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Online Fall Detection using Recurrent Neural Networks

Online Fall Detection using Recurrent Neural Networks Mirto Musci, Daniele De Martini, Nicola Blago, Tullio Facchinetti and Marco Piastra Dept. of Electrical, Computer and Biomedical Engineering Universita ` degli Studi di Pavia, via Ferrata, 5 – 27100 Pavia, Italy mirto.musci@unipv.it, fdaniele.demartini01, nicola.blago01g@ateneopv.it, ftullio.facchinetti, marco.piastrag@unipv.it Abstract— Unintentional falls can cause severe injuries and the sensor stream, with a relatively simple architecture. The even death, especially if no immediate assistance is given. The proposed solution is compared against a baseline based on aim of Fall Detection Systems (FDSs) is to detect an occurring statistical analysis. fall. This information can be used to trigger the necessary The paper is organized as follows. Firstly Section II assistance in case of injury. This can be done by using either discusses some related works, then Section III describes in ambient-based sensors, e.g. cameras, or wearable devices. The aim of this work is to study the technical aspects of FDSs detail the proposed method, while Section IV shows the based on wearable devices and artificial intelligence techniques, experimental result achieved on a selected dataset. Finally, in particular Deep Learning (DL), to implement an effective Section V concludes the paper. algorithm for on-line fall detection. The proposed classifier is based on a Recurrent Neural Network (RNN) model with II. STATE OF THE ART underlying Long Short-Term Memory (LSTM) blocks. The method is tested on the publicly available SisFall dataset, with The analysis of the state of the art is divided into two extended annotation, and compared with the results obtained parts. The first part encompasses a list of relevant detection by the SisFall authors. techniques. In the second part, given the goal of using a I. INTRODUCTION neural network approach, available datasets are revised with the objective of selecting the most adequate one. Unintentional falls are the leading cause of fatal injury and the most common cause of nonfatal trauma-related hospital A. Detection techniques admissions among older adults. As stated in [1], more than 25% of people aged over 65 years old falls every year FDSs can be classified into two main categories: ambient- increasing to 32%–42% for those over 70. Moreover, 30%– based and based on wearable devices [3]. Ambient-based 50% of people living in long-term care institutions fall each sensors are mainly based on video cameras, either standard year, with almost half of them experiencing recurrent falls. or RGB-D [4], [5]. These techniques are intrusive in terms Falls lead to 20%–30% of mild to severe injuries and 40% of of privacy, and they adapt poorly to the case of highly all injury deaths. The average cost of a single hospitalization mobile persons who are not restricted to confined areas. for fall-related injuries in 65 years old people reached $17483 Moreover, Automatic Fall Detection (AFD) in video streams in the US in 2004, with a forecast to $240 billion of total still represents a difficult problem to address even for recent costs by 2040. DL methods, such as in [6]. Elderly people are not the only group that is heavily Wearable devices, on the other hand, offer portability as affected by unintentional falls: any person with some sort they can be used regardless of the user location. The most of fragility is part of similar statistics. Examples include widely adopted sensor to equip wearable devices is the any kind of mild disability and post-operative patients. The 3-axis accelerometer due to its low cost and tiny size. The situation is worsened when people live alone, so they may common availability of accelerometers in smartphones opens not receive immediate assistance in case of accident [2]. the possibility to use such devices as a cost-effective sensory The aim of Fall Detection Systems (FDSs) is to promptly device. Beside being widespread and economically afford- detect occurring falls in real-time and hence insuring a able, smartphones provide a robust and powerful hardware remote notification, so that timely aid can be given. Fall platform (i.e., processor, screen and radio), which allows to Detection (FD) can be a non-trivial issue, indeed, while a implement fully self-contained monitoring applications. human being can easily recognise a fall when the falling Rotational sensors (gyroscopes) are also used in some subject is in sight, it might be difficult for a machine, since works [7]. The work proves the relevance of information a fall can only be detected indirectly. provided from gyros for FD, since the authors achieve very In the light of these premises, the aim of this paper is to good results with the use of that type of measurements alone. study the technical aspects of using wearable devices for However, many commercial smartphones are not equipped FDSs and Deep Learning (DL) techniques to develop an with gyros, making this approach not viable on these devices. effective fall detection algorithm. In particular, our goal is In [8] the authors use both accelerometers and gyros targeting to be able to detect falls on-line and in real time, directly on fast response and low computational requirements. arXiv:1804.04976v1 [cs.CY] 13 Apr 2018 Dataset Ref. Number of Number of Sensing staff and each action to be performed is described in a video subjects activities device clip recorded with an instructor. DLR [16] 16 6 Smartphone tFall [11] 10 8 Smartphone In addition, most of the other listed datasets obtained the Project Gravity [9] 3 19 Smartphone data from smartphones, while SisFall adopts a dedicated MobiFall [17] 24 13 Smartphone custom measuring device that is fixed on body as a belt SisFall [10] 38 34 Custom UMAFall [18] 17 11 Custom buckle. Such device included two different models of 3D accelerometers and a gyroscope. Sensors data were sampled TABLE I: List of available datasets that have been considered at a frequency of 200 Hz. for the proposed DL approach. III. PROPOSED SOLUTION The aim of this work is to detect occurring falls with AFD from wearable sensor data is currently an open temporal precision and accuracy. The adopted method is problem, with multiple approaches in the literature. The based on ML and, in particular, on a DL approach. Therefore, common procedure is to record the raw acceleration sensor the objective requires specific provisions both in dataset readings, to filter them and then to apply a feature extraction preparation and training. method that classifies activities as falls or other activities, the so-called Activities of Daily Living (ADL). In [9], [10], the A. Dataset and Labeling occurrence of a fall is detected using a threshold technique The training of a detection system based on a dataset that relies on statistics on quantities such as the acceleration of measured values requires specific labeling that includes magnitude and its standard deviation. In [11], instead, the temporal annotations, i.e. the explicit indication of temporal FDS is considered as an anomaly detection system and the intervals associated to the relevant events of interest. For this authors draw a comparison between two different Machine purposes, we considered three classes of events: Learning (ML) techniques: K-Nearest Neighbors (KNN) and FALL: this class identifies the time interval when the Support Vector Machine (SVM). A simple feed-forward person is experiencing a state transition that leads to a Artificial Neural Network (ANN) is used in [12], which is catastrophic change of state, i.e., a fall. fed with a set of features obtained in a time window of three ALERT: the time interval in which the person is in a seconds. In cascade of that, a Finite State Machine (FSM) is dangerous state transition; this state may lead to a fall, used to discard the false positive matches. or the subject may be able to avoid the fall. In [13], the authors combine different techniques to en- BKG: the default time interval when the person is in hance the prediction of the classifier. Indeed, they investigate control of his/her own state. the use of ANN, KNN, Radial Basis Function (RBF), Prob- Since we are interested in detecting falls, the BKG class abilistic Principal Component Analysis (PPCA) and Linear is considered to absorb all the activities that are not related Discriminant Analysis (LDA). The authors of [14] utilize a to a fall (ADLs), such as walking, jumping, walking up the DL technique to detect falls. The architecture is composed by stairs, sitting on a chair, and so on. All these activities are two parts: a Convolutional Network and a Recurrent Neural included in the considered dataset. Our classification focuses Network (RNN). The former is leveraged to automatically in particular on catastrophic transitions (i.e. falls). extract features from sensor signals, while the latter defines On the other hand, we need datasets in which all data se- a temporal relationship between the samples. Finally, in [15] quences are annotated by temporal intervals that correspond a FSM-like model is used to detect the fall episodes. Such to FALL and ALERT events, while every other interval is episodes are then decomposed into features that are sent to considered as BKG by default. It is worth to outline that this a KNN classifier to distinguish between falls and ADLs. temporal labeling is not available in any datasets in Table I. B. Datasets Therefore, the existing data belonging to the SisFall dataset Since the goal of this work is to use a DL approach, was manually labeled to enable the use as a training and selecting the appropriate dataset for training and validation of validation set for the neural network. the model represents a crucial issue. The basic requirements B. Deep Learning Approach imposed on the dataset are the presence of both falls and ADLs, and the availability of detailed measurements from One of the goals of the proposed application is to run onboard sensors. For this purpose, 6 datasets were considered on top of relatively cheap and resource-constrained devices, for the application of the machine learning approach [16], such as a microprocessor-equipped smart sensor, an embed- [11], [9], [17], [10], [18]. The datasets are listed in Table I, ded platform or a smartphone. Therefore, the selection of along with the number of different subjects involved in the the DL architecture that implements the inference module, experiments, and the number of different recorded activities. i.e. the component that performs the actual detection, must For the purpose of this work, the SisFall dataset was take into account this requirement. As a result, we propose a selected since it is deemed the most complete among the relatively simple network architecture that has been adapted ones considered. In fact, it includes the largest amount of from [19]. data, both in terms of number and heterogeneity of ADL and The core of the DL architecture is depicted in Fig. 1. The subjects. Moreover, the protocol is validated by a medical network is based on two Long Short-Term Memory (LSTM) OUTPUT as the LSTM, as if it was a non-recurrent deep network. This approach entails that input data sequences in both the Layer 9 SOFTMAX training set and the live sensor readings must be arranged in windows having the same fixed size w. Fully Layer 8 As will be seen in Section IV-B, the window size w Connected 2 represents a hyperparameter which tuning is critical for the effectiveness of the whole network architecture. DROPOUT Layer 7 IV. IMPLEMENTATION AND RESULTS LSTM 2 This section briefly describes the implementation details Layer 6 of the proposed solution and shows the results obtained in comparison to the statistical classifier proposed in [10]. Layer 5 DROPOUT A. Labeling Procedure As discussed above, none of the considered datasets con- Layer 4 LSTM 1 tains the detailed temporal annotation that is required for the purpose of applying the DL classification method based on Layer 3 DROPOUT the network described in Section III-B. This fact is true for the SisFall dataset as well. As a result, further annotation Layer 2 BATCHNORM work was performed to make the dataset suitable for our purposes. The performed annotation procedure consisted in adding Fully Layer 1 Connected 1 temporal intervals to the existing data sequences in order to mark the time ranges corresponding to FALL and ALERT INPUT classes, while the remaining intervals are implicitly associ- Fig. 1: The model architecture of the proposed solution. ated to the BKG class. To simplify the classification, the White blocks are active during the training phase only and BKG class is also assigned to the immediate aftermath of are removed when doing inference on the device. The input each FALL, namely when the person is experiencing several size depends on the number of selected features (in our case secondary minor state transitions like bumping or rolling. the 3 axis of the accelerometer) and on the size w of the The labeling procedure has been carried out by the authors windows to be fed into the model. The output size depends using a software tool developed on purpose. The SisFall on the number of classes (i.e. BKG, ALERT and FALL). dataset is provided with a set of video clips describing the actions corresponding to each class of movement in the SisFall dataset. However, these video clips only describe the cells [20] connected in series (Layers 4 and 6). Each cell prototypical action performed by the instructor, not each of has a inner dimension of 32 units. The input preprocessing the actions performed by SisFall volunteers. Therefore, we is performed by the fully connected Layer 1, while a second elicited criteria of our own for temporal annotation by com- fully connected layer (Layer 8) collects the output from paring the aforementioned video clips with the corresponding sensor data recordings. the LSTM cell at Layer 6 and feeds its output to the final Figure 2 shows an example of temporally-annotated data SoftMax Layer (Layer 9) that provides the classification in sequence from SisFall. In this example the three solid lines the three classes described above. describe the readings of the 3D accelerometer for a maneuver With respect to the network structure proposed in [19], the in which a walking person falls down due to a slip. The adopted solution includes a batch normalization layer [21] initial slip is classified as an ALERT (in orange), followed (Layer 2) to regularize input data, and three dropout lay- by the FALL proper (in pale blue). As described before, the ers [22] (Layers 3, 5 and 7). The latter are used during aftermath of the FALL is ignored. network training to improve generalization, while they are The result of the described labeling procedure is openly removed in the deployed inference module. available online as an extension to the SisFall dataset. C. Training and Inference B. Software Implementation and Training The training of LSTM cells is based on the idea of The architecture described in Section III has been imple- temporal unfolding [20]. Using the temporal unfolding, the mented using the TensorFlow library [23], with the Python input is processed in sub-sequences, called windows, having programming language. All training and testing procedures predefined length w. Each LSTM cell is cascaded into were performed on a Dell 5810 workstation, equipped with exactly w copies of itself. Each copy receives the output a Nvidia Quadro K5000 GPU. of the previous cell of the cascade and the input from the window at the corresponding index. 1 https://bitbucket.org/unipv_cvmlab/ Temporal unfolding allows the training of a RNN, such sisfalltemporallyannotated/ 100 BKG ALERT FALL 32 64 128 256 512 1024 Window width Fig. 3: Accuracy of the classifier for different window widths w and a stride of 50% of w, for the three classes and using a balancing loss function. Fig. 2: Example of temporally-annotated data. The orange More formally, being N the set of all training windows, and pale blue areas indicate a ALERT and a FALL class we define B, A and F as the subsets of N belonging to respectively, while the remainder of the sequence is classified the BKG, ALERT and FALL classes, respectively. The basic as BKG by default. multiplier m for each sample i is defined as: 1 8i 2 B To train the model, all the annotated SisFall sequences m = jBj = jAj 8i 2 A (1) were divided into windows having width w and a partial jBj = jFj 8i 2 F overlapping induced by a stride of length s. In general, each and thus, denoting L the value of the standard cross- window can span over a time frame that may contain a entropy loss function computed on the i-th sample, we define set of samples belonging to different classes. To translate the weighted loss function as: the temporal (i.e. per-sample) labels described above into window labels we adopted to the following criteria: jNj each window containing at least 10% of readings la- L = m L (2) weight i i beled as FALL was tagged as FALL altogether; each non-FALL window in which the majority of sam- Figure 4b shows the confusion matrix resulting from training ples was labeled as ALERT is tagged as ALERT; with L , with a consequent drastic rise of the accuracy, weight any other window was tagged to the BKG class. above all for the ALARM class. A first problem to be addressed while training is that, for As anticipated, the window width w is a critical hyper- any reasonable choice of window width w, the three classes parameter, while the choice of the stride s is more dictated above are not equally represented in the preprocessed SisFall by practical considerations: a very low value of s entails a dataset. In other words, the number of windows labeled as substantial increase in the computational burden. The choice BKG is much larger than the number of windows labeled of the most effective values for hyperparameters w and s was as FALL or ALERT. In fact, in SisFall sequences, BKG made via a sensitivity analysis, in which window widths were sequences may last for several seconds, whereas a single varied between 32 and 1024 and stride values corresponding FALL will last for a couple of seconds at most, and in many to 25%, 50% or 75% of w were considered. cases it is as short as 500 ms. This aspect causes a strong Figure 3 shows the values of accuracy related to all the imbalance in the training dataset, in which the BKG windows three classes for each window width value and a fixed can be as much as 50 times more represented than FALLs. stride of 50%. As it can be seen, a window width of 256, Figure 4a shows the confusion matrix resulting from the corresponding to 1:28 s, and a stride of 50% resulted to be training with a standard loss function and w = 128. As the most effective in FD. it can be expected, BKG activities are classified very well, As it can be seen in the figure, the classification errors whereas FALLs are poorly detected and ALERTs are almost were drastically reduced. Finally, Fig. 4c shows the results left undetected. after an extensive grid-search optimization of every DL Our proposed solution to such unbalancing is to define hyperparameter such as number of epochs, batch size and a balancing loss function. In particular, we implemented a learning rate, using the optimal window width w = 256. weighted cross-entropy, where each sample (a window in our C. Comparison with the Baseline case) contributes to the gradient descent with a multiplier factor that depends on the inverse frequency of its class In the original paper that introduced the SisFall members in the training datasets. dataset [10], several statistical indicators were proposed for Accuracy [%] Fig. 5: Confusion matrix obtained with the C classifier with w = 256 and stride of 50%. FD. Such indicators were applied to entire sequences and (a) a classification was assigned if, at some point in time, the selected indicator was above a predefined threshold. In [10], it is shown that the so-called C and C classifiers, presented 8 9 below, were the most effective in the classification approach used in the paper. 2 k Let us denote with  (a ) the variance of the acceleration ax along the ax axis in the k-th window, where ax 2 fx; y; zg is one of the 3 axes of the 3D accelerometer. The C and C 8 9 indicators are thus defined by Eqs. (3) and (4), respectively. 2 k 2 k C :=  (a ) +  (a ) (3) x z 2 k 2 k 2 k C :=  (a ) +  (a ) +  (a ) (4) x y z (b) The difference between C and C is that the former relies 8 9 on the standard orientation of the acquisition device used in SisFall: such device was tied to the belt of the performer with the y axis along the vertical direction, pointing below, and the z axis facing the forward direction. Clearly, C is a more realistic classifier for situations in which the above assumptions do not hold, e.g. for a smartphone in a different carry position and it has been chosen as the comparison baseline. To present a meaningful comparison between our proposed classification method and the C indicator, we applied the latter to ech window of size w and we defined suitable thresholds for both ALERT and FALL classes. For the latter purpose we applied an iterative technique – (c) on the same training dataset used for DL – to derive the best Fig. 4: Confusion matrices obtained by using the baseline thresholds (in terms of accuracy) for the detection of both cross-entropy loss function (case (a)) and with the custom FALL and ALERT classes. weighted loss function (b) with w = 128. Figure (c) Figure 5 shows the confusion matrix obtained with the C shows the confusion matrix using the optimal window width classifier applied to windows of width 256 and stride 50%. w = 256 with the weighted loss function after a thorough It is clear from a simple visual inspection that the proposed hyperparameters optimization. solution significantly outperforms the C indicator. Figure 6 shows the behavior of both the baseline and our proposed DL model when compared to the manually assigned ground-truth labels in a challenging scenario. Indeed, high-dynamic activities, such as jogging, are hardly distinguishable from falls for the baseline. Our pro- [5] M. Kepski and B. Kwolek, “Fall detection using ceiling-mounted 3d depth camera,” in 2014 International Conference on Computer Vision Theory and Applications (VISAPP), vol. 2, Jan 2014, pp. 640–647. [6] P. Feng, M. Yu, S. M. Naqvi, and J. A. Chambers, “Deep learning for posture analysis in fall detection,” in 2014 19th International Conference on Digital Signal Processing, Aug 2014, pp. 12–17. [7] A. Bourke and G. Lyons, “A threshold-based fall-detection algorithm using a bi-axial gyroscope sensor,” Medical Engineering & Physics, vol. 30, no. 1, pp. 84–90, 2008. [8] Q. Li, J. Stankovic, M. Hanson, A. Barth, J. Lach, and G. Zhou, “Accurate, fast fall detection using gyroscopes and accelerometer derived posture information,” in Wearable and Implantable Body Sensor Networks, 2009, pp. 138–143. [9] T. Vilarinho, B. Farshchian, D. G. Bajer, O. H. Dahl, I. Egge, S. S. Hegdal, A. Lnes, J. N. Slettevold, and S. M. Weggersen, “A combined smartphone and smartwatch fall detection system,” in 2015 IEEE International Conference on Computer and Information Technology; Ubiquitous Computing and Communications; Dependable, Autonomic and Secure Computing; Pervasive Intelligence and Computing, Oct 2015, pp. 1443–1448. [10] A. Sucerquia, J. D. Lopez, ´ and J. F. V. Bonilla, “Sisfall: A fall and movement dataset,” in Sensors, 2017. [11] C. Medrano, R. Igual, I. Plaza, and M. Castro, “Detecting falls as novelties in acceleration patterns acquired with smartphones,” PLOS Fig. 6: Classification behavior of the C indicator (case (a)) ONE, vol. 9, no. 4, pp. 1–9, 04 2014. and the proposed DL approach (b), with respect to ground- [12] S. Abbate, M. Avvenuti, F. Bonatesta, G. Cola, P. Corsini, and A. 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Skodras, “A smartphone-based fall detection system for the elderly,” in Proceedings of the 10th International V. CONCLUSIONS Symposium on Image and Signal Processing and Analysis, Sept 2017, pp. 53–58. The purpose of the work was to apply DL techniques to [16] K. Frank, M. J. Vera Nadales, P. Robertson, and T. Pfeifer, “Bayesian the AFD problem. More specifically, RNN based on LSTM recognition of motion related activities with inertial sensors,” in blocks were used as the classifier. Proceedings of the 12th ACM International Conference Adjunct Papers After an attentive review of available datasets, the choice on Ubiquitous Computing - Adjunct, ser. UbiComp ’10 Adjunct. New York, NY, USA: ACM, 2010, pp. 445–446. fell upon the SisFall dataset, which was deemed the most [17] G. Vavoulas, M. Pediaditis, C. Chatzaki, E. Spanakis, and M. Tsik- appropriate for the task at hand. 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Online Fall Detection using Recurrent Neural Networks

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Mirto Musci, Daniele De Martini, Nicola Blago, Tullio Facchinetti and Marco Piastra Dept. of Electrical, Computer and Biomedical Engineering Universita ` degli Studi di Pavia, via Ferrata, 5 – 27100 Pavia, Italy mirto.musci@unipv.it, fdaniele.demartini01, nicola.blago01g@ateneopv.it, ftullio.facchinetti, marco.piastrag@unipv.it Abstract— Unintentional falls can cause severe injuries and the sensor stream, with a relatively simple architecture. The even death, especially if no immediate assistance is given. The proposed solution is compared against a baseline based on aim of Fall Detection Systems (FDSs) is to detect an occurring statistical analysis. fall. This information can be used to trigger the necessary The paper is organized as follows. Firstly Section II assistance in case of injury. This can be done by using either discusses some related works, then Section III describes in ambient-based sensors, e.g. cameras, or wearable devices. The aim of this work is to study the technical aspects of FDSs detail the proposed method, while Section IV shows the based on wearable devices and artificial intelligence techniques, experimental result achieved on a selected dataset. Finally, in particular Deep Learning (DL), to implement an effective Section V concludes the paper. algorithm for on-line fall detection. The proposed classifier is based on a Recurrent Neural Network (RNN) model with II. STATE OF THE ART underlying Long Short-Term Memory (LSTM) blocks. The method is tested on the publicly available SisFall dataset, with The analysis of the state of the art is divided into two extended annotation, and compared with the results obtained parts. The first part encompasses a list of relevant detection by the SisFall authors. techniques. In the second part, given the goal of using a I. INTRODUCTION neural network approach, available datasets are revised with the objective of selecting the most adequate one. Unintentional falls are the leading cause of fatal injury and the most common cause of nonfatal trauma-related hospital A. Detection techniques admissions among older adults. As stated in [1], more than 25% of people aged over 65 years old falls every year FDSs can be classified into two main categories: ambient- increasing to 32%–42% for those over 70. Moreover, 30%– based and based on wearable devices [3]. Ambient-based 50% of people living in long-term care institutions fall each sensors are mainly based on video cameras, either standard year, with almost half of them experiencing recurrent falls. or RGB-D [4], [5]. These techniques are intrusive in terms Falls lead to 20%–30% of mild to severe injuries and 40% of of privacy, and they adapt poorly to the case of highly all injury deaths. The average cost of a single hospitalization mobile persons who are not restricted to confined areas. for fall-related injuries in 65 years old people reached $17483 Moreover, Automatic Fall Detection (AFD) in video streams in the US in 2004, with a forecast to $240 billion of total still represents a difficult problem to address even for recent costs by 2040. DL methods, such as in [6]. Elderly people are not the only group that is heavily Wearable devices, on the other hand, offer portability as affected by unintentional falls: any person with some sort they can be used regardless of the user location. The most of fragility is part of similar statistics. Examples include widely adopted sensor to equip wearable devices is the any kind of mild disability and post-operative patients. The 3-axis accelerometer due to its low cost and tiny size. The situation is worsened when people live alone, so they may common availability of accelerometers in smartphones opens not receive immediate assistance in case of accident [2]. the possibility to use such devices as a cost-effective sensory The aim of Fall Detection Systems (FDSs) is to promptly device. Beside being widespread and economically afford- detect occurring falls in real-time and hence insuring a able, smartphones provide a robust and powerful hardware remote notification, so that timely aid can be given. Fall platform (i.e., processor, screen and radio), which allows to Detection (FD) can be a non-trivial issue, indeed, while a implement fully self-contained monitoring applications. human being can easily recognise a fall when the falling Rotational sensors (gyroscopes) are also used in some subject is in sight, it might be difficult for a machine, since works [7]. The work proves the relevance of information a fall can only be detected indirectly. provided from gyros for FD, since the authors achieve very In the light of these premises, the aim of this paper is to good results with the use of that type of measurements alone. study the technical aspects of using wearable devices for However, many commercial smartphones are not equipped FDSs and Deep Learning (DL) techniques to develop an with gyros, making this approach not viable on these devices. effective fall detection algorithm. In particular, our goal is In [8] the authors use both accelerometers and gyros targeting to be able to detect falls on-line and in real time, directly on fast response and low computational requirements. arXiv:1804.04976v1 [cs.CY] 13 Apr 2018 Dataset Ref. Number of Number of Sensing staff and each action to be performed is described in a video subjects activities device clip recorded with an instructor. DLR [16] 16 6 Smartphone tFall [11] 10 8 Smartphone In addition, most of the other listed datasets obtained the Project Gravity [9] 3 19 Smartphone data from smartphones, while SisFall adopts a dedicated MobiFall [17] 24 13 Smartphone custom measuring device that is fixed on body as a belt SisFall [10] 38 34 Custom UMAFall [18] 17 11 Custom buckle. Such device included two different models of 3D accelerometers and a gyroscope. Sensors data were sampled TABLE I: List of available datasets that have been considered at a frequency of 200 Hz. for the proposed DL approach. III. PROPOSED SOLUTION The aim of this work is to detect occurring falls with AFD from wearable sensor data is currently an open temporal precision and accuracy. The adopted method is problem, with multiple approaches in the literature. The based on ML and, in particular, on a DL approach. Therefore, common procedure is to record the raw acceleration sensor the objective requires specific provisions both in dataset readings, to filter them and then to apply a feature extraction preparation and training. method that classifies activities as falls or other activities, the so-called Activities of Daily Living (ADL). In [9], [10], the A. Dataset and Labeling occurrence of a fall is detected using a threshold technique The training of a detection system based on a dataset that relies on statistics on quantities such as the acceleration of measured values requires specific labeling that includes magnitude and its standard deviation. In [11], instead, the temporal annotations, i.e. the explicit indication of temporal FDS is considered as an anomaly detection system and the intervals associated to the relevant events of interest. For this authors draw a comparison between two different Machine purposes, we considered three classes of events: Learning (ML) techniques: K-Nearest Neighbors (KNN) and FALL: this class identifies the time interval when the Support Vector Machine (SVM). A simple feed-forward person is experiencing a state transition that leads to a Artificial Neural Network (ANN) is used in [12], which is catastrophic change of state, i.e., a fall. fed with a set of features obtained in a time window of three ALERT: the time interval in which the person is in a seconds. In cascade of that, a Finite State Machine (FSM) is dangerous state transition; this state may lead to a fall, used to discard the false positive matches. or the subject may be able to avoid the fall. In [13], the authors combine different techniques to en- BKG: the default time interval when the person is in hance the prediction of the classifier. Indeed, they investigate control of his/her own state. the use of ANN, KNN, Radial Basis Function (RBF), Prob- Since we are interested in detecting falls, the BKG class abilistic Principal Component Analysis (PPCA) and Linear is considered to absorb all the activities that are not related Discriminant Analysis (LDA). The authors of [14] utilize a to a fall (ADLs), such as walking, jumping, walking up the DL technique to detect falls. The architecture is composed by stairs, sitting on a chair, and so on. All these activities are two parts: a Convolutional Network and a Recurrent Neural included in the considered dataset. Our classification focuses Network (RNN). The former is leveraged to automatically in particular on catastrophic transitions (i.e. falls). extract features from sensor signals, while the latter defines On the other hand, we need datasets in which all data se- a temporal relationship between the samples. Finally, in [15] quences are annotated by temporal intervals that correspond a FSM-like model is used to detect the fall episodes. Such to FALL and ALERT events, while every other interval is episodes are then decomposed into features that are sent to considered as BKG by default. It is worth to outline that this a KNN classifier to distinguish between falls and ADLs. temporal labeling is not available in any datasets in Table I. B. Datasets Therefore, the existing data belonging to the SisFall dataset Since the goal of this work is to use a DL approach, was manually labeled to enable the use as a training and selecting the appropriate dataset for training and validation of validation set for the neural network. the model represents a crucial issue. The basic requirements B. Deep Learning Approach imposed on the dataset are the presence of both falls and ADLs, and the availability of detailed measurements from One of the goals of the proposed application is to run onboard sensors. For this purpose, 6 datasets were considered on top of relatively cheap and resource-constrained devices, for the application of the machine learning approach [16], such as a microprocessor-equipped smart sensor, an embed- [11], [9], [17], [10], [18]. The datasets are listed in Table I, ded platform or a smartphone. Therefore, the selection of along with the number of different subjects involved in the the DL architecture that implements the inference module, experiments, and the number of different recorded activities. i.e. the component that performs the actual detection, must For the purpose of this work, the SisFall dataset was take into account this requirement. As a result, we propose a selected since it is deemed the most complete among the relatively simple network architecture that has been adapted ones considered. In fact, it includes the largest amount of from [19]. data, both in terms of number and heterogeneity of ADL and The core of the DL architecture is depicted in Fig. 1. The subjects. Moreover, the protocol is validated by a medical network is based on two Long Short-Term Memory (LSTM) OUTPUT as the LSTM, as if it was a non-recurrent deep network. This approach entails that input data sequences in both the Layer 9 SOFTMAX training set and the live sensor readings must be arranged in windows having the same fixed size w. Fully Layer 8 As will be seen in Section IV-B, the window size w Connected 2 represents a hyperparameter which tuning is critical for the effectiveness of the whole network architecture. DROPOUT Layer 7 IV. IMPLEMENTATION AND RESULTS LSTM 2 This section briefly describes the implementation details Layer 6 of the proposed solution and shows the results obtained in comparison to the statistical classifier proposed in [10]. Layer 5 DROPOUT A. Labeling Procedure As discussed above, none of the considered datasets con- Layer 4 LSTM 1 tains the detailed temporal annotation that is required for the purpose of applying the DL classification method based on Layer 3 DROPOUT the network described in Section III-B. This fact is true for the SisFall dataset as well. As a result, further annotation Layer 2 BATCHNORM work was performed to make the dataset suitable for our purposes. The performed annotation procedure consisted in adding Fully Layer 1 Connected 1 temporal intervals to the existing data sequences in order to mark the time ranges corresponding to FALL and ALERT INPUT classes, while the remaining intervals are implicitly associ- Fig. 1: The model architecture of the proposed solution. ated to the BKG class. To simplify the classification, the White blocks are active during the training phase only and BKG class is also assigned to the immediate aftermath of are removed when doing inference on the device. The input each FALL, namely when the person is experiencing several size depends on the number of selected features (in our case secondary minor state transitions like bumping or rolling. the 3 axis of the accelerometer) and on the size w of the The labeling procedure has been carried out by the authors windows to be fed into the model. The output size depends using a software tool developed on purpose. The SisFall on the number of classes (i.e. BKG, ALERT and FALL). dataset is provided with a set of video clips describing the actions corresponding to each class of movement in the SisFall dataset. However, these video clips only describe the cells [20] connected in series (Layers 4 and 6). Each cell prototypical action performed by the instructor, not each of has a inner dimension of 32 units. The input preprocessing the actions performed by SisFall volunteers. Therefore, we is performed by the fully connected Layer 1, while a second elicited criteria of our own for temporal annotation by com- fully connected layer (Layer 8) collects the output from paring the aforementioned video clips with the corresponding sensor data recordings. the LSTM cell at Layer 6 and feeds its output to the final Figure 2 shows an example of temporally-annotated data SoftMax Layer (Layer 9) that provides the classification in sequence from SisFall. In this example the three solid lines the three classes described above. describe the readings of the 3D accelerometer for a maneuver With respect to the network structure proposed in [19], the in which a walking person falls down due to a slip. The adopted solution includes a batch normalization layer [21] initial slip is classified as an ALERT (in orange), followed (Layer 2) to regularize input data, and three dropout lay- by the FALL proper (in pale blue). As described before, the ers [22] (Layers 3, 5 and 7). The latter are used during aftermath of the FALL is ignored. network training to improve generalization, while they are The result of the described labeling procedure is openly removed in the deployed inference module. available online as an extension to the SisFall dataset. C. Training and Inference B. Software Implementation and Training The training of LSTM cells is based on the idea of The architecture described in Section III has been imple- temporal unfolding [20]. Using the temporal unfolding, the mented using the TensorFlow library [23], with the Python input is processed in sub-sequences, called windows, having programming language. All training and testing procedures predefined length w. Each LSTM cell is cascaded into were performed on a Dell 5810 workstation, equipped with exactly w copies of itself. Each copy receives the output a Nvidia Quadro K5000 GPU. of the previous cell of the cascade and the input from the window at the corresponding index. 1 https://bitbucket.org/unipv_cvmlab/ Temporal unfolding allows the training of a RNN, such sisfalltemporallyannotated/ 100 BKG ALERT FALL 32 64 128 256 512 1024 Window width Fig. 3: Accuracy of the classifier for different window widths w and a stride of 50% of w, for the three classes and using a balancing loss function. Fig. 2: Example of temporally-annotated data. The orange More formally, being N the set of all training windows, and pale blue areas indicate a ALERT and a FALL class we define B, A and F as the subsets of N belonging to respectively, while the remainder of the sequence is classified the BKG, ALERT and FALL classes, respectively. The basic as BKG by default. multiplier m for each sample i is defined as: 1 8i 2 B To train the model, all the annotated SisFall sequences m = jBj = jAj 8i 2 A (1) were divided into windows having width w and a partial jBj = jFj 8i 2 F overlapping induced by a stride of length s. In general, each and thus, denoting L the value of the standard cross- window can span over a time frame that may contain a entropy loss function computed on the i-th sample, we define set of samples belonging to different classes. To translate the weighted loss function as: the temporal (i.e. per-sample) labels described above into window labels we adopted to the following criteria: jNj each window containing at least 10% of readings la- L = m L (2) weight i i beled as FALL was tagged as FALL altogether; each non-FALL window in which the majority of sam- Figure 4b shows the confusion matrix resulting from training ples was labeled as ALERT is tagged as ALERT; with L , with a consequent drastic rise of the accuracy, weight any other window was tagged to the BKG class. above all for the ALARM class. A first problem to be addressed while training is that, for As anticipated, the window width w is a critical hyper- any reasonable choice of window width w, the three classes parameter, while the choice of the stride s is more dictated above are not equally represented in the preprocessed SisFall by practical considerations: a very low value of s entails a dataset. In other words, the number of windows labeled as substantial increase in the computational burden. The choice BKG is much larger than the number of windows labeled of the most effective values for hyperparameters w and s was as FALL or ALERT. In fact, in SisFall sequences, BKG made via a sensitivity analysis, in which window widths were sequences may last for several seconds, whereas a single varied between 32 and 1024 and stride values corresponding FALL will last for a couple of seconds at most, and in many to 25%, 50% or 75% of w were considered. cases it is as short as 500 ms. This aspect causes a strong Figure 3 shows the values of accuracy related to all the imbalance in the training dataset, in which the BKG windows three classes for each window width value and a fixed can be as much as 50 times more represented than FALLs. stride of 50%. As it can be seen, a window width of 256, Figure 4a shows the confusion matrix resulting from the corresponding to 1:28 s, and a stride of 50% resulted to be training with a standard loss function and w = 128. As the most effective in FD. it can be expected, BKG activities are classified very well, As it can be seen in the figure, the classification errors whereas FALLs are poorly detected and ALERTs are almost were drastically reduced. Finally, Fig. 4c shows the results left undetected. after an extensive grid-search optimization of every DL Our proposed solution to such unbalancing is to define hyperparameter such as number of epochs, batch size and a balancing loss function. In particular, we implemented a learning rate, using the optimal window width w = 256. weighted cross-entropy, where each sample (a window in our C. Comparison with the Baseline case) contributes to the gradient descent with a multiplier factor that depends on the inverse frequency of its class In the original paper that introduced the SisFall members in the training datasets. dataset [10], several statistical indicators were proposed for Accuracy [%] Fig. 5: Confusion matrix obtained with the C classifier with w = 256 and stride of 50%. FD. Such indicators were applied to entire sequences and (a) a classification was assigned if, at some point in time, the selected indicator was above a predefined threshold. In [10], it is shown that the so-called C and C classifiers, presented 8 9 below, were the most effective in the classification approach used in the paper. 2 k Let us denote with  (a ) the variance of the acceleration ax along the ax axis in the k-th window, where ax 2 fx; y; zg is one of the 3 axes of the 3D accelerometer. The C and C 8 9 indicators are thus defined by Eqs. (3) and (4), respectively. 2 k 2 k C :=  (a ) +  (a ) (3) x z 2 k 2 k 2 k C :=  (a ) +  (a ) +  (a ) (4) x y z (b) The difference between C and C is that the former relies 8 9 on the standard orientation of the acquisition device used in SisFall: such device was tied to the belt of the performer with the y axis along the vertical direction, pointing below, and the z axis facing the forward direction. Clearly, C is a more realistic classifier for situations in which the above assumptions do not hold, e.g. for a smartphone in a different carry position and it has been chosen as the comparison baseline. To present a meaningful comparison between our proposed classification method and the C indicator, we applied the latter to ech window of size w and we defined suitable thresholds for both ALERT and FALL classes. For the latter purpose we applied an iterative technique – (c) on the same training dataset used for DL – to derive the best Fig. 4: Confusion matrices obtained by using the baseline thresholds (in terms of accuracy) for the detection of both cross-entropy loss function (case (a)) and with the custom FALL and ALERT classes. weighted loss function (b) with w = 128. Figure (c) Figure 5 shows the confusion matrix obtained with the C shows the confusion matrix using the optimal window width classifier applied to windows of width 256 and stride 50%. w = 256 with the weighted loss function after a thorough It is clear from a simple visual inspection that the proposed hyperparameters optimization. solution significantly outperforms the C indicator. Figure 6 shows the behavior of both the baseline and our proposed DL model when compared to the manually assigned ground-truth labels in a challenging scenario. 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Published: Apr 13, 2018

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