are not perfectly smooth but possess some small surface roughnesses. The particles labeled \Highly Roughened" (HR) are produced by further roughening these polystyrene spheres, see the left panel of Fig. 2(b). The roughening procedure consists in forcing a continuous motion of the particles between two parallel rough plates resulting in a mechanical erosion of the particle surfaces. The particle-roughening apparatus is sketched in Fig. 2(a). Sandpapers (Walfcraft 80) cover both the top and bottom circular plates (20 cm in diameter) to avoid slippage. The bottom circular plate is xed while the displacement of its top counterpart is driven by an electrical stirring device having a shifted rotational-axis ( = 5 mm) with respect to the bottom-plate axis. Two rolling bearings transfer rotation into translation resulting in a circular movement. Circular translation instead of rotation ensures that the particle trajectory is independent of its location. Each particle thus experiences the same mechanical erosion. In addition, the top plate exerts a static load (1200 g) in order to amplify the impact on the particle surface. A toothed soft foam is also used to transfer the motion of the stirring device to the top plate while avoiding particle fracturing. A typical protocol consists in spreading 1 g of polystyrene spheres onto the bottom plate. Fixing the stirring frequency at 1:2 Hz results in a relative velocity between the plate of Y Range : 1.17 mm Z Range : 0.45 mm d i d R (m) R (m) R (m)    d (m) a q z sf sf rf SR 0:287 0:008 0:387 0:008 2:073 0:008 0:23 0:03 0:25 0:03 0:004 0:001 580 20 HR 1:896 0:008 2:410 0:008 9:808 0:008 0:37 0:03 0:35 0:03 0:007 0:001 540 20 TABLE I. Properties of the \Slightly Roughened" (SR) and \Highly Roughened" (HR) spheres: d i Roughness coecients (R ; R ; R ), sliding friction coecients ( and  in the dry and im- a q z sf sf mersed cases, respectively), rolling friction coecients ( in the dry case), and diameters (d). rf 37 mm/s. Fig. 2(b) shows the e ect of one hour of erosion for a representative individual sphere. A slightly reduction in particle size is observed resulting in a slightly smaller mean diameter for the HR spheres, d = 540 m. C. Characterizing rough spheres To provide some indications regarding the particle geometry, typical surface-roughness characteristics have been measured, see Fig. 2(b). Confocal scanning microscopy of speci- mens of SR and HR spheres has been performed on a surface region of 170170 m . Average roughness, R , standard deviation, R , and ten-point mean roughness, R = (j Z j + j Z j) a q z + (where Z and Z are the average of the 5 tallest peaks and the 5 lowest valleys, respec- tively), are computed after tting and then subtracting the spherical shape. Surface prop- erties of both batches of spherical particles are summarized in Table I. To characterize the interparticle sliding friction coecients, we perform controlled sliding- experiments using two parallels plates coated with a monolayer of polystyrene particles identical to those used in the rheological experiments. The beads are glued on both the top and bottom plates in a circular annulus geometry, as shown in Fig. 3(a),(c). Distributing spatially the glued particles in a random manner ensures to avoid any geometrical match between the facing surfaces during sliding. Frictional characteristics are explored by chang- ing the sliding velocity (8 6 v 6 160 mm/s) and the static load (40 6 P 6 180 Pa) imposed onto the sample by adding weights on the top plate. The resulting shear stress,  , is obtained by measuring the torque using a rheometer measuring head (Anton Paar DSR 502). This head is coupled to an horizontal rail which transfers the angular velocity to the top plate, see Fig. 3(a)-(b). The bottom plate is xed while top plate rotates. Controlled 7 (a) (b) (c) (d) 0 50 100 150 200 FIG. 3. Interparticle sliding friction experiment. (a) Lateral view of the setup (b) Top view showing the static-weight distribution on the top plate. (c) Bottom plate: the sample is a ring of e ective radius r = (r + r )=2 = 18:5 mm (r = 25 mm and r = 12 mm). (d) Plot of the shear 2 1 1 2 stress  versus the normal pressure P and corresponding linear ts for SR ( ) and HR () spheres in the dry (magenta and red, respectively) and immersed (cyan and blue, respectively) cases. experiments with a misaligned axis have been performed in order to verify that the contact area does not have any in uence on the torque measurements. We also check that there is no shear-rate dependence in  . The measured shear stress,  , is plotted as a function of the applied normal stress, P , in Fig. 3(d) for two batches of SR and HR spheres. Clearly, a linear dependence is observed. A linear t yields the slope, i.e. the sliding friction coecient, for each sample. The interparticle sliding friction coecients for SR and HR spheres are given d i in Table I in both dry and immersed situations,  and  respectively. The sliding friction sf sf coecient increases with increasing roughness but does not change signi cantly between dry or immersed conditions. In order to estimate the interparticle rolling friction coecients, we also conducted con- 8 (a) (b) 0.10 Rheometer SR Particles HR Particles Eccentric Axis 0.05 Rolling bearing Metallic Bead P P Toothed 0.00 Foam 0.0 2.5 5.0 7.5 10.0 F (N) Smooth Surfaces FIG. 4. Interparticle rolling friction experiment. (a) Lateral view of the setup (b) Plot of the rolling force, F , versus the applied normal force, F , and corresponding linear ts for SR ( ) R N and HR () spheres in a dry situation. trolled rolling-experiments using a device with a design similar to the particle-roughening apparatus of Fig. 2(a). The bottom plate is xed while the top plate performs a translational motion with a shifted rotational-axis ( = 5 mm) with respect to the bottom-plate axis, see Fig. 4(a). The particles which are sandwiched between these two plates experience the same rolling motion. The surfaces of the plates have been chosen to be rather smooth to avoid any impact on the measurements. The rolling force, F , exerted on the particles is obtained by measuring the torque using a rheometer measuring head (Anton Paar DSR 502). This force is plotted as a function of the applied normal force, F , in Fig. 4(b) for the SR and HR spheres. The interparticle rolling friction coecient,  , increases with roughness but rf is found to be always much smaller than the sliding friction coecient, see Table I. III. EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS We display rst the rheological measurements in Fig. 5(a) and (b) by plotting the e ective friction coecient,  = =P , and the bulk volume fraction, , as a function of the viscous number, J =  _=P , for the immersed particles and as function of the inertial number, I = d _  =P , for the dry particles. A remarkable result is that  is not signi cantly F (N) R (a) (b)0.60 2.5 Immersed SR Immersed HR 0.55 2.0 Dry SR Dry RH 1.5 φ 0.50 1.0 0.45 0.5 0.40 − 4 − 3 − 2 − 1 − 4 − 3 − 2 − 1 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 J, I J, I (c) 2.0 (d) 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.0 0.5 1.0 0.0 1.0 0.0 0.1 0.2 0.5 1 − φ/φ 0.5 0.0 − 4 − 3 − 2 − 1 0.40 0.45 0.50 0.55 0.60 10 10 10 10 φ 1 − φ/φ FIG. 5. (a) E ective friction coecient,  = =P , and (b) volume fraction, , versus the viscous number, J =  _=P , for the immersed case (blue and cyan colors) and versus the inertial number, I = d _ P= , for the dry case (red and magenta colors), for SR ( ) and HR () spheres. The dashed lines are the linear regressions in J (immersed case) and in I (dry case), see Table II. (c) E ective friction coecient,  = =P , versus volume fraction, . (d) Rescaled friction coe- cient,   , versus rescaled volume fraction, 1 = . The inset shows the same data in linear c c scales. The black dashed lines are the linear regressions in 1 = for the dry and the immersed cases. a ected by an increase in particle roughness (or in interparticle friction). Conversely, there is a conspicuous shift of (J ) for the immersed case and (I ) for the dry case toward lower values of  with increasing surface roughness (or interparticle friction). The semi-logarithmic plots of Fig. 5(a) and (b) are particularly amenable to a close ex- = /P = /P c models label c c 1=2 / J SR 0:37 0:01 0:584 0:002 Viscous (immersed) 1=2 / J HR 0:36 0:01 0:565 0:002 / I SR 0:36 0:01 0:587 0:002 Inertial (dry) / I HR 0:36 0:01 0:563 0:002 TABLE II. Values of  and  for the SR and HR spheres in the immersed and dry cases. c c amination of the jamming transition, and in particular show that both  and  tend to nite measurable values,  and  respectively, at the jamming point. The critical (or maximum c c owable) volume fraction,  , and friction coecient,  , can be measured by tting the c c data using a linear regression in J [1] or in I [2] in the immersed or dry cases, respectively, as summarized in Table II and shown by the dashed lines of Fig. 5(a) and (b). The critical volume fraction,  , happens to be similar within error bars in the immersed and dry cases and shows a decrease with increasing roughness (or interparticle friction). The value of measured for the SR spheres is found to be similar to those obtained (  0:585) in previous immersed experiments by [1, 17] but di ers with that obtained (  0:625) in the dry case by [18]. The values of  for the immersed and dry cases are similar within error bars and do not signi cantly di er for the SR and HR spheres. They are slightly larger than those found previously (  0:30 0:32) in the immersed case by [1, 17] and much larger than that obtained (  0:26 0:27) in the dry case by [18]. The present value of 0.36 corresponds to a friction angle of 20 degree which is close to the typical pile angles observed for spherical particles. Fig. 5(c) shows that  presents a quasi-linear decrease in  but with di erent slopes for the dry and immersed cases. By rescaling  by   and  by 1 = , good collapses of c c the data for the two di erent roughnesses are obtained in Fig. 5(d) for the dry and immersed cases, respectively. A linear regression, ()  / (1 = ), yields a decent t of all the c c i v data with coecients of proportionality a  3:52 in the (dry) inertial case and a  8:05 in the (immersed) viscous case, see the inset of Fig. 5(d) and the inset of Fig. 7(c). We now turn to a detailed examination of the rheological data obtained in the viscous (immersed) case in Fig. 6. Rescaling  by  provides a complete collapse of all the data for both the SR and HR spheres. In addition to the frictional description displayed in 11 (a) (b) 3 3 10 -2 10 -2 3 3 10 10 2 2 10 10 1 1 10 10 τ − 2 − 1 − 2 − 1 10 10 10 10 2 2 10 10 (φ − φ )/φ (φ − φ )/φ c c c c 1 1 10 10 0.7 0.8 0.9 1.0 0.7 0.8 0.9 1.0 φ/φ φ/φ c c (c) 2.0 (d) 1.0 1.0 0.9 1.5 0.9 0.8 − 4 − 3 − 2 − 1 1.0 10 10 10 10 0.8 0.5 − 4 − 3 − 2 − 1 10 10 10 10 0.7 0.00 0.05 0.10 0.15 0.00 0.05 0.10 0.15 J J FIG. 6. Rheological data in the immersed case: (a)  = = _ and (b)  = P= _ versus = as s n c well as (c)  = =P =  = and (d)  versus J . The insets of graphs (a,b) and (c,d) are log-log s n and semi-log plots, respectively. The dashed lines correspond to the best ts using the models summarized in Table II and the linear variation () =  + a (1 = ) as a leading expansion. c c Fig. 6(c) and (d), we provide the classical viscosity description in Fig. 6(a) and (b). The shear,  = = _ , and normal,  = P= _ , relative viscosities increase with increasing s n and diverge asymptotically at the maximum owable volume fraction,  . The log-log plot shown in the inset of Fig. 6(b) reveals that  diverges as (1 = ) near jamming. Note n c that since by construction J = 1= , the relation  / (1 = ) con rms the relation n n c 1=2 ( ) / J evidenced in Fig. 5(b) for the immersed case. The shear viscosity,  , is c s determined by the rheological law  () = () (), where () is given by the leading s n v 2 expansion () =  + a (1 = ) introduced in Fig. 5(d). The divergence in (1 = ) c c c = /η ˙ s f = P/η ˙ φ/φ n f c 6 (a) 10 (b) 6 6 10 10 4 -2 4 -2 10 10 2 2 10 10 − 3 − 2 − 1 − 3 − 2 − 1 τ 10 10 10 10 10 10 (φ − φ )/φ (φ − φ )/φ c c c c 0.96 0.97 0.98 0.99 1.00 0.96 0.97 0.98 0.99 1.00 φ/φ φ/φ c c (c)0.55 (d) 1.00 0.1 0.50 1.00 0.98 0.0 0.45 0.98 0.00 0.02 0.04 (φ − φ )/φ c c 0.96 0.40 0.96 0.0 0.1 0.35 − 3 − 2 − 1 − 3 − 2 − 1 10 10 10 10 10 10 I I 2 2 2 2 FIG. 7. Rheological data in the dry case: (a)  = = d _ and (b)  = P= d _ versus I p II p = as well as (c)  = =P =  = and (d)  versus I . The insets of graphs (a,b) and (d) are c s n log-log and linear plots, respectively. The dashed lines correspond to the best ts using the models summarized in Table II and the linear variation () =  + a (1 = ) as a leading expansion. c c The inset of graph (c) shows the rescaled friction coecient,   , versus the rescaled volume fraction, 1 = , together with this leading expansion. dominates close to jamming. An analogous data representation for the inertial (dry) case is displayed in Fig. 7 and shows a decent collapse of the data when rescaling  by  . While the collapse is excellent in the quasi-static regime, discrepancies arise as I & 10 . The shear and normal stresses 2 2 are normalized by the Bagnold scaling,  d _ [20]. This scaling de nes two dimensionless 2 2 2 2 functions of the volume fraction,  = = d _ and  = P= d _ , which diverge when I p II p 2 2 = /ρ d ˙ I p φ/φ 2 2 = P/ρ d ˙ II p approaching the maximum volume fraction,  . The function  is seen to diverge as c II (1 = ) near jamming as evidenced in the inset of Fig. 7(b). This is consistent with the relation ( ) / I observed in Fig. 5(b) for the dry case since  = 1=I , see also the c II inset of Fig. 7(d). The other dimensionless function is given by  () = () () and has I II again a leading divergence in (1 = ) near jamming. A detailed display of (I ), (I ), and () is also provided in Fig. 7(c) and (d). The rheological data of Figs. 5, 6, 7 are given as Supplemental Material. IV. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS In this work, we have examined how particle roughness a ects the rheological properties of particulate systems in both immersed and dry conditions. We have used two batches of spherical particles, a batch of \slightly roughened" regular spheres (SR) and another batch of \highly roughened" spheres (HR) produced by further roughening these regular spheres. We have provided a detailed characterization of these particles, and more precisely determined their surface-roughness characteristics and their interparticle sliding and rolling friction co- ecients using custom-made experimental devices. We have then performed pressure- and volume-imposed measurements of the rheology of theses two batches of spheres in the dense regime. An important nding of the present study is the examination of the rheological behavior in the vicinity of the jamming transition in the dry and immersed cases. In the limit of vanishing shear rate, the critical values for the e ective friction coecient,  , and for the volume fraction,  , are found to be similar for suspensions and dry granular media. This seems to imply that hydrodynamic interactions are inconsequential and contact forces are prevailing in this quasi-static limit. A striking result is that  is not signi cantly a ected by particle roughness while  decreases with increasing roughness. This later nding shows that the granular system needs to dilate more in order to ow when roughness is increased. Rescaling the volume fraction, , by this maximum volume fraction,  , leads to an excellent collapse of all the data on master curves for the e ective friction coecient (or stress ratio), , as well as for the shear and normal stresses,  and P respectively, normalized by a viscous 2 2 scaling ( _ ) in the immersed case and by an inertial scaling ( d _ ) in the dry case. The excellent collapse of the experimental data by using the reduced volume fraction, 14 relations exponent present predictions simulations simulations work (frictionless) (frictionless) (frictional) / J 0:5 0:35[22] 0.32[22] 0:5[23, 24] Viscous (immersed)   / J 2 2:83[22] 2.77[22] 2[23, 24] / ( ) 1.5-1.6[13, 25] 2.3[13],1.9[25] s;n c / I 1 0:35[22] 0.38[26] 1[27] Inertial (dry)   / I 1 0:35[22] 0.39[26] 1[27] / ( ) I;II c TABLE III. Critical exponents found in the present work versus predicted and numerical values. = , has been previously observed for the shear viscosity in the suspension case [6], but without a controlled study of the in uence of roughness and friction. Similar behavior has been also observed in numerical simulations when interparticle friction is increased [12, 13]. However these simulations match the present experimental  for interparticle sliding friction coecients (  0:5 1) quite larger than those experimentally measured ( = 0:23 for sf sf the SR spheres and = 0:37 for the HR spheres). It is likely that rolling friction (with experimental coecients  = 0:0043 for the SR spheres and = 0:0070 for the HR spheres) sf is somehow captured by using larger sliding friction coecients as studied in granular media by [21]. The present work not only yields the quasi-static values but also the asymptotic behaviors of  and  in the vicinity of the jamming transition. The departures of the e ective friction coecient and of the volume fraction from their static limits,   and  , are found c c to vary as the square root of the viscous number in the immersed case, i.e. / J , and linearly with the inertial number in the dry case, i.e. / I . The present experimental data for the suspensions of the two batches of SR and HR spheres also reveal that both relative shear and normal viscosities,  and  , present a similar algebraic divergence in s n ( ) as previously observed for a variety of diverse suspensions of frictional spheres [1, 6]. Interestingly, the analogous dimensionless functions obtained by normalizing the shear and normal stresses with an inertial scaling in the dry case,  and  , present the same I II dominant algebraic divergence. The critical exponents found in the present experiments are compared in Table III to the 15 theoretical predictions [22] which have been obtained for frictionless spheres and to results of various numerical simulations performed in two dimensions [22, 23] as well as in three dimensions [13, 24{27] for dry and immersed spheres with and without frictional interactions. They are in good agreement with the frictional simulations, in particular those performed in three dimensions. It is nonetheless dicult to assess what is the prevailing dissipation regime. The J  diagram proposed by [8] suggests that the immersed experiments lies sf between the rolling and frictional-sliding regimes while the I  diagram proposed by [7] sf seems to indicate that the dry experiments belong to the frictional-sliding regime. However, the rolling friction is not accounted for in these studies. Finally, the present work may shed some light on the transition between the viscous and inertial regimes which is far from being fully understood and still a subject of debate [22{ 24]. Assuming that this transition arises when the viscous and inertial stresses are matched, the crossover shear-rate is then _ = ( = d )  ()= (). The similar divergence of v!i f p s I the functions  () and  () found here seems to suggest that _ is independent of the s I v!i volume fraction close to the jamming transition. 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Published: Apr 25, 2019

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