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Orbital dynamics in realistic galaxy models: NGC 3726, NGC 3877 and NGC 4010

Orbital dynamics in realistic galaxy models: NGC 3726, NGC 3877 and NGC 4010 In the present paper, using a generalization of the Miyamoto and Nagai potential we adjusted the observed rotation curves of three specific spiral galaxies to the analytical circular velocities. The observational data have been taken from a 21 cm-line synthesis imaging survey using the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope, for three particular galaxies in the Ursa Major cluster: NGC 3726, NGC 3877 and NGC 4010. Accordingly, the dynamics of the system is analyzed in terms of the Poincar´e sections method, finding that for larger values of the angular momentum of the test particle or lower values its total energy the dynamics is mainly regular, while on the opposite cases, the dynamics is mainly chaotic. Our toy model opens the possibility to find chaotic bounded orbits for stars in those particular galaxies. Key words: Stellar dynamics; Galaxies: kinematics and dynamics; Nonlinear dynamics and chaos. Din´amica orbital en modelos realistas de gal´axias: NGC 3726, NGC 3877 y NGC 4010 Resumen En el presente trabajo, utilizando una generalizacio´n del potencial de Miyamoto-Nagai, se ajustan las curvas de rotacio´n observadas de tres galaxias espirales a las velocidades circulares anal´ıticas. Los datos observacionales se tomaron de un conjunto de im´agenes de l´ınea de 21 cent´ımetros (o l´ınea HI) obtenidos con el Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT), para tres galaxias particulares en el grupo de la Ursa Major: NGC 3726, NGC 3877 y NGC 4010. Seguidamente, se analiza la din´amica del sistema en t´erminos del m´etodo de secciones de Poincar´e, encontrando que para valores grandes del momento angular de la part´ıcula de prueba o valores bajos su energ´ıa total, la din´amica es principalmente regular, mientras que en los casos opuestos, la din´amica es principalmente cao´tica. Nuestro modelo abre la posibilidad de encontrar ´orbitas cao´ticas acotadas para estrellas presentes en esas galaxias particulares. Palabras clave: Din´amica estelar, Galaxias: cinem´atica y din´amica, Din´amica no lineal y caos. Introduction analytical models which closely approximate the light distri- bution for spherical and elliptical galaxies, respectively. A few years later, Long & Murali (1992) presented an analytical Since the seminal paper by Miyamoto & Nagai (1975), the potential for barred galaxies that reduces to the Miyamoto- literature on three-dimensional analytical models for the grav- Nagai disk by an appropriate setting of the free parameters, itational field of different types of galaxies has grown consider- while Dehnen (1993) generalized the Jaffe and Hernquist mod- ably. In this respect, particular attention deserve the models els by means of a family of density profiles with different central proposed by Jaffe (1983) and Hernquist (1990), who derived Correspondencia: G. A. Gonz´alez, guillermo.gonzalez@saber.uis.edu.co, Recibido: 5 de octubre de 2018; Aceptado: 14 de febrero de arXiv:1907.09573v1 [astro-ph.GA] 22 Jul 2019 slopes. More recently, Vogt & Letelier (2005) derived an an- radial and vertical perturbations. On the other hand, the dy- alytical expression for the gravitational field of galaxies, based namics of the orbits is studied through the Poincar´e surfaces on the multipolar expansion up to the quadrupole term. Using of section, showing that the orbital motion exhibits a strong a different approach, Gonz´alez et al. (2010) obtained a family dependence on the angular momentum and energy of the test of finite thin-discs models for four galaxies in the Ursa major particles (stars). cluster in which the circular velocities were adjusted to fit the The paper is organized as follows: in the first section, we de- observed rotation curves. rive the generalized Miyamoto-Nagai model. Next, from the One advantage of an analytical galaxy model is the possibil- new potential the explicit expressions for the physical quanti- ity to study the dynamics (regular or chaotic) of orbits. This ties of interest are determined. In the second section we adjust can be considered one of the standing problems in galactic the observed rotation curves of three specific spiral galaxies dynamics because it could allow us to understand the for- (NGC 3726, NGC 3877 and NGC 4010) to the analytical circu- mation and evolution of galaxies (Contopoulos, 1979), as lar velocities derived with our model. Then, the mass-density shown by the pioneer simulations of Lindblad (1960). De- profiles are calculated, along with the vertical and epicyclic fre- spite the fact that early papers on this topic studied only regu- quencies, showing that our model not only is well-behaved but lar orbits in the meridional plane (Martinet & Mayer, 1975, also satisfy the stability conditions. A dynamical analysis in Manabe, 1979, Greiner, 1987, Lees & Schwarzschild, terms of the Poincar´e surfaces of section is performed in the 1992), soon after, the existence of chaos on the orbital mo- third section. Finally, in the fourth section, we summarize our tion started to be considered by Caranicolas (1996) and main conclusions. Caranicolas & Papadopoulos (2003). In the majority of cases all these studies focused on the distinction between Generalized Miyamoto-Nagai model regular and chaotic orbits (Manos & Athanassoula, 2011, Bountis et. al., 2012, Manos et al., 2013) or the influence of the galaxy components (nucleus, bulge, disk, halo) on the char- Let us start considering the axially symmetric Laplace’s equa- acter of orbits, see e.g. (Zotos, 2012, Zotos & Caranicolas, tion in spherical coordinates 2013, Zotos, 2014). Notwithstanding the evidence that both 1 ∂ ∂Φ 1 ∂ ∂Φ 2 2 ∇ Φ(r, θ) = r + sin θ = 0, (1) chaotic and regular motions are possible in many axisymmet- 2 2 r ∂r ∂r r sin θ ∂θ ∂θ ric potentials, recent studies on generalized axisymmetric po- whose general solution reads as tentials suggest that a third integral of motion seems to exist for energy values closer to the escape energy (Dubeibe et al., l −(l+1) Φ(r, θ) = A r − B r P (cos θ), (2) l l l 2018, Zotos et al., 2018). Hence, such apparent ambiguity l=0 might only be solved by performing systematic studies of each where A and B are constants to be determined, P are the l l l particular model. Legendre polynomials, and the notation (r, θ, φ) means (radial, In this paper, we are interested in meridional motions of polar, azimuthal) coordinates, respectively. free test particles (stars) in presence of analytical realistic Since Φ(r, θ) denotes the gravitational potential of an ax- galaxy models. Our models possess axial symmetry, which is isymmetric finite distribution of mass, the boundary condition a good approximation given the morphology of galaxies that lim Φ(r, θ) = 0 must be satisfied, thus the solution (2) r→∞ are mainly approximate figures of revolution. Additionally, the takes the form galaxy components were not added one by one, instead of this, we derived a generalized Miyamoto-Nagai model that can be B P (cos θ) l l Φ(r, θ) = − . (3) l+1 adjusted very accurately to fit the observed rotation curve and l=0 hence it is assumed that all (or most of) the components are Following Vogt & Letelier (2005), in order to obtain a gener- taken into account. The determination of the specific values alized Miyamoto-Nagai model and for the sake of simplicity, we of the coefficients of the series expansion let us calculate the shall consider terms up to l = 3 in (3), therefore, transforming corresponding surface densities and all the kinematic quantities to cylindrical coordinates (R, z) by means of the relations characterizing the particular galaxy models. Unlike the models derived by Gonz´alez et al. (2010), which exhibit instabilities 2 2 cos θ = z/r and r = R + z , (4) to small vertical perturbations (see e.g. the cases of NGC 3877 and applying the additional transformation (Satoh, 1980), and NGC 4010), our models satisfy the stability conditions for 2 2 z → z = a + z + b , (5) with a and b two arbitrary parameters, the generalized poten- square curve fitting method allows us to calculate the numer- tial takes the form ical values of the parameters for each particular galaxy. The ∗ ˜ ˜ ˜ ˜ resulting values of a˜, b, B , B , B , and B , for the three galax- 0 1 2 3 B B z 0 1 Φ(R, z) = −p − 3/2 ies under consideration, are given in Table 1. 2 2 ∗2 2 ∗ (R + z ) R + z 2 ∗2 2 ∗ ∗3 B R − 2z B 3R z − 2z 2 3 NGC 3726 NGC 3877 NGC 4010 + . (6) 5/2 7/2 2 2 2 ∗ 2 ∗ 2 (R + z ) 2 (R + z ) a˜ 0.6773 0.8491 1.143 −6 −7 −6 b −1.045 × 10 −2.929 × 10 −9.568 × 10 4 4 4 B −7.183 × 10 −9.859 × 10 −3.146 × 10 Once the potential has been specified, the mass-density distri- 0 5 5 4 bution Σ can be calculated directly from Poisson equation, B 1.342 × 10 1.820 × 10 4.735 × 10 4 5 4 B −8.337 × 10 −1.098 × 10 1.464 × 10 2 2 2 1 ∂ Φ 1 ∂Φ ∂ Φ 4 4 3 Σ = + + , (7) B 2.616 × 10 3.674 × 10 −7.815 × 10 2 2 4πG ∂R R ∂R ∂z while the circular velocity v of particles in the galactic plane, Table 1. Parameters for each particular galaxy model. the epicyclic frequency k, and the vertical frequency ν of small oscillations about the equilibrium circular orbit, can be ob- HaL HbL tained from the following expressions evaluated at z = 0 1.0 (Binney & Tremaine, 2011) 0.8 ∂Φ v = R , (8) 0.6 ∂R 0.4 ∂ Φ 3 ∂Φ k = + , (9) 2 50 ∂R R ∂R 0.2 ∂ Φ 0.0 ν = . (10) 0 0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 ∂z Ž Ž R R From (8-10), it is important to emphasize that a feasible model HcL must satisfy the constraints set by the conditions v ≥ 0, 0.10 2 2 k ≥ 0, and ν ≥ 0, where the last two inequalities are un- derstood as stability conditions (Vogt & Letelier, 2005). 0.05 0.00 As is evident from the preceding paragraphs, the galactic mod- els and its associated physical quantities are uniquely deter- - 0.05 mined by the set of constants a, b, B , B , B , and B , which 0 1 2 3 - 0.10 (taking a pragmatic approach) can be estimated from the ob- - 1.0 - 0.5 0.0 0.5 1.0 servational data of the corresponding rotation curves, as we will discuss in detail in the next section. HdL HeL 1.0 1.0 0.8 0.8 Rotation curves fitting 0.6 0.6 0.4 0.4 The observational data were taken from Verheijen & Sancisi 0.2 0.2 (2001) for three specific galaxies in the Ursa Major cluster: NGC 3726, NGC 3877 and NGC 4010. Following the procedure 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 outlined in Gonza´lez et al. (2010), we take the galaxy radius Ž Ž R R R as the given by the largest tabulated value of the data. Thus, introducing dimensionless variables R = R/R , z˜ = d Figure 1. Model fitted to the rotation curve of NGC 3726 ˜ ˜ ˜ z/R , a˜ = a/R , b = b/R and setting B = B /R , B = d d d 0 0 d 1 using the parameters given in the first column of Table 1. (a) 2 3 4 ˜ ˜ B /R , B = B /R , and B = B /R , the nonlinear least The solid curve indicates the rotation velocity calculated from 1 2 2 3 3 d d d It should be noted that setting B = GM,B = B = B = 0 in (6), we get the well-known Miyamoto-Nagai Potential 0 1 2 3 (Miyamoto & Nagai, 1975). Ž v Hkm sL Ž2 S (8) while the error bars denote the velocity dispersions of the NGC 4010. The solid lines correspond to the analytical ex- observational data. (b) Normalized mass-density distribution pressions (8) fitted to the rotation curves. As can be seen, in Σ at z = 0, calculated from (7). (c) Constant-density curves of each case the model fits the observed data with good accuracy. equation (7) in the meridional plane. (d) Epicyclic frequency Additionally, in panels (b) of Figures 1, 2, and 3, we plot the (9) evaluated on z = 0. (e) Vertical frequency (10) evaluated normalized mass-density distribution (7) at z = 0 for the three on z = 0. galaxies, as a function of the dimensionless radial coordinate R. Here, we obtain a well-behaved mass-density function, showing a maximum value at the center that decreases to zero at the HaL HbL 1.0 edge of the disk. On the other hand, in panels (c) of Figures 1, 2, and 3, we present four isodensity curves of the mass-density 0.8 distribution (7) in the meridional plane (R, z˜), showing that 0.6 100 each model corresponds to a very different mass distribution. 0.4 Finally, from panels (d) and (e) of the same figures, it is note- worthy that in the three cases the stability conditions are fully 0.2 satisfied. 0.0 0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 Ž Ž R R HaL HbL 1.0 HcL 0.10 0.8 0.05 � 0.6 0.00 0.4 0.2 - 0.05 0.0 - 0.10 0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 - 1.0 - 0.5 0.0 0.5 1.0 Ž Ž R R HcL HdL HeL 0.10 1.0 1.0 0.8 0.8 0.05 0.6 0.6 0.00 0.4 0.4 - 0.05 0.2 0.2 - 0.10 - 1.0 - 0.5 0.0 0.5 1.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 Ž Ž HdL HeL R R 1.0 1.0 Figure 2. Model fitted to the rotation curve of NGC 3877 us- 0.8 0.8 ing the parameters given in the second column of Table 1. (a) 0.6 0.6 The solid curve indicates the rotation velocity calculated from (8) while the error bars denote the velocity dispersions of the 0.4 0.4 observational data. (b) Normalized mass-density distribution 0.2 0.2 Σ at z = 0, calculated from (7). (c) Constant-density curves of equation (7) in the meridional plane. (d) Epicyclic frequency 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 (9) evaluated on z = 0. (e) Vertical frequency (10) evaluated Ž Ž R R on z = 0. Figure 3. Model fitted to the rotation curve of NGC 4010 In panels (a) of Figures 1, 2, and 3, we show the obser- using the parameters given in the third column of Table 1. (a) vational data (points) of the rotation curve with the cor- The solid curve indicates the rotation velocity calculated from responding velocity dispersions (error bars) as reported by (8) while the error bars denote the velocity dispersions of the Verheijen & Sancisi (2001) for NGC 3726, NGC 3877 and observational data. (b) Normalized mass-density distribution Ž v Hkm sL Ž2 v Hkm sL Ž 2 Ν Ž S ˜ Σ at z = 0, calculated from (7). (c) Constant-density curves of Since the Hamiltonian is autonomous, H is an integral of mo- equation (7) in the meridional plane. (d) Epicyclic frequency tion (9) evaluated on z = 0. (e) Vertical frequency (10) evaluated on z = 0. H(R, z, p , p ) = H(R , z , p , p ) = h, (19) R z 0 0 R z 0 0 with h the energy of an orbit. Stellar Dynamics The existence of an analytic integral of motion reduces the phase space dimensionality, and hence the Poincar´e surface of It is a well-known fact that using rough estimates of the dimen- section is an appropriate and well-established method to ana- sions of typical stars and galaxies, the collision interval between lyze the dynamics of the system. Taking into account the axial stars is about 10 times longer than the average age for most symmetry associated to the system, it is customary to choose galaxies (Binney & Tremaine, 2011). This implies that the the equatorial plane z = 0 as the Poincar´e plane in order to star’s motion can be determined solely by the gravitational at- ˜ ˜ represent the surface of sections in the (R, R)-plane. The orbits traction of the galaxy and that collisions between stars are so were numerically integrated forward in time for 1000 units of rare that are irrelevant (Maoz, 2016). Therefore, as a first ap- time by using a Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg Method (RKF45), with proximation, the orbital dynamics of a star in a given galaxy this setting the numerical error related to the conservation of can be studied following the usual Lagrangian and Hamiltonian −14 the energy is at most 10 . In all cases we set z = p = 0 0 R approaches for the motion of a test particle in the presence of and we scan the phase space with a large number of initial con- an estimated gravitational potential. ditions for the radii R , these three values allow us to determine the values of p through the relation (19). The orbital motion of a test particle in an axisymmetric poten- 0 tial is governed by the Lagrangian h i 2 2 2 ˙ ˙ L = R + (Rφ) + z˙ − Φ(R, z), (11) with (R, φ, z) the usual cylindrical coordinates. The general- ized canonical momenta read as ˙ ˙ p = R, p = R φ, p = z˙, (12) R φ z and the Hamiltonian takes the form 2 2 H = p + p + Φ (R, z), (13) eff R z with Φ (R, z) = + Φ(R, z). (14) eff 2R Here, L = p =constant, denotes the conserved component of angular momentum about the z-axis. From (13), the resulting Hamilton’s equations of motion can be expressed as R = p , (15) z˙ = p , (16) L ∂Φ(R, z) p˙ = − , (17) R ∂R ∂Φ(R, z) p˙ = − , (18) ∂z where Φ(R, z) is given by Eq. (6) and its respective parameters Figure 4. Poincar´e surfaces of section of NGC 3726 for differ- should be taken from Table 1. ent values of angular momentum L with h = −1. z Figure 5. Poincar´e surfaces of section of NGC 3726 for differ- Figure 7. Poincar´e surfaces of section of NGC 3877 for differ- ent values of total energy h with L = 1. ent values of total energy h with L = 1. z z Figure 6. Poincar´e surfaces of section of NGC 3877 for differ- Figure 8. Poincar´e surfaces of section of NGC 4010 for differ- ent values of angular momentum L with h = −1. ent values of angular momentum L with h = −10. z z epicyclic frequencies, showing that unlike the results presented in Gonz´alez et al. (2010) for NGC 3877 and NGC 4010, our models satisfy the stability conditions for radial and vertical perturbations. Even though the set of models presented here should be considered as a rough approximation, the circular velocities were shown to fit very accurately to the observed rotation curves and in the three cases the stability conditions were fully satisfied. Here, it is important to note that con- trary to the observed tendency in the Miyamoto-Nagay model, where the limit a → 0 reduces to the Plummer sphere, our models exhibit a tendency to an spherical mass distribution with increasing of the parameter a. On the other hand, by using the Poincar´e section method we have also studied the dynamics of the meridional orbits of stars in presence of the gravitational field of the galaxy models. From our results it may be inferred that there exists an increase in the regularity of the orbits for larger values of the angular mo- mentum, while for larger values of energy the orbits tend to be more chaotic. Our toy models suggest that in the three galaxy models chaotic orbits are possible, however the chaotic behavior is very weak for the NGC 3877 model in compari- son to NGC 3726 and NGC 4010. It should be noted that Figure 9. Poincar´e surfaces of section of NGC 4010 for differ- none of the studied models showed a fully chaotic phase space. ent values of total energy h with L = 5. Our results could have significant implications for the study of the dynamics and kinematics of these three specific galaxies, The transition from regularity to chaos (or viceversa) that takes since the regular or chaotic behaviors could shed lights into the place for the three considered galaxy models was inspected evolution and structure of these galaxies, i.e., in phase space, through the Poincar´e sections in Figs. 4-9, by using different regular orbits are trapped in the vicinity of neighbor orbits, values of L (Figs. 4, 6 and 8) and h (Figs. 5, 7 and 9). It can while chaotic orbits, by its own nature, will diverge exponen- be observed that the orbital motion exhibits a strong depen- tially in time from its neighbors by filling the phase space in dence on the angular momentum L and energy h of the test an erratic manner. particle. In particular, from the surfaces of section presented in Figs. 4, 6, and 8, we may infer that there exists an increase in the regularity of the system for larger values of the angular momentum L , i.e. if there exists a chaotic sea the increase Acknowledgments of L will fill the phase with KAM islands, while the opposite effect is observed for larger values of energy h (see Figs. 5, 7, and 9), where the KAM islands deform and shrink giving place We would like to thank the anonymous referees for their use- to larger regions of chaos. ful comments and remarks, which improved the clarity and quality of the manuscript. FLD, SMM and GAG gratefully ac- knowledges the financial support provided by COLCIENCIAS (Colombia) under Grants No. 8840 and 8863. Concluding remarks In the present paper, using the general solution to the Laplace equation, we have derived a generalized Miyamoto-Nagai po- Authors’ contributions tential. By means of the nonlinear least square fitting, the analytical velocity curves were adjusted to the observed ones of three specific spiral galaxies: NGC 3726, NGC 3877 and All authors make substantial contributions to conception, de- NGC 4010. The resulting analytical models were used to de- sign, analysis and interpretation of data. All authors partici- termine the mass-density distributions and the vertical and pate in drafting the article and reviewed the final manuscript. Conflict of interest Lindblad, P. O. (1960). Stockholm Obs. Ann. 21, No. 3-4. Long, K., Murali, C. (1992). Analytical potentials for barred galaxies. The Astrophysical Journal, 397, 44-48. The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest. Manabe, S. (1979). Applicability of approximate third integral of motion for stellar orbits in the galaxy. Publications of the Astro- nomical Society of Japan, 31, 369-394. References Manos, T. and Athanassoula, E. (2011). Regular and chaotic orbits in barred galaxies-I. Applying the SALI/GALI method to explore their distribution in several models. Monthly Notices of Binney, J. and Tremaine, S. (2011). Galactic dynamics. Prince- the Royal Astronomical Society, 415(1), 629-642. ton university press. Manos, T., Bountis, T. and Skokos, C. (2013). Interplay be- Bountis, T., Manos, T. and Antonopoulos, C. (2012). Com- tween chaotic and regular motion in a time-dependent barred plex statistics in Hamiltonian barred galaxy models. Celestial Me- galaxy model. Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoreti- chanics and Dynamical Astronomy, 113(1), 63-80. cal, 46(25), 254017. Caranicolas, N. D. (1996). The structure of motion in a 4- Maoz, D. (2016). Astrophysics in a Nutshell: Second Edition. component galaxy mass model. Astrophysics and Space Science, Princeton university press. 246(1), 15-28. Martinet, L. and Mayer, F. (1975). Galactic orbits and integrals Caranicolas, N. D. and Papadopoulos, N. J (2003). Chaotic of motion for stars of old galactic populations. III-Conclusions and orbits in a galaxy model with a massive nucleus. Astronomy & applications. Astronomy and Astrophysics, 44, 45-57. Astrophysics, 399(3), 957-960. Miyamoto, M. and Nagai, R. (1975). Three-dimensional mod- Contopoulos, G. (1979). Stochastic behavior in classical and quan- els for the distribution of mass in galaxies. Publications of the tum Hamiltonian systems, G. Casati and J. Ford Eds., p. 1-17. Astronomical Society of Japan, 27, 533-543. Dehnen, W. (1993). A family of potential-density pairs for spherical Satoh, C. (1980). Dynamical models of axisymmetric galaxies and galaxies and bulges. Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical their applications to the elliptical galaxy NGC4697. Publications Society, 265(1), 250-256. of the Astronomical Society of Japan, 32, 41. Dubeibe, F. L. and Bermu´dez-Almanza, L. D. (2014). Opti- Verheijen, M. A. W. and Sancisi, R. (2001). The Ursa Ma- mal conditions for the numerical calculation of the largest Lya- jor cluster of galaxies-IV. HI synthesis observations. Astronomy punov exponent for systems of ordinary differential equations. In- & Astrophysics, 370(3), 765-867. ternational Journal of Modern Physics C, 25(07), 1450024. Vogt, D. and Letelier, P. S. (2005). On multipolar analytical Dubeibe, F. L., Rian˜o-Doncel, A., and Zotos, E. E (2018). potentials for galaxies. Publications of the Astronomical Society Dynamical analysis of bounded and unbounded orbits in a gener- of Japan, 57(6), 871-875. alized H´enon-Heiles system. Physics Letters A, 382(13), 904-910. Zotos, E. E. (2012). Exploring the nature of orbits in a galactic Gonz´alez, G. A., Plata-Plata, S. M. and Ramos-Caro J. model with a massive nucleus. New Astronomy, 17(6), 576-588. (2010). Finite thin disc models of four galaxies in the Ursa Ma- Zotos, E. E. and Caranicolas, N. D. (2013). Revealing the in- jor cluster: NGC 3877, NGC 3917, NGC 3949 and NGC 4010. fluence of dark matter on the nature of motion and the families of Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 404(1), 468- orbits in axisymmetric galaxy models. Astronomy & Astrophysics, 560, A110. Greiner, J. (1987). A new kind of stellar orbit in a galactic poten- Zotos, E. E. (2014). Classifying orbits in galaxy models with a tial. Cel. Mech. 40, 171. prolate or an oblate dark matter halo component. Astronomy & Hernquist, L. (1990). An analytical model for spherical galaxies Astrophysics, 563, A19. and bulges. The Astrophysical Journal, 356, 359-364. Zotos, E. E., Rian˜o-Doncel, A., and Dubeibe, F. L. (2018). Jaffe, W. (1983). A simple model for the distribution of light in Basins of convergence of equilibrium points in the generalized spherical galaxies. Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical So- H´enon-Heiles system. International Journal of Non-Linear Me- ciety, 202(4), 995-999. chanics, 99, 218-228. Lees, J. F. and Schwarzschild, M. (1992). The orbital structure of galactic halos. The Astrophysical Journal, 384, 491-501. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nonlinear Sciences arXiv (Cornell University)

Orbital dynamics in realistic galaxy models: NGC 3726, NGC 3877 and NGC 4010

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Abstract

In the present paper, using a generalization of the Miyamoto and Nagai potential we adjusted the observed rotation curves of three specific spiral galaxies to the analytical circular velocities. The observational data have been taken from a 21 cm-line synthesis imaging survey using the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope, for three particular galaxies in the Ursa Major cluster: NGC 3726, NGC 3877 and NGC 4010. Accordingly, the dynamics of the system is analyzed in terms of the Poincar´e sections method, finding that for larger values of the angular momentum of the test particle or lower values its total energy the dynamics is mainly regular, while on the opposite cases, the dynamics is mainly chaotic. Our toy model opens the possibility to find chaotic bounded orbits for stars in those particular galaxies. Key words: Stellar dynamics; Galaxies: kinematics and dynamics; Nonlinear dynamics and chaos. Din´amica orbital en modelos realistas de gal´axias: NGC 3726, NGC 3877 y NGC 4010 Resumen En el presente trabajo, utilizando una generalizacio´n del potencial de Miyamoto-Nagai, se ajustan las curvas de rotacio´n observadas de tres galaxias espirales a las velocidades circulares anal´ıticas. Los datos observacionales se tomaron de un conjunto de im´agenes de l´ınea de 21 cent´ımetros (o l´ınea HI) obtenidos con el Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT), para tres galaxias particulares en el grupo de la Ursa Major: NGC 3726, NGC 3877 y NGC 4010. Seguidamente, se analiza la din´amica del sistema en t´erminos del m´etodo de secciones de Poincar´e, encontrando que para valores grandes del momento angular de la part´ıcula de prueba o valores bajos su energ´ıa total, la din´amica es principalmente regular, mientras que en los casos opuestos, la din´amica es principalmente cao´tica. Nuestro modelo abre la posibilidad de encontrar ´orbitas cao´ticas acotadas para estrellas presentes en esas galaxias particulares. Palabras clave: Din´amica estelar, Galaxias: cinem´atica y din´amica, Din´amica no lineal y caos. Introduction analytical models which closely approximate the light distri- bution for spherical and elliptical galaxies, respectively. A few years later, Long & Murali (1992) presented an analytical Since the seminal paper by Miyamoto & Nagai (1975), the potential for barred galaxies that reduces to the Miyamoto- literature on three-dimensional analytical models for the grav- Nagai disk by an appropriate setting of the free parameters, itational field of different types of galaxies has grown consider- while Dehnen (1993) generalized the Jaffe and Hernquist mod- ably. In this respect, particular attention deserve the models els by means of a family of density profiles with different central proposed by Jaffe (1983) and Hernquist (1990), who derived Correspondencia: G. A. Gonz´alez, guillermo.gonzalez@saber.uis.edu.co, Recibido: 5 de octubre de 2018; Aceptado: 14 de febrero de arXiv:1907.09573v1 [astro-ph.GA] 22 Jul 2019 slopes. More recently, Vogt & Letelier (2005) derived an an- radial and vertical perturbations. On the other hand, the dy- alytical expression for the gravitational field of galaxies, based namics of the orbits is studied through the Poincar´e surfaces on the multipolar expansion up to the quadrupole term. Using of section, showing that the orbital motion exhibits a strong a different approach, Gonz´alez et al. (2010) obtained a family dependence on the angular momentum and energy of the test of finite thin-discs models for four galaxies in the Ursa major particles (stars). cluster in which the circular velocities were adjusted to fit the The paper is organized as follows: in the first section, we de- observed rotation curves. rive the generalized Miyamoto-Nagai model. Next, from the One advantage of an analytical galaxy model is the possibil- new potential the explicit expressions for the physical quanti- ity to study the dynamics (regular or chaotic) of orbits. This ties of interest are determined. In the second section we adjust can be considered one of the standing problems in galactic the observed rotation curves of three specific spiral galaxies dynamics because it could allow us to understand the for- (NGC 3726, NGC 3877 and NGC 4010) to the analytical circu- mation and evolution of galaxies (Contopoulos, 1979), as lar velocities derived with our model. Then, the mass-density shown by the pioneer simulations of Lindblad (1960). De- profiles are calculated, along with the vertical and epicyclic fre- spite the fact that early papers on this topic studied only regu- quencies, showing that our model not only is well-behaved but lar orbits in the meridional plane (Martinet & Mayer, 1975, also satisfy the stability conditions. A dynamical analysis in Manabe, 1979, Greiner, 1987, Lees & Schwarzschild, terms of the Poincar´e surfaces of section is performed in the 1992), soon after, the existence of chaos on the orbital mo- third section. Finally, in the fourth section, we summarize our tion started to be considered by Caranicolas (1996) and main conclusions. Caranicolas & Papadopoulos (2003). In the majority of cases all these studies focused on the distinction between Generalized Miyamoto-Nagai model regular and chaotic orbits (Manos & Athanassoula, 2011, Bountis et. al., 2012, Manos et al., 2013) or the influence of the galaxy components (nucleus, bulge, disk, halo) on the char- Let us start considering the axially symmetric Laplace’s equa- acter of orbits, see e.g. (Zotos, 2012, Zotos & Caranicolas, tion in spherical coordinates 2013, Zotos, 2014). Notwithstanding the evidence that both 1 ∂ ∂Φ 1 ∂ ∂Φ 2 2 ∇ Φ(r, θ) = r + sin θ = 0, (1) chaotic and regular motions are possible in many axisymmet- 2 2 r ∂r ∂r r sin θ ∂θ ∂θ ric potentials, recent studies on generalized axisymmetric po- whose general solution reads as tentials suggest that a third integral of motion seems to exist for energy values closer to the escape energy (Dubeibe et al., l −(l+1) Φ(r, θ) = A r − B r P (cos θ), (2) l l l 2018, Zotos et al., 2018). Hence, such apparent ambiguity l=0 might only be solved by performing systematic studies of each where A and B are constants to be determined, P are the l l l particular model. Legendre polynomials, and the notation (r, θ, φ) means (radial, In this paper, we are interested in meridional motions of polar, azimuthal) coordinates, respectively. free test particles (stars) in presence of analytical realistic Since Φ(r, θ) denotes the gravitational potential of an ax- galaxy models. Our models possess axial symmetry, which is isymmetric finite distribution of mass, the boundary condition a good approximation given the morphology of galaxies that lim Φ(r, θ) = 0 must be satisfied, thus the solution (2) r→∞ are mainly approximate figures of revolution. Additionally, the takes the form galaxy components were not added one by one, instead of this, we derived a generalized Miyamoto-Nagai model that can be B P (cos θ) l l Φ(r, θ) = − . (3) l+1 adjusted very accurately to fit the observed rotation curve and l=0 hence it is assumed that all (or most of) the components are Following Vogt & Letelier (2005), in order to obtain a gener- taken into account. The determination of the specific values alized Miyamoto-Nagai model and for the sake of simplicity, we of the coefficients of the series expansion let us calculate the shall consider terms up to l = 3 in (3), therefore, transforming corresponding surface densities and all the kinematic quantities to cylindrical coordinates (R, z) by means of the relations characterizing the particular galaxy models. Unlike the models derived by Gonz´alez et al. (2010), which exhibit instabilities 2 2 cos θ = z/r and r = R + z , (4) to small vertical perturbations (see e.g. the cases of NGC 3877 and applying the additional transformation (Satoh, 1980), and NGC 4010), our models satisfy the stability conditions for 2 2 z → z = a + z + b , (5) with a and b two arbitrary parameters, the generalized poten- square curve fitting method allows us to calculate the numer- tial takes the form ical values of the parameters for each particular galaxy. The ∗ ˜ ˜ ˜ ˜ resulting values of a˜, b, B , B , B , and B , for the three galax- 0 1 2 3 B B z 0 1 Φ(R, z) = −p − 3/2 ies under consideration, are given in Table 1. 2 2 ∗2 2 ∗ (R + z ) R + z 2 ∗2 2 ∗ ∗3 B R − 2z B 3R z − 2z 2 3 NGC 3726 NGC 3877 NGC 4010 + . (6) 5/2 7/2 2 2 2 ∗ 2 ∗ 2 (R + z ) 2 (R + z ) a˜ 0.6773 0.8491 1.143 −6 −7 −6 b −1.045 × 10 −2.929 × 10 −9.568 × 10 4 4 4 B −7.183 × 10 −9.859 × 10 −3.146 × 10 Once the potential has been specified, the mass-density distri- 0 5 5 4 bution Σ can be calculated directly from Poisson equation, B 1.342 × 10 1.820 × 10 4.735 × 10 4 5 4 B −8.337 × 10 −1.098 × 10 1.464 × 10 2 2 2 1 ∂ Φ 1 ∂Φ ∂ Φ 4 4 3 Σ = + + , (7) B 2.616 × 10 3.674 × 10 −7.815 × 10 2 2 4πG ∂R R ∂R ∂z while the circular velocity v of particles in the galactic plane, Table 1. Parameters for each particular galaxy model. the epicyclic frequency k, and the vertical frequency ν of small oscillations about the equilibrium circular orbit, can be ob- HaL HbL tained from the following expressions evaluated at z = 0 1.0 (Binney & Tremaine, 2011) 0.8 ∂Φ v = R , (8) 0.6 ∂R 0.4 ∂ Φ 3 ∂Φ k = + , (9) 2 50 ∂R R ∂R 0.2 ∂ Φ 0.0 ν = . (10) 0 0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 ∂z Ž Ž R R From (8-10), it is important to emphasize that a feasible model HcL must satisfy the constraints set by the conditions v ≥ 0, 0.10 2 2 k ≥ 0, and ν ≥ 0, where the last two inequalities are un- derstood as stability conditions (Vogt & Letelier, 2005). 0.05 0.00 As is evident from the preceding paragraphs, the galactic mod- els and its associated physical quantities are uniquely deter- - 0.05 mined by the set of constants a, b, B , B , B , and B , which 0 1 2 3 - 0.10 (taking a pragmatic approach) can be estimated from the ob- - 1.0 - 0.5 0.0 0.5 1.0 servational data of the corresponding rotation curves, as we will discuss in detail in the next section. HdL HeL 1.0 1.0 0.8 0.8 Rotation curves fitting 0.6 0.6 0.4 0.4 The observational data were taken from Verheijen & Sancisi 0.2 0.2 (2001) for three specific galaxies in the Ursa Major cluster: NGC 3726, NGC 3877 and NGC 4010. Following the procedure 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 outlined in Gonza´lez et al. (2010), we take the galaxy radius Ž Ž R R R as the given by the largest tabulated value of the data. Thus, introducing dimensionless variables R = R/R , z˜ = d Figure 1. Model fitted to the rotation curve of NGC 3726 ˜ ˜ ˜ z/R , a˜ = a/R , b = b/R and setting B = B /R , B = d d d 0 0 d 1 using the parameters given in the first column of Table 1. (a) 2 3 4 ˜ ˜ B /R , B = B /R , and B = B /R , the nonlinear least The solid curve indicates the rotation velocity calculated from 1 2 2 3 3 d d d It should be noted that setting B = GM,B = B = B = 0 in (6), we get the well-known Miyamoto-Nagai Potential 0 1 2 3 (Miyamoto & Nagai, 1975). Ž v Hkm sL Ž2 S (8) while the error bars denote the velocity dispersions of the NGC 4010. The solid lines correspond to the analytical ex- observational data. (b) Normalized mass-density distribution pressions (8) fitted to the rotation curves. As can be seen, in Σ at z = 0, calculated from (7). (c) Constant-density curves of each case the model fits the observed data with good accuracy. equation (7) in the meridional plane. (d) Epicyclic frequency Additionally, in panels (b) of Figures 1, 2, and 3, we plot the (9) evaluated on z = 0. (e) Vertical frequency (10) evaluated normalized mass-density distribution (7) at z = 0 for the three on z = 0. galaxies, as a function of the dimensionless radial coordinate R. Here, we obtain a well-behaved mass-density function, showing a maximum value at the center that decreases to zero at the HaL HbL 1.0 edge of the disk. On the other hand, in panels (c) of Figures 1, 2, and 3, we present four isodensity curves of the mass-density 0.8 distribution (7) in the meridional plane (R, z˜), showing that 0.6 100 each model corresponds to a very different mass distribution. 0.4 Finally, from panels (d) and (e) of the same figures, it is note- worthy that in the three cases the stability conditions are fully 0.2 satisfied. 0.0 0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 Ž Ž R R HaL HbL 1.0 HcL 0.10 0.8 0.05 � 0.6 0.00 0.4 0.2 - 0.05 0.0 - 0.10 0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 - 1.0 - 0.5 0.0 0.5 1.0 Ž Ž R R HcL HdL HeL 0.10 1.0 1.0 0.8 0.8 0.05 0.6 0.6 0.00 0.4 0.4 - 0.05 0.2 0.2 - 0.10 - 1.0 - 0.5 0.0 0.5 1.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 Ž Ž HdL HeL R R 1.0 1.0 Figure 2. Model fitted to the rotation curve of NGC 3877 us- 0.8 0.8 ing the parameters given in the second column of Table 1. (a) 0.6 0.6 The solid curve indicates the rotation velocity calculated from (8) while the error bars denote the velocity dispersions of the 0.4 0.4 observational data. (b) Normalized mass-density distribution 0.2 0.2 Σ at z = 0, calculated from (7). (c) Constant-density curves of equation (7) in the meridional plane. (d) Epicyclic frequency 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 (9) evaluated on z = 0. (e) Vertical frequency (10) evaluated Ž Ž R R on z = 0. Figure 3. Model fitted to the rotation curve of NGC 4010 In panels (a) of Figures 1, 2, and 3, we show the obser- using the parameters given in the third column of Table 1. (a) vational data (points) of the rotation curve with the cor- The solid curve indicates the rotation velocity calculated from responding velocity dispersions (error bars) as reported by (8) while the error bars denote the velocity dispersions of the Verheijen & Sancisi (2001) for NGC 3726, NGC 3877 and observational data. (b) Normalized mass-density distribution Ž v Hkm sL Ž2 v Hkm sL Ž 2 Ν Ž S ˜ Σ at z = 0, calculated from (7). (c) Constant-density curves of Since the Hamiltonian is autonomous, H is an integral of mo- equation (7) in the meridional plane. (d) Epicyclic frequency tion (9) evaluated on z = 0. (e) Vertical frequency (10) evaluated on z = 0. H(R, z, p , p ) = H(R , z , p , p ) = h, (19) R z 0 0 R z 0 0 with h the energy of an orbit. Stellar Dynamics The existence of an analytic integral of motion reduces the phase space dimensionality, and hence the Poincar´e surface of It is a well-known fact that using rough estimates of the dimen- section is an appropriate and well-established method to ana- sions of typical stars and galaxies, the collision interval between lyze the dynamics of the system. Taking into account the axial stars is about 10 times longer than the average age for most symmetry associated to the system, it is customary to choose galaxies (Binney & Tremaine, 2011). This implies that the the equatorial plane z = 0 as the Poincar´e plane in order to star’s motion can be determined solely by the gravitational at- ˜ ˜ represent the surface of sections in the (R, R)-plane. The orbits traction of the galaxy and that collisions between stars are so were numerically integrated forward in time for 1000 units of rare that are irrelevant (Maoz, 2016). Therefore, as a first ap- time by using a Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg Method (RKF45), with proximation, the orbital dynamics of a star in a given galaxy this setting the numerical error related to the conservation of can be studied following the usual Lagrangian and Hamiltonian −14 the energy is at most 10 . In all cases we set z = p = 0 0 R approaches for the motion of a test particle in the presence of and we scan the phase space with a large number of initial con- an estimated gravitational potential. ditions for the radii R , these three values allow us to determine the values of p through the relation (19). The orbital motion of a test particle in an axisymmetric poten- 0 tial is governed by the Lagrangian h i 2 2 2 ˙ ˙ L = R + (Rφ) + z˙ − Φ(R, z), (11) with (R, φ, z) the usual cylindrical coordinates. The general- ized canonical momenta read as ˙ ˙ p = R, p = R φ, p = z˙, (12) R φ z and the Hamiltonian takes the form 2 2 H = p + p + Φ (R, z), (13) eff R z with Φ (R, z) = + Φ(R, z). (14) eff 2R Here, L = p =constant, denotes the conserved component of angular momentum about the z-axis. From (13), the resulting Hamilton’s equations of motion can be expressed as R = p , (15) z˙ = p , (16) L ∂Φ(R, z) p˙ = − , (17) R ∂R ∂Φ(R, z) p˙ = − , (18) ∂z where Φ(R, z) is given by Eq. (6) and its respective parameters Figure 4. Poincar´e surfaces of section of NGC 3726 for differ- should be taken from Table 1. ent values of angular momentum L with h = −1. z Figure 5. Poincar´e surfaces of section of NGC 3726 for differ- Figure 7. Poincar´e surfaces of section of NGC 3877 for differ- ent values of total energy h with L = 1. ent values of total energy h with L = 1. z z Figure 6. Poincar´e surfaces of section of NGC 3877 for differ- Figure 8. Poincar´e surfaces of section of NGC 4010 for differ- ent values of angular momentum L with h = −1. ent values of angular momentum L with h = −10. z z epicyclic frequencies, showing that unlike the results presented in Gonz´alez et al. (2010) for NGC 3877 and NGC 4010, our models satisfy the stability conditions for radial and vertical perturbations. Even though the set of models presented here should be considered as a rough approximation, the circular velocities were shown to fit very accurately to the observed rotation curves and in the three cases the stability conditions were fully satisfied. Here, it is important to note that con- trary to the observed tendency in the Miyamoto-Nagay model, where the limit a → 0 reduces to the Plummer sphere, our models exhibit a tendency to an spherical mass distribution with increasing of the parameter a. On the other hand, by using the Poincar´e section method we have also studied the dynamics of the meridional orbits of stars in presence of the gravitational field of the galaxy models. From our results it may be inferred that there exists an increase in the regularity of the orbits for larger values of the angular mo- mentum, while for larger values of energy the orbits tend to be more chaotic. Our toy models suggest that in the three galaxy models chaotic orbits are possible, however the chaotic behavior is very weak for the NGC 3877 model in compari- son to NGC 3726 and NGC 4010. It should be noted that Figure 9. Poincar´e surfaces of section of NGC 4010 for differ- none of the studied models showed a fully chaotic phase space. ent values of total energy h with L = 5. Our results could have significant implications for the study of the dynamics and kinematics of these three specific galaxies, The transition from regularity to chaos (or viceversa) that takes since the regular or chaotic behaviors could shed lights into the place for the three considered galaxy models was inspected evolution and structure of these galaxies, i.e., in phase space, through the Poincar´e sections in Figs. 4-9, by using different regular orbits are trapped in the vicinity of neighbor orbits, values of L (Figs. 4, 6 and 8) and h (Figs. 5, 7 and 9). It can while chaotic orbits, by its own nature, will diverge exponen- be observed that the orbital motion exhibits a strong depen- tially in time from its neighbors by filling the phase space in dence on the angular momentum L and energy h of the test an erratic manner. particle. In particular, from the surfaces of section presented in Figs. 4, 6, and 8, we may infer that there exists an increase in the regularity of the system for larger values of the angular momentum L , i.e. if there exists a chaotic sea the increase Acknowledgments of L will fill the phase with KAM islands, while the opposite effect is observed for larger values of energy h (see Figs. 5, 7, and 9), where the KAM islands deform and shrink giving place We would like to thank the anonymous referees for their use- to larger regions of chaos. ful comments and remarks, which improved the clarity and quality of the manuscript. FLD, SMM and GAG gratefully ac- knowledges the financial support provided by COLCIENCIAS (Colombia) under Grants No. 8840 and 8863. Concluding remarks In the present paper, using the general solution to the Laplace equation, we have derived a generalized Miyamoto-Nagai po- Authors’ contributions tential. By means of the nonlinear least square fitting, the analytical velocity curves were adjusted to the observed ones of three specific spiral galaxies: NGC 3726, NGC 3877 and All authors make substantial contributions to conception, de- NGC 4010. The resulting analytical models were used to de- sign, analysis and interpretation of data. All authors partici- termine the mass-density distributions and the vertical and pate in drafting the article and reviewed the final manuscript. Conflict of interest Lindblad, P. O. (1960). Stockholm Obs. Ann. 21, No. 3-4. Long, K., Murali, C. (1992). Analytical potentials for barred galaxies. The Astrophysical Journal, 397, 44-48. 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The structure of motion in a 4- Maoz, D. (2016). Astrophysics in a Nutshell: Second Edition. component galaxy mass model. Astrophysics and Space Science, Princeton university press. 246(1), 15-28. Martinet, L. and Mayer, F. (1975). Galactic orbits and integrals Caranicolas, N. D. and Papadopoulos, N. J (2003). Chaotic of motion for stars of old galactic populations. III-Conclusions and orbits in a galaxy model with a massive nucleus. Astronomy & applications. Astronomy and Astrophysics, 44, 45-57. Astrophysics, 399(3), 957-960. Miyamoto, M. and Nagai, R. (1975). Three-dimensional mod- Contopoulos, G. (1979). Stochastic behavior in classical and quan- els for the distribution of mass in galaxies. Publications of the tum Hamiltonian systems, G. Casati and J. Ford Eds., p. 1-17. Astronomical Society of Japan, 27, 533-543. Dehnen, W. (1993). A family of potential-density pairs for spherical Satoh, C. (1980). Dynamical models of axisymmetric galaxies and galaxies and bulges. 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Exploring the nature of orbits in a galactic Gonz´alez, G. A., Plata-Plata, S. M. and Ramos-Caro J. model with a massive nucleus. New Astronomy, 17(6), 576-588. (2010). Finite thin disc models of four galaxies in the Ursa Ma- Zotos, E. E. and Caranicolas, N. D. (2013). Revealing the in- jor cluster: NGC 3877, NGC 3917, NGC 3949 and NGC 4010. fluence of dark matter on the nature of motion and the families of Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 404(1), 468- orbits in axisymmetric galaxy models. Astronomy & Astrophysics, 560, A110. Greiner, J. (1987). A new kind of stellar orbit in a galactic poten- Zotos, E. E. (2014). Classifying orbits in galaxy models with a tial. Cel. Mech. 40, 171. prolate or an oblate dark matter halo component. Astronomy & Hernquist, L. (1990). An analytical model for spherical galaxies Astrophysics, 563, A19. and bulges. The Astrophysical Journal, 356, 359-364. Zotos, E. E., Rian˜o-Doncel, A., and Dubeibe, F. L. (2018). Jaffe, W. (1983). 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Nonlinear SciencesarXiv (Cornell University)

Published: Jul 22, 2019

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