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Hybrid plasmon-magnon polaritons in graphene-antiferromagnet heterostructures

Hybrid plasmon-magnon polaritons in graphene-antiferromagnet heterostructures 1 1 3 2;4 1;2 1;2 Y. V. Bludov , J. N. Gomes , G. A. Farias , J. Fernández-Rossier , M. I. Vasilevskiy , N. M. R. Peres Department of Physics, Center of Physics, and QuantaLab, University of Minho, Campus of Gualtar, 4710-057, Braga, Portugal QuantaLab,International Iberian Nanotechnology Laboratory (INL), Av. Mestre José Veiga, 4715-330 Braga, Portugal Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Caixa Postal 6030, Campus do Pici, 60455-900 Fortaleza, Ceará, Brazil and Departamento de Física Aplicada, Universidad de Alicante, Carretera de San Vicente del Raspeig 03690 San Vicente del Raspeig, Alicante, España We consider a hybrid structure formed by graphene and an insulating antiferromagnet, separated by a dielectric of thickness up to d ' 500 nm. When uncoupled, both graphene and the antiferro- magneic surface host their own polariton modes coupling the electromagnetic field with plasmons in the case of graphene, and with magnons in the case of the antiferromagnet. We show that the hy- brid structure can host two new types of hybrid polariton modes. First, a surface magnon-plasmon polariton whose dispersion is radically changed by the carrier density of the graphene layer, includ- ing a change of sign in the group velocity. Second, a surface plasmon-magnon polariton formed as a linear superposition of graphene surface plasmon and the antiferromagnetic bare magnon. This polariton has a dispersion with two branches, formed by the anticrossing between the dispersive surface plasmon and the magnon. We discuss the potential these new modes have for combining photons, magnons, and plasmons to reach new functionalities. I. INTRODUCTION The fabrication of nanostructures offers a new arena to explore hybrid systems with collective modes in the spin and charge sectors, that could result in a new type of Plasmons, excitons, phonons, and magnons are typi- polariton, mixing spin and charge collective modes. Here cal examples of collective excitations in condensed mat- we explore this possibility in a system that seems easy to ter systems. They all imply the presence of poles with fabricate with state of the art techniques. We consider frequencies in the spectrum of the response function the coupling of surface magnon polaritons of an uniax- that describes the interaction of the system with elec- ial antiferromagnet (AF) to surface plasmon polaritons tromagnetic waves. As a result, the propagation of elec- (SPPs) in graphene. tromagnetic waves with frequency ! in a material that hosts these collective modes is strongly modified, or even The antiferromagnetic resonance (AFMR) frequency in insulating unixaxial antiferromagnets, that ultimately suppressed altogether, for ! ' . This general physical phenomenon is rationalized in terms of the formation of determines the magnon-polariton frequency, occurs in the THz range, well above the typical GHz range for ferro- new collective modes known as polaritons. magnetic resonance and, importantly, within the spectral Quantum mechanically, polaritons are described as hy- range of graphene SPPs. The difference between AFMR brid collective excitations that are linear superpositions and ferromagnetic resonance arises from the fact that the of a matter collective excitation and a photon. Semi- former is determined by the interplay of exchange and classically, they are described using Maxwell equations anisotropy [1], whereas the latter is only given by mag- and constitutive relations that include the frequency de- netic anisotropy, which is much smaller in most cases. It pendent response functions. In both instances, the un- has been shown [2, 3] that uniaxial AFs, such as FeF , derlying physical phenomenon is the emergence of a new host both bulk and surface magnon polaritons (SMPs). type of wave or excitation, with properties different from These surface polaritons decay exponentially as we move those of the constituent collective mode and electromag- away from the antiferromagnet-dielectric interface. netic wave. Excitons, phonons, and plasmons, couple predomi- The formation of hybrid modes occurs when the un- nantly to the electric component of the electromagnetic coupled modes are degenerate. Therefore, the existence wave. In contrast, for magnon-polaritons, it is the mag- of an experimental knob to tune the frequency of the netic field that couples to the spins. Most of the work modes is very convenient. In the case of graphene, gat- so far has focused on polaritons that couple electromag- ing controls the carrier density, leading to a change of the netic waves with just one type of collective mode (exci- dispersion curve of SPPs. Therefore, here we consider a tons, phonons, plasmons, spin waves). Interestingly, the graphene sheet at a distance d from the surface of an in- same electromagnetic field would couple both to the spin sulating AF, as shown in Fig. 1. Since both graphene and charge sector in a system that hosts both spin and and the insulating AF host their own polariton modes, charge collective modes. The electromagnetic field of po- here we explore whether this hybrid artificial material laritons would thus provide a coupling channel between system hosts a new type of hybrid polariton that couples excitations that are normally un-coupled. graphene surface plasmons and AF magnons at the same arXiv:1902.00708v1 [cond-mat.mes-hall] 2 Feb 2019 2 romagnet. Thus, we consider the semi-infinite AF, oc- cupying the half-space z < 0. The other half-space z > 0 is supposed to be occupied by the vacuum with the graphene monolayer, arranged at plane z = d paral- lel to the AF surface (see Fig. 1). The semi-infinite uniaxial antiferromagnet, such as FeF or MnF [2, 3], is described by the permeablilty ten- 2 2 sor 2 3 0 i a b 4 5 ^ (!) = 0 1 0 : (1) i 0 b a The off-diagonal component  is finite in the presence of an external magnetic field H , that permits to tune the antiferromagnetic resonance frequency. In addition, application of the latter provides tunability of the reso- nance. In this work we only consider the case H = 0, so that  = 0 and [1]: (!) = 1 + ; (2) 2 2 Here, =  2H H + H is the antiferromag- 0 0 a e Figure 1. Schematic drawing of the system considered in this netic resonance frequency, that, unlike the case of uniax- work: a graphene sheet is located at a distance d from the ial ferromagnets, depends not only on the anisotropy field surface of an antiferromagnet, characterized by a magnetic permeability tensor (!). H , but as well on the exchange field H , which makes a e much larger than the usual ferromagnetic resonance frequencies. time. The gyromagnetic ratio is given by = e=(2m) where e and m are the charge and mass of free electron, corre- In this work we show that indeed the tunability of the electromagnetic properties of an antiferromagnetic insu- spondingly. The so called saturation frequency is given by =  2H M , where M denotes the saturation lator can be achieved by gating a graphene sheet (see s 0 a s s magnetization of each sublattice. Fig. 1). In particular, we find a smooth transition from A calculation of the permeability tensor for this sys- the conventional regime where the system has the en- tem was performed long ago [1, 5–8]. Equation (2) can ergy propagation oriented along the same direction of the be obtained from a microscopic model Hamiltonian for SMP’s wave vector to a regime where the energy flux is spins, using both the spin wave approximation and Kubo opposite to the wavevector, i.e. the group velocity of the formula for linear response to a transverse ac field of fre- hybrid excitation is negative. If the dielectric layer be- quency ! and zero wavevector. Expression (2) is real, tween graphene and the antiferromagnet has a negative electric permittivity, as it happens in a polar crystal near ignoring thereby losses. These could be included by re- placing ! by ! + i, where describes a scattering rate. optical phonon resonances, a metamaterial [4] with both negative  and  can be achieved, thus exhibiting nega- The spectral range for which  (!) < 0 plays a very special role, as it becomes evident below. The condition tive refraction. Such a tunable system allows to control the direction of energy flow at the surface of the anti-  (!) < 0 is met for < ! < + 2 a 0 0 s ferromagnet, thus providing a mechanism for directional propagation of the electromagnetic energy, without the B. Maxwell equations and boundary conditions need of an external magnetic field. The electromagnetic waves in such a layered structure are governed by macroscopic Maxwell equations, II. PROBLEM STATEMENT AND MAIN EQUATIONS @D (2D) rotH = + J  (z d) (3) A. Antiferromagnetic permeability @t @B rotE = (4) The main objective of this paper is to investigate how @t the presence of graphene in the vicinity of an antiferro- (2D) divD =   (z d) (5) magnet influences the spectrum of SMPs, and vice versa, divB = 0; (6) how the SPPs in graphene are affected by the antifer- 3 where delta-functions in Eqs.(3) and (5) describe the two- C. In plane propagation perpendicular to the (2D) (2D) staggered magnetization dimensional nature of charges  and current J in the graphene monolayer. Maxwell equations (3)–(6) can be solved separately in We consider first the case where the electromagnetic three spatial domains z < 0, 0 < z < d and z > d, which wave propagates in the direction x, perpendicular to the direction of magnetization. This means that the problem further in the paper will be denoted by j = 1; 2 and 3, correspondingly. In the framework of this formalism, the under consideration is uniform in the direction y (i.e. @=@y  0), and Maxwell equations (7)-(10) can be de- Maxwell equations have the form: composed into two independent subsystems, which cor- respond to TE and TM polarizations. The TE-polarized (j) (j) wave includes the y-component of the electric field E as @D (j) (j) rotH = ; (7) well as x- and z-components of the magnetic field H , @t i.e. (j) @B (j) rotE = ; (8) @t (j) divD = 0; (9) (j) (j) E (x; z; t) = u E (x; z; t); (19) (j) divB = 0; (10) (j) (j) (j) H (x; z; t) = u H (x; z; t) + u H (x; z; t): (20) x z x z and media indices are added as superscripts to the elec- Here u and u are unit vectors in directions x and y, x y (j) (j) (j) (j) tric and magnetic fields E , H D , B . It is no- respectively. The second subsystem, describing the TM- table that charges and currents induced in graphene do polarized wave, possesses x- and z-components of the not enter explicitly Eqs. (7). These quantities are present electric field and y-component of the magnetic field, in boundary conditions, which couples the electromag- netic fields in media j = 2 and j = 3. The boundary (j) (j) H (x; z; t) = u H (x; z; t); (21) conditions at graphene plane take the explicit form: (j) (j) (j) E (x; z; t) = u E (x; z; t) + u E (x; z; t): (22) x z x z (3) (2) u  E E = 0; (11) z=d Moreover, one can assume the temporal and spatial de- (3) (2) (2D) pendencies of the electromagnetic fields as those of a u  H H = J ; (12) z=d plane wave with frequency !, travelling along the x-axis (j) (3) (2) (2D) with wave-number k, that is, we can write E (x; z; t) = D D  u =  ; (13) z=d (j) (j) (j) E (z) exp(ikx i!t), H (x; z; t) = H (z) exp(ikx (3) (2) (j) B B  u = 0: (14) i!t). In this formalism the wave amplitudes E and z=d (j) H depend upon z-coordinate only. We now take into account the constitutive relations: Here u is a unit vector in the direction z, ”” and ”” mean vector and scalar products, respectively. The (j) (j) D = " E exp(ikx i!t); (23) antiferromagnet is insulating, and therefore has no free 0 (1) (1) charges and currents. In addition, we are assuming there B =   ^H exp(ikx i!t); (24) is no surface magnetization. As a result, the boundary (j6=1) (j6=1) B =  H exp(ikx i!t): (25) conditions between media j = 1 and j = 2, at the surface 0 of the antiferromagnet, can be written as: Such form of the constitutive relations describes the fact that the dielectric permittivities of all three media are (2) (1) u  E E = 0; (15) equal to vacuum permittivity " , and the magnetic per- z=0 0 meability tensor of antiferromagnetic medium (j = 1) is (2) (1) u  H H = 0; (16) z=0 equal to  . (2) (1) Under all these assumptions, Maxwell equations (7) for D D  u = 0; (17) z=0 the TE-polarization take the form (2) (1) B B  u = 0: (18) z=0 (j) dH (j) (j) ikH = i!" E ; (26) z 0 y dz (j) dE (j) In the following we look for the equations describing = i! [ (!)  + (1  )] H ; (27) 0 a j;1 j;1 dz electromagnetic waves with the propagation vector k ly- (j) (j) ikE = i! [ (!)  + (1  )] H (28) y 0 a j;1 j;1 z ing in-plane. There are two cases, k parallel and perpen- dicular to the AF’s staggered magnetization M , that we take along y (see Fig. 1). where  is the Kronecker delta. Correspondingly, the j;1 4 Maxwell equations for the TM-polarization read: Surface polariton type System Pol. Wavevector Magnon AF TE k M = 0 (j) dE (j) (j) Plasmon G TM isotropic ikE = i! H ; (29) z y dz Magnon-plasmon AF+G TE k M = 0 (j) dH (j) Plasmon-magnon AF+G TM k M = 0 = i!" E ; (30) dz (j) (j) Table I. Summary of the different surface polariton excitations ikH = i!" E ; (31) y z discussed in this work. The type of the polariton indicates the elementary excitation coupled to the EM field, except for the It is crucial that Eqs. (26)–(28) for the TE-polarization third line where plasmons are not directly involved in the involve only the  =  components of the magnetic xx zz hybrid wave. permeability tensor  ^ (!) [see Eq. (1)]. As a consequence, the magnetic medium is effectively isotropic with respect to the TE-polarized wave, when electromagnetic wave of the magnetic permeability tensor (1), is effectively propagates along x-direction (perpendicular to the stag- anisotropic with respect to the TE-polarized waves [see gered magnetization). At the same time, only yy compo- Eqs. (32)]. Furthermore, the AF medium influences the nent of the magnetic permeability tensor  ^ (!) is present properties of the TM-polarized waves [see Eq. (35)]. in the Maxwell equations for the TM-polarized wave (29), which is equal to unity [see Eq. (1)]. Therefore, we would expect that the AF medium in the structure depicted in III. UNCOUPLED MODES: SURFACE Fig. 1 would not exert any influence on the spectrum of PLASMON-POLARITONS AND SURFACE the TM-polarized wave. As we will see this is not exactly MAGNON-POLARITONS the case near the resonance frequency In this section we briefly revisit the properties of the SPPs in graphene, on one side, and the SMPs in the AF in D. In plane propagation parallel to the staggered the other, ignoring their mutual coupling. This provides magnetization a background to understand the nature of the new hybrid collective modes that arise in the combined graphene/AF We now consider the propagation along the y direction, structure. We keep the discussion at a qualitative level. parallel to the staggered magnetization. In this case the The quantitative theory presented in the next sections homogeneity of the system under consideration in the includes, as limiting cases, a theoretical description of direction x (@=@x  0) also implies the separation of these excitations. Maxwell equations (7)-(10) into the TE subsystem: (j) dH A. Magnon–polaritons (j) (j) ikH = i!" E ; (32) z x dz (j) The case of bulk magnon-polaritons for a uniaxial an- dE (j) = i! H ; (33) tiferromagnet was studied by [2]. It was found that only dz TE modes exist, with a dispersion relation that we derive (j) (j) ikE = i! [ (!)  + (1  )] H (34) 0 a j;1 j;1 x z in the appendix A and is depicted in Fig.2 by dashed red lines. The magnon–polariton dispersion is mathemati- and the TM subsystem: cally identical to the case of Hopfield exciton–polaritons in a semiconductor. Magnon–polaritons come in two (j) dE branches [acoustical ! (k) and optical ! (k)], both twice (j) a o ikE = (35) degenerate on account of the dimension of the symme- dz (j) try plane perpendicular to the easy axis. At frequen- = i! [ (!)  + (1  )] H ; (36) 0 a j;1 j;1 cies far from the AFMR resonance, ! 7 these two (j) dH x branches are close to the photon dispersion curve ! = ck, (j) = i!" E ; (37) dz while in the frequency range ! . the lowest, acoustic (j) (j) branch asymptotically approaches the AFRM frequency ikH = i!" E : (38) x z as k ! 1, i.e. ! (1) = . In the vicinity of the AFMR a 0 While obtaining these equation, we used the frequency two modes are separated by the frequency gap, plane-wave spatio-temporal dependence of the field whose value is roughly given by ! (0)! (1) o a 0 (j) (j) (j) E (y; z; t) = E (z) exp(iky i!t), H (y; z; t) = At the surface of AF, the collective excitations of (j) H (z) exp(iky i!t), as well as the constitutive rela- spins, i.e. magnons can be coupled to an electomag- tions, similar to Eqs. (23) (except the dependence upon netic wave, forming surface magnon-polaritons (SMP). y-coordinate instead of x). As a result, the antiferro- The key property of SMPs [see the first line of Table I] is magnet, whose response involves components yy and zz that they are TE-polarized waves and it was first consid- 5 since they are characterized by both a longer lifetime and a higher degree of field confinement [10, 11]. If graphene layer is deposited on a polar substrate, the electromag- netic field of graphene SPPs can interact with optical phonons in the substrate, thus forming hybrid modes called surface plasmon-phonon-polaritons [12–16]. Here, we also expect hybrid polaritons invloving two physically distinct elementary excitations in the materials involved. This mode will be called surface plasmon-magnon po- lariton (SPMP) and its properties are summarized in the forth line of Table I. The study of this mode will be considered in detail in Sec. V. However, the system considered in the present work is different from sur- face plasmon-phonon-polaritons in one important aspect. The two materials combined in our system, if taken sep- arately, support surface waves whose polarizations are orthogonal to each other. From Table I, it is apparent that graphene SPPs are TM modes whereas AF’s surface magnon–polaritons are TE modes. Therefore, in order to study the polaritons of the hybrid system, we need to consider both TM and Figure 2. Schematic dispersion relation of surface (blue solid TE modes. line) and bulk (red dashed lines) magnon-polaritons in the system without graphene, E = 0, and with the AF param- eters = 0:5 . The black dashed line corresponds to the s 0 IV. SURFACE MAGNON-PLASMON vacuum light line ! = kc, while frequencies 0 s 2 2 POLARITONS and + 2 are depicted by horizontal dash-and-dotted black lines (from bottom to top, respectively). A. General equations for TE modes ered by Camley e Mills [2] (see also Ref. [9]). One of the In this Section we shall demonstrate that interaction first reported [3] observations of SMPs was in the anti- between magnons and free charges in graphene via elec- ferromagnet FeF using the technique of attenuated total tromagnetic radiation modifies the spectrum of SMP. reflection. The same method first used to observe SPPs Boundary condition on graphene (12) couples the in- in metallic-dielectric interfaces. These surface magnon– plane components of the electric and magnetic fields; polaritons [depicted by blue solid line in Fig. 2] only exist in the case opf TE modes it involves transverse plas- for ck > , as we show below [see subsection IV B]. mons in graphene. For such plasmons, the current is In Sec. IV we study how the interaction between elec- perpendicular to the wavevector, the charge density is tromagnetic field of SMP at vacuum/AF interface and kept constant[17] and they do not interact with the elec- forced charge-carrier oscillations in graphene modify the tromagnetic radiation directly. However, in the hybrid SMP spectrum. The resulting hybrid mode will be re- structure considered here they can interact indirectly, ferred to as surface magnon-plasmon polariton and its through the AF whose magnons do couple to the TE- fundamental properties are summarized in the third line polarized radiation. Such hybrid evanescent waves will of Table I. be called surface magnon–plasmon–polaritons (SMPP). They propagate along the direction perpendicular to the staggered magnetization in the antiferromagnet. B. Graphene surface plasmon-polaritons It should be noticed that the frequency range of the an- tiferromagnetic resonance lies in the THz spectral region, Graphene SPPs can be understood as solutions of the where interband transitions in graphene play no role. Maxwell equations that describe an electromagnetic wave Therefore, we consider the optical response of graphene propagating along a conductive graphene sheet. The elec- described by a Drude formula without losses:[18] tromagnetic field is strongly confined in the neighbour- hood of the graphene, with evanescent off-plane tails. 2e E (!) = i ; (39) Graphene SPPs are TM-polarized and their dispersion h ~! curve, !(k) < ck, can be tuned by controlling the carrier density. Fundamental properties of SPPs in graphene are with E being the Fermi energy of doped graphene. This briefly summarized in the second line of Table I. equation is valid as long as the Fermi energy is much Compared to the SPPs at the surface of noble met- larger than k T (k is the Boltzmann constant and T B B als, the graphene polaritons have significant advantages the temperature). 6 The propagation of TE-polarized waves is governed by of these two modes. In terms of hyperbolic functions and the Maxwell equations in the form (26)–(28). Substitu- amplitudes of electric field at boundaries z = 0 and z = d, tion of Eqs. (27) and (28) into Eq. (26) results into the this solution can be represented as Helmholtz equation, (2) (2) (2) E (z) = E (0)F (d z ) + E (d)F (z ); (49) S 2 2 S 2 y y y (2) (2) (j) 2 H (z) =  E (0)F (d z ) (50) x C 2 2 x y d E 2 (j) + k E i dz (2) E (d)F (z ) ; (51) C 2 (j) h i = [ (!)  + (1  )] E ; (40) a j;1 j;1 2 (2) (2) (2) H (z) =  E (0)F (d z ) + E (d)F (z ) ; z z y S 2 2 y S 2 (52) whose solution in semi-infinite media j = 1 and j = 3 can be expressed as where we have defined (1) (1) (1) E (z) = E (0) exp( z); (41) y y sinh(z ) cosh(z ) 2 2 h i F (z )  ; F (z )  ; (53) S 2 C 2 (3) (3) (2) sinh(d ) sinh(d ) E (z) = E (d) exp (z d) ; (42) 2 2 y y (2) ;  = : (54) (1) (3) x z with E (0) and E (d) being the values of electric field i! ! y y 0 0 at the surface of the antiferromagnet and graphene, re- For the particular case of TE-polarized wave (and spectively, and plane wave temporal and spatial dependencies, men- (1) 2 2 2 tioned above), first and second relations in the boundary = k !  (!) =c ; (43) conditions (11) and (16) are expressed as (2) 2 2 2 = k ! =c : (44) In the considered framework we assume, for simplicity, (3) (2) E (d) = E (d) ; (55) y y that both the antiferromagnet and graphene are lossless (3) (2) (2) H (d) H (d) = (!)E (d) ; (56) media, which means that both the in-plane wavevector k x x y and frequency ! have real and positive values. Moreover, (2) (1) E (0) = E (0) ; (57) y y (1) since we are interested in studying the surface wave, (2) (1) (2) H (0) H (0) = 0: (58) and are also real and characterize the inverse pen- x x etration length of the evanescent fields. The respective It should be pointed out that boundary condition (56) signs of the exponents in Eqs. (41) and (42) were chosen was obtained by using the two-dimensional current in to satisfy the boundary conditions at z = 1 [namely, (2D) (1) (3) graphene J expressed via the graphene conductivity E (1) = E (1) = 0], which describe the absence y y and electric field as of modes, growing exponentially towards jzj ! 1. (2D) (2) The respective magnetic fields in media j = 1 and J = u  (!) E (d) exp (ikx i!t) : (59) y y j = 3 can be obtained by substituting Eqs. (41) and (42) into Eqs. (27) and (28), and expressing the fields as Substitution of Eqs. (45) and (51) into boundary condi- tions (56) results into the homogeneous linear system of equations: (1) (1) (1) z ! ! ! (2) H (z) = E (0) e ; (45) x y (2) i!  (!) 0 a 11 E (d) 0 sinh(d ) y = ; (60) (2) (2) (1) (1) z E (0) 0 1 M y sinh(d ) H (z) = E (0) e ; (46) 2 z y !  (!) 0 a where (2) (3) (3) (z d ) 2 2 H (z) = E (d) e ; (47) x y (2) i! (2) M  + i!  (!) ; (61) 11 0 tanh(d ) (3) (3) (z d ) 2 2 H (z) = E (d) e ; (48) z y (2) (1) M  + : (62) tanh(d )  (!) 2 a (j) where we have adopted the notation z  z, d j j (j) d with j = 1; 2. Non trivial solutions of Eq. (60) occur when the deter- For the spacer layer j = 2 that separates graphene and minant of the matrix vanishes: the AF’s surface, 0 < z < d, there are no restrictions on (2) the presence of exponentially growing or decaying modes. M M = 0 (63) 11 22 As a result, the solution is composed as the superposition sinh(d ) 2 7 For a given value of k, this equation can be satisfied by Expectedly, the SMP’s spectrum appears in the gap several values of ! (k) that define the different polariton between two branches of the TM-polarized bulk magnon- modes in the system, which are distinguished by the in- polariton dispersion relation, dex . In the following we discuss these polariton modes (1) = 0; (68) in two cases. First, we take the d ! 1 limit, where there is no coupling between graphene and the AF’s sur- which is depicted in Fig. 2 by red dashed lines (see Ap- face. This permits to recover an expression for the surface pendix A). magnon-polariton [2]. Later we shall also take the limit (2) where d is small, for which the presence of graphene modifies the SMP properties. (2) C. Dressing: the finite d < 1 case We now discuss the influence of graphene on the prop- B. No dressing: the d ! 1 limit erties of the SMP. This happens when the distance be- (2) tween antiferromagnet and graphene is such that d is In the case of infinite distance d ! 1 between the an- not very large and the Fermi energy in graphene is not tiferromagnet surface and graphene monolayer, the dis- at the Dirac point, E 6= 0. In this case the spectrum persion relation (63) transforms into of SMPs is strongly modified owing to the influence of h i (1) free charges in graphene on the electromagnetic field of (2) (2) 2 i!  (!) + = 0: (64) the SMP, supported by the surface of the AF. The SMP (!) spectrum (63) for relatively small distance d = 500 nm is depicted in Fig. 3(a) for different values of the Fermi en- The term in the first braces of Eq. (64) is always positive ergy. Thus, for finite doping of the graphene, the dressed owing to the positiveness of the imaginary part of Drude SMP spectrum has a starting-point with the frequency conductivity (39)[19], while setting equal to zero the sec- ! > , lying on the light line. An increase of the Fermi ond term in braces in (64) yields the dispersion relation energy E results into the shift of the starting-point of of the SMP existing at single interface between vacuum the spectrum towards higher frequencies. An expression and antiferromagnet[7]. for the starting-point frequency (1) (2) Since both and , defined in Eqs.(43), are positive, Eq.(64) only has solutions when  (!) < 0, a 2 2 2 a 2b 2 0 s 0 i.e. in the aforementioned frequency range 0 ! = p i 2 (a b) 2 2 + 2 . The simultaneous positiveness of the ar- 0 s (1) (2) # p 1=2 guments of and in that range takes place when 4 2 2 2 2 a + 8ab (2 0 s s 0 k  !=c, i.e., at the right of the "light line" ! = ck (which + > ; (69) 2 (a b) is depicted in Fig. 2 by black dashed line). SMP’s disper- sion relation (64) after some algebra can be expressed in can be obtained explicitly from the dispersion relation the explicit form (2) (63) by putting the condition = 0. In Eq. (69) 2 2 a = [1 + 4 E d=(~c)] , b = 8 [ E =(~ )] , and = F F s 2 0 2 2 ! = + + c k e =(4" ~c) is the fine-structure constant. It is apparent that results are independent of the sign of E , i.e., for s F 1=2 (65) graphene with extra electrons or holes. 2 2 2 2 2 c k + ) ; In the k ! 1 limit, the spectrum tends to ! = s 0 s . Therefore, as E is ramped up and the 0 s spectrum is pushed up in frequency at the smallest al- which is depicted in Fig. 2 by solid blue line. The SMP’s lowed values of k, so that the starting SMPP’s fre- spectrum starts on the light line at frequency ! = quency becomes larger than that limiting frequency (! > and wavevector k = =c. In the vicinity of this point, 0 2 ), their group velocity v = d!=dk has to the dispersion relation is described approximately by the be negative. This happens at experimentally attain- relation able dopings of the graphene. For E = 0:01 eV and 2 E = 0:03 eV, orange and green lines in Fig. 3(c), respec- + (ck ) : (66) 0 0 tively, v < 0 in a range of high values of k. For higher 2 g + 2 0 s values of E [ E = 0:4 eV, red line in Fig. 3(c)] v < 0 F F g for all values of k. At large wavevectors, k ! 1, the SMP’s spectrum 2 2 This result is distinct from the zero Fermi energy case, asymptotically approaches the frequency ! = 0 s where SMPP’s group velocity [slope of the dispersion as curve, !(k), depicted by solid blue line in Fig. 3(a)] is positive in all range of frequencies and wavevectors. It is 1 : (67) s 0 2 2 possible to see, that the group velocity is much smaller 4c k 8 V. SURFACE PLASMON-MAGNON POLARITONS A. Equations for TM modes We now consider the case of TM-polarization, for which the graphene layer is able to sustain SPPs, os- cillations of charge-carrier density in graphene coupled to the electromagnetic radiation[21, 22]. We anticipate our main finding: in the AF-graphene coupled structure, the graphene SPP is hybridized with the AF magnon, resulting in a polariton spectrum with 2 branches, that reflects the emergence of a hybrid collective mode that combines graphene plasmons with AF magnons. We shall call these hybrid excitations surface plasmon–magnon– polaritons (SPMPs). We address the case where the electromagnetic field is TM polarized and wave propagates along the y-axis, i.e. parallel to the staggerred magnetization. In this situa- tion the electromagnetic field is defined by the Maxwell equations in the form of Eqs. (35). Their solutions in the AF region can be expressed as Figure 3. (a) Surface magnon–plasmon–polariton (SMPP) !" (1) (1) H (z) = i E (0) exp(z ); (70) x y spectrum in the AF/graphene structure for Fermi energy val- (1) ues E = 0 (solid blue line), 0:01 eV (solid orange line), (1) (1) E (z) = E (0) exp(z ); (71) 0:03 eV (solid green line), and 0:4 eV (solid red line). Black y y dashed line stands for the light line in vacuum, ! = ck; (b) (1) (1) E (z) = i E (0) exp(z ); (72) Spatial distributions of the SMPP electric field for the modes 1 z y (1) with ck= = 1:46 and 0:01 eV (orange line A), 0:03 eV (green line B), and 0:4 eV (red line C). These modes are indicated The solutions in the spacer region j = 2 can be written in panel (a) by the respective letters A, B and C. The re- up as: gion occupied by the antiferromagnet is shadowed in panel (b) and the position of graphene is shown by vertical bold h i i!" (2) (2) (2) black solid line; (c) Group velocity, v = d!=dk (in dimen- g H (z) = E (0)F (d z ) E (d)F (z ) ; C 2 2 C 2 x y y (2) sionless units v =c) of the SMPP modes with E = 0:01 eV g F (73) (orange line), 0:03 eV (green line), and 0:4 eV (red line). In all panels the fields and magnetization of the antiferromagnet (2) (2) (2) E (z) = E (0)F (d z ) + E (d)F (z ); (74) S 2 2 S 2 y y y are  H = 0:787 T,  H = 55:3 T, and  M = 0:756 T, 0 a 0 e 0 s h i ik for the antiferromagnet MnF [20]. The spacer between the (2) (2) (2) E (z) = E (0)F (d z ) E (d)F (z ) : C 2 2 C 2 z y y (2) antiferromagnet and graphene has thickness d = 500 nm. The magnitude of the fields was chosen arbitrarily for convenient (75) visualization of their profiles. Finally, the solutions in the j = 3 region, above graphene, read: !" (3) (3) (z d ) 2 2 H (z) = i E (d)e ; (76) x x (2) than the speed of light in vacuum, c. Even more, in (3) (3) (z d ) 2 2 short-wavelength limit ck= & 30 the group velocity is 0 E (z) = E (d) e ; (77) y y less than 10 c, i.e. SMPPs are slow waves. (3) (3) (z d ) 2 2 E (z) = i E (d) e : (78) z y (2) Examples of spatial profiles of SMPP modes are shown (1) (2) in Fig. 3(b). As can be seen from the figure, in the Here and are defined in Eqs. (43). case of TE-polarized wave E (0) > E (d), so the field y y Using the same boundary condition equations as those is mainly concentrated nearby of the antiferromagnet in Eqs. (55)-(58) adapted for the TM polarization we ob- surface. From the comparison of lines A, B, and C in tain the linear homogeneous system of equations in the Fig. 3(b) it is possible to conclude that higher graphene form ! ! ! doping level leads to a stronger localization of the elec- (2) (2) E (d) 0 sinh(d ) tromagnetic field in the vicinity of the antiferromagnet = ; (79) (2) M 0 E (0) surface. 21 (2) y sinh(d ) 2 9 where 1 1 M = + ; (80) (2) (1) tanh(d ) 1 1  (!) M = + : (81) (2) (2) tanh(d ) i!" 2 0 Consequently, the dispersion relation can be repre- sented as M M = 0 : (82) 21 12 (2) sinh (d ) B. Undressed SPP: the d ! 1 limit For infinite separation d ! 1 between the graphene monolayer and the antiferromagnet the dispersion rela- tion becomes: 2  (!) 1 1 + = 0: (83) (2) (2) (1) i!" Setting equal to zero the first term in brackets in Eq. (83) yields the dispersion relation of the SPPs in a free– standing graphene monolayer, Figure 4. (a,b) Dispersion relations of TM-polarized SPMP in the graphene-antiferromagnet structure with E = 0:03 eV ! 2i! (2) = k = : (84) [solid blue lines in panel (a)], E = 0:1 eV [solid orange lines c (!) in panel (b)], and E = 0:3 eV [solid green lines in panel (b)]. For comparison, the SPP dispersion relation in bare This dispersion curve is shown in Fig.4(a) for E = 0:03 graphene layer (with E = 0:03 eV) is shown in panel (a) by eV by solid pink line (this small Fermi energy is chosen for solid pink line and the dashed black line corresponds to the clarity of the figure). At low frequencies the dispersion bare photon, ! = ck, while the horizontal dash-and-dotted relation (84) can be expressed as line corresponds to the AFMR frequency, ! = . (c) Spatial profiles of the electric fields, corresponding to SPMP modes with E = 0:03 eV and ck= = 1:18 (green line A and orange F 0 ! = ck (ck) : (85) 2 2 8 E line C) and ck= = 2:0 (blue line B and black line D). AF region is shadowed and graphene is at z = 0. The field pro- As a consequence, the dispersion curve (85) appears files are normalized to have the same magnitude on graphene. slightly below the light line. (d) Group velocity v = d!=dk (in dimensionless units v =c) g g of the SPMP low-frequency [! (k), solid lines] and high- The second term in brackets in Eq. (83) is always pos- frequency [! (k), dashed lines] modes with E = 0:03 eV + F itive, so that it does not provide additional modes. This (blue lines), E = 0:1 eV (orange lines), and E = 0:4 eV F F situation, however changes when d is finite. (green lines). Other parameters of the structure are the same as those in Fig. 3. C. SPP dressed by the antiferromagnet point of the spectrum at AFMR frequency, i.e. ! (k ) = + + We now consider the effect of a finite value of d in [point C in Fig 4(a)]. Eq. (82). We plot the spectrum of this hybrid modes – The strong enhancement of the density of states of the SPMPs [solid blue lines in Fig. 4]. We find that it consists SPP at the bare (non-polaritonic) AFMR frequency is a of two branches ! (k) and ! (k) with an anti-crossing distinctive feature of the SPMPs, which are hybrid mode between them [see inset in Fig. 4], which takes place formed by the SPPs and the bare magnons. The magni- in the vicinity of the AFMR frequency, ! = . Away tude of the SPMP mode is quantified by: from the AFMR frequency ! 7 , both modes follow the dispersion of the graphene SPP [like points A and D in Fig 4(a)]. In the vicinity of the antiferromagnetic 1. Absence of the energy gap between two branches, resonance the lower mode approaches asymptotically the since ! = is both the maximum energy of the AFMR frequency as k ! 1 [alike point B in Fig 4(a), lower branch, and the minimum point of the upper i.e., ! (1) = ], and the other one has the starting branch; 0 10 2. Presence of the infinite gap in momentum space at 1. They are a mixture of spin excitations (magnon), AFMR frequency = ! (k ) = ! (1). This charged excitations (plasmon) and electromagnetic 0 + + can be inferred by group velocities of upper and field (photon). The first term in the names that we lower branches, shown in Fig. 4(d); attributed to these hybrid polaritons indicate the condensed matter excitation that primarily inter- 3. The asymmetry of the decay of the E component cats with the field; it also determines its polariza- at two sides of the graphene sheet. tion (TE or TM). The electromagnetic field is, for all modes, predomi- 2. They are extremely non-local, as they reside simul- nantly concentrated nearby the graphene layer. The dis- taneously at the graphene and the AF surface. As tribution of the electric field depends strongly on the mo- a rule of thumb, the electromagnetic coupling be- mentum k and the SPMP branch. In Fig. 4(c) we show tween these two layers survives as long as their sep- E (z), in units of E (d), for 4 different SPMP modes, la- y y aration d is smaller than the wavelength of the EM belled with A,B,C and D, shown in Fig. 4(a). Modes A field at the relevant frequencies. Therefore, it sur- and D lie away from the anti-crossing of the branches and vives to distances way above above 500 nanometers. have a marked surface-plasmon character: their decay is the same at both sides (z < d and z > d) of graphene, 3. Their properties can be tuned by changing the car- and their profile almost does not change at the AF surface rier density in graphene. (z = 0). In contrast, modes B and C with frequencies The recently discovered two-dimensional magnetic ma- nearby the AFMR frequency are asymmetric and change terials [23–27] and the fabrication of Van der Waals radically at the AF surface. heterostructures integrating 2D magnetic crystals with The evolution of the group velocity of the two branches as a function of k, for three values of E , shown in Fig. graphene and other non-magnetic 2D crystals [28–34] opens up the possibility of observing the same effects dis- 4(d), shows very clearly that the hybrid SPMP modes cussed in this work but in the context of van der Waals are combining the dispersive graphene SPP with a non- heterostructures. If the antiferromagnet is also metal- dispersive mode with ! = . As the carrier density in lic, then for frequencies below the plasma frequency, we graphene is varied, and thereby E , SPMP dispersion is would have a system exhibiting both negative permit- changed, and as a result, so is the value of k at which the tivity and permeability functions. This material would anticrossing takes place. present intrinsic negative refraction. In addition, the proximity of a graphene layer could be used for tuning VI. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS the electromagnetic properties of the material. The prospects opened by 2D materials allow to envi- sion many different arrangement of these systems leading In this work we have investigated the electromagnetic to a new class of metamaterials with tunable electromag- properties of an antiferromagnetic insulator in the prox- netic properties promoted by the existence of magnetic imity of a graphene sheet. We have found two new types order. of hybrid polaritons that combine the electromagnetic field with the magnetization in the magnetic material and the free carrier response of Dirac electrons in graphene: ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 1. A TE-polarized surface magnon-plasmon polariton (SMPP), propagating perpendicular to the direc- Y. B., M. V. and N. M. R. P. acknowledge sup- tion of staggerred magnetization in the AF. The port from the European Commission through the project group velocity of this mode becomes negative as "Graphene- Driven Revolutions in ICT and Beyond" jE j is ramped up, resulting in a collective mode (Ref. No. 785219), and the Portuguese Foundation in the AF surface whose propagation direction can for Science and Technology (FCT) in the framework be steered upon gating the graphene layer, located of the Strategic Financing UID/FIS/04650/2013. Ad- at a distance of a few hundred nanometers away. ditionally, N. M. R. P. acknowledges COMPETE2020, PORTUGAL2020, FEDER and the Portuguese Founda- 2. A TM-polarized surface plasmon-magnon polari- tion for Science and Technology (FCT) through project ton (SPMP), propagating along the staggerred PTDC/FIS-NAN/3668/2013 and FEDER and the por- magnetization direction, which hybdridizes the tuguese Foundation for Science and Technology (FCT) surface-plasmon polariton in graphene and the bare through project POCI-01-0145-FEDER-028114. G. A. magnons at the AF. Farias acknowledge support from the Conselho Nacional In both instances, a quantized theory of this new po- de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico (CNPq) laritons implies a new type of hybrid collective modes of Brazil. J. F.-R. acknowledge financial support that combine of surface plasmons in graphene, magnons from FCT for the P2020-PTDC/FIS-NAN/4662/2014, in the antiferromagnets and the photon field. These new the P2020-PTDC/FIS-NAN/3668/2014 and the UTAP- collective excitations have very exotic properties: EXPL/NTec/0046/2017 projects, as well as Generali- 11 tat Valenciana funding Prometeo2017/139 and MINECO owing the Eq.(A3). The components of the respective Spain (Grant No. MAT2016-78625-C2). electric field can be defined from Eq. (A1) (!) 0 a E = H (A9) Appendix A: Transverse bulk waves [u cos ' cos  + u sin  u sin ' cos ] : x y z Let us imagine that antiferromagnetic medium charac- terized by the magnetic permeability tensor (1) occupies Notice that in this representation the electric field is per- all the space 1 < z < 1. In this case wave propa- pendicular to magnetic field, E ? H, what follows from gation is governed by Maxwell equations (7), which solu- the scalar product E H = 0. tions we will seek in the form of travelling waves E (r; t) = Eq. (68) have two solution for ! – acoustic ! and op- E exp(ikri!t), H(r; t) = H exp(ikri!t), propagating tical ! modes in arbitrary direction k with amplitudes of electromag- netic field E, H. Under this assumption, jointly with 2 2 2 2 ! = f (k) f (k) c k the constitutive relations D(r; t) = " E exp(ikr i!t), B(r; t) =   ^ (!) H exp(ikri!t) Maxwell equations (7) will be rewritten as 2 2 2 2 ! = f (k) + f (k) c k k H = !" E; (A1) with k E = !  ^ (!) H; (A2) 2 2 2 c k + ik E = 0; (A3) 0 2 f (k) = + : (A10) ik  ^ (!) H = 0: (A4) This is dissimilar to the case of a metal described by a Notice that in this Appendix we omit index j for brevity. Drude optical response, where only one transverse bulk If we apply operator k to Eq. (A1) and use Eq. (A2), mode exists. Spectra of these two bulk TM-polarized we have magnon-polariton modes are depicted in Fig. 2 by dashed k (k H) = k (k H) k H red lines. The spectrum of the acoustic mode starts at zero frequency and in at long-wavelength limit k ! 0 is =  ^ (!) H: (A5) described by the approximate expression as For the transverse waves the wavevector k should be or- thogonal to the magnetic field H, i.e. (k H) = 0. Fur- !  kc : (A11) 2 2 + 2 ther this wave will be referred to as TM-polarized bulk 0 s polariton. Simultaneously with Eq. (A4) this condition In short-wavelength limit k ! 1 the dispersion curve of can be satisfied only if H  0. In this case the Helmholtz acoustic mode asymptotically approaches the frequency equation (A5) for components of the magnetic field H as and H will be rewritten as : (A12) a 0 2 2 (ck) k  (!) H = 0 = H ; (A6) x 1 x It should be underlined that the spectrum of the acoustic mode is located at the right of the light line ! = ck k  (!) H = 0 = H : (A7) z 1 z (depicted by dashed black line in Fig. 3). This fact means that phase velocity of the acoustic mode, ! =k is smaller For nonzero amplitudes this system of equation will than the velocity of light in vacuum c for all values of the have solution only when condition = 0 is met, thus wavevector k. Eq. (68) determines the dispersion relation of bulk waves. The optical mode spectrum starts at the frequency If the wavevector is represented in spherical coordinates 2 2 + 2 , and in the limit k ! 0 its approximate dis- 0 s as persion relation can be represented as k =  (!) (u cos ' sin  + u cos x y q 2 2 2 c c k + 2 + ; (A13) 0 s +u sin ' sin ) ; (A8) 2 3=2 z ( + 2 0 s the respective components of the magnetic field will be while in the limit k ! 1 the optical mode’s approximate H = H (u sin ' + u cos '). In these equations  is x z dispersion relation is the polar angle between the y-axis and wavevector, and ' is the azimuthal angle in plane xz. The electric field !  kc + : (A14) is also perpendicular to the direction of the propagation ck 12 Thus, at large values of wavevector k, the optical mode light line. spectrum asymptotically approaches light line ! = ck. It is interesting that no bulk magnon polariton mode Contrary to the acoustic mode, the optical one is charac- exists in the frequency range < ! < + 2 0 s terized by phase velocity larger than the velocity of light between the highest frequency of the acoustic mode and in vacuum c, and its spectrum is located at the left of the lowest frequency of the optical mode. Notice, that this gap is characterized by the negative values of  (!) < 0. [1] F. Keffer and C. Kittel, Physical Review 85, 329 (1952). demic Press, 2017) pp. 91 – 155. [2] R. E. Camley and D. L. Mills, Phys. Rev. B 26, 1280 [21] M. Jablan, H. Buljan, and M. Soljačić, Physical Review (1982). B 80 (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevB.80.245435. [3] M. R. F. Jensen, T. J. Parker, K. Abraha, and D. R. [22] Y. V. 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Hybrid plasmon-magnon polaritons in graphene-antiferromagnet heterostructures

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Abstract

1 1 3 2;4 1;2 1;2 Y. V. Bludov , J. N. Gomes , G. A. Farias , J. Fernández-Rossier , M. I. Vasilevskiy , N. M. R. Peres Department of Physics, Center of Physics, and QuantaLab, University of Minho, Campus of Gualtar, 4710-057, Braga, Portugal QuantaLab,International Iberian Nanotechnology Laboratory (INL), Av. Mestre José Veiga, 4715-330 Braga, Portugal Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Caixa Postal 6030, Campus do Pici, 60455-900 Fortaleza, Ceará, Brazil and Departamento de Física Aplicada, Universidad de Alicante, Carretera de San Vicente del Raspeig 03690 San Vicente del Raspeig, Alicante, España We consider a hybrid structure formed by graphene and an insulating antiferromagnet, separated by a dielectric of thickness up to d ' 500 nm. When uncoupled, both graphene and the antiferro- magneic surface host their own polariton modes coupling the electromagnetic field with plasmons in the case of graphene, and with magnons in the case of the antiferromagnet. We show that the hy- brid structure can host two new types of hybrid polariton modes. First, a surface magnon-plasmon polariton whose dispersion is radically changed by the carrier density of the graphene layer, includ- ing a change of sign in the group velocity. Second, a surface plasmon-magnon polariton formed as a linear superposition of graphene surface plasmon and the antiferromagnetic bare magnon. This polariton has a dispersion with two branches, formed by the anticrossing between the dispersive surface plasmon and the magnon. We discuss the potential these new modes have for combining photons, magnons, and plasmons to reach new functionalities. I. INTRODUCTION The fabrication of nanostructures offers a new arena to explore hybrid systems with collective modes in the spin and charge sectors, that could result in a new type of Plasmons, excitons, phonons, and magnons are typi- polariton, mixing spin and charge collective modes. Here cal examples of collective excitations in condensed mat- we explore this possibility in a system that seems easy to ter systems. They all imply the presence of poles with fabricate with state of the art techniques. We consider frequencies in the spectrum of the response function the coupling of surface magnon polaritons of an uniax- that describes the interaction of the system with elec- ial antiferromagnet (AF) to surface plasmon polaritons tromagnetic waves. As a result, the propagation of elec- (SPPs) in graphene. tromagnetic waves with frequency ! in a material that hosts these collective modes is strongly modified, or even The antiferromagnetic resonance (AFMR) frequency in insulating unixaxial antiferromagnets, that ultimately suppressed altogether, for ! ' . This general physical phenomenon is rationalized in terms of the formation of determines the magnon-polariton frequency, occurs in the THz range, well above the typical GHz range for ferro- new collective modes known as polaritons. magnetic resonance and, importantly, within the spectral Quantum mechanically, polaritons are described as hy- range of graphene SPPs. The difference between AFMR brid collective excitations that are linear superpositions and ferromagnetic resonance arises from the fact that the of a matter collective excitation and a photon. Semi- former is determined by the interplay of exchange and classically, they are described using Maxwell equations anisotropy [1], whereas the latter is only given by mag- and constitutive relations that include the frequency de- netic anisotropy, which is much smaller in most cases. It pendent response functions. In both instances, the un- has been shown [2, 3] that uniaxial AFs, such as FeF , derlying physical phenomenon is the emergence of a new host both bulk and surface magnon polaritons (SMPs). type of wave or excitation, with properties different from These surface polaritons decay exponentially as we move those of the constituent collective mode and electromag- away from the antiferromagnet-dielectric interface. netic wave. Excitons, phonons, and plasmons, couple predomi- The formation of hybrid modes occurs when the un- nantly to the electric component of the electromagnetic coupled modes are degenerate. Therefore, the existence wave. In contrast, for magnon-polaritons, it is the mag- of an experimental knob to tune the frequency of the netic field that couples to the spins. Most of the work modes is very convenient. In the case of graphene, gat- so far has focused on polaritons that couple electromag- ing controls the carrier density, leading to a change of the netic waves with just one type of collective mode (exci- dispersion curve of SPPs. Therefore, here we consider a tons, phonons, plasmons, spin waves). Interestingly, the graphene sheet at a distance d from the surface of an in- same electromagnetic field would couple both to the spin sulating AF, as shown in Fig. 1. Since both graphene and charge sector in a system that hosts both spin and and the insulating AF host their own polariton modes, charge collective modes. The electromagnetic field of po- here we explore whether this hybrid artificial material laritons would thus provide a coupling channel between system hosts a new type of hybrid polariton that couples excitations that are normally un-coupled. graphene surface plasmons and AF magnons at the same arXiv:1902.00708v1 [cond-mat.mes-hall] 2 Feb 2019 2 romagnet. Thus, we consider the semi-infinite AF, oc- cupying the half-space z < 0. The other half-space z > 0 is supposed to be occupied by the vacuum with the graphene monolayer, arranged at plane z = d paral- lel to the AF surface (see Fig. 1). The semi-infinite uniaxial antiferromagnet, such as FeF or MnF [2, 3], is described by the permeablilty ten- 2 2 sor 2 3 0 i a b 4 5 ^ (!) = 0 1 0 : (1) i 0 b a The off-diagonal component  is finite in the presence of an external magnetic field H , that permits to tune the antiferromagnetic resonance frequency. In addition, application of the latter provides tunability of the reso- nance. In this work we only consider the case H = 0, so that  = 0 and [1]: (!) = 1 + ; (2) 2 2 Here, =  2H H + H is the antiferromag- 0 0 a e Figure 1. Schematic drawing of the system considered in this netic resonance frequency, that, unlike the case of uniax- work: a graphene sheet is located at a distance d from the ial ferromagnets, depends not only on the anisotropy field surface of an antiferromagnet, characterized by a magnetic permeability tensor (!). H , but as well on the exchange field H , which makes a e much larger than the usual ferromagnetic resonance frequencies. time. The gyromagnetic ratio is given by = e=(2m) where e and m are the charge and mass of free electron, corre- In this work we show that indeed the tunability of the electromagnetic properties of an antiferromagnetic insu- spondingly. The so called saturation frequency is given by =  2H M , where M denotes the saturation lator can be achieved by gating a graphene sheet (see s 0 a s s magnetization of each sublattice. Fig. 1). In particular, we find a smooth transition from A calculation of the permeability tensor for this sys- the conventional regime where the system has the en- tem was performed long ago [1, 5–8]. Equation (2) can ergy propagation oriented along the same direction of the be obtained from a microscopic model Hamiltonian for SMP’s wave vector to a regime where the energy flux is spins, using both the spin wave approximation and Kubo opposite to the wavevector, i.e. the group velocity of the formula for linear response to a transverse ac field of fre- hybrid excitation is negative. If the dielectric layer be- quency ! and zero wavevector. Expression (2) is real, tween graphene and the antiferromagnet has a negative electric permittivity, as it happens in a polar crystal near ignoring thereby losses. These could be included by re- placing ! by ! + i, where describes a scattering rate. optical phonon resonances, a metamaterial [4] with both negative  and  can be achieved, thus exhibiting nega- The spectral range for which  (!) < 0 plays a very special role, as it becomes evident below. The condition tive refraction. Such a tunable system allows to control the direction of energy flow at the surface of the anti-  (!) < 0 is met for < ! < + 2 a 0 0 s ferromagnet, thus providing a mechanism for directional propagation of the electromagnetic energy, without the B. Maxwell equations and boundary conditions need of an external magnetic field. The electromagnetic waves in such a layered structure are governed by macroscopic Maxwell equations, II. PROBLEM STATEMENT AND MAIN EQUATIONS @D (2D) rotH = + J  (z d) (3) A. Antiferromagnetic permeability @t @B rotE = (4) The main objective of this paper is to investigate how @t the presence of graphene in the vicinity of an antiferro- (2D) divD =   (z d) (5) magnet influences the spectrum of SMPs, and vice versa, divB = 0; (6) how the SPPs in graphene are affected by the antifer- 3 where delta-functions in Eqs.(3) and (5) describe the two- C. In plane propagation perpendicular to the (2D) (2D) staggered magnetization dimensional nature of charges  and current J in the graphene monolayer. Maxwell equations (3)–(6) can be solved separately in We consider first the case where the electromagnetic three spatial domains z < 0, 0 < z < d and z > d, which wave propagates in the direction x, perpendicular to the direction of magnetization. This means that the problem further in the paper will be denoted by j = 1; 2 and 3, correspondingly. In the framework of this formalism, the under consideration is uniform in the direction y (i.e. @=@y  0), and Maxwell equations (7)-(10) can be de- Maxwell equations have the form: composed into two independent subsystems, which cor- respond to TE and TM polarizations. The TE-polarized (j) (j) wave includes the y-component of the electric field E as @D (j) (j) rotH = ; (7) well as x- and z-components of the magnetic field H , @t i.e. (j) @B (j) rotE = ; (8) @t (j) divD = 0; (9) (j) (j) E (x; z; t) = u E (x; z; t); (19) (j) divB = 0; (10) (j) (j) (j) H (x; z; t) = u H (x; z; t) + u H (x; z; t): (20) x z x z and media indices are added as superscripts to the elec- Here u and u are unit vectors in directions x and y, x y (j) (j) (j) (j) tric and magnetic fields E , H D , B . It is no- respectively. The second subsystem, describing the TM- table that charges and currents induced in graphene do polarized wave, possesses x- and z-components of the not enter explicitly Eqs. (7). These quantities are present electric field and y-component of the magnetic field, in boundary conditions, which couples the electromag- netic fields in media j = 2 and j = 3. The boundary (j) (j) H (x; z; t) = u H (x; z; t); (21) conditions at graphene plane take the explicit form: (j) (j) (j) E (x; z; t) = u E (x; z; t) + u E (x; z; t): (22) x z x z (3) (2) u  E E = 0; (11) z=d Moreover, one can assume the temporal and spatial de- (3) (2) (2D) pendencies of the electromagnetic fields as those of a u  H H = J ; (12) z=d plane wave with frequency !, travelling along the x-axis (j) (3) (2) (2D) with wave-number k, that is, we can write E (x; z; t) = D D  u =  ; (13) z=d (j) (j) (j) E (z) exp(ikx i!t), H (x; z; t) = H (z) exp(ikx (3) (2) (j) B B  u = 0: (14) i!t). In this formalism the wave amplitudes E and z=d (j) H depend upon z-coordinate only. We now take into account the constitutive relations: Here u is a unit vector in the direction z, ”” and ”” mean vector and scalar products, respectively. The (j) (j) D = " E exp(ikx i!t); (23) antiferromagnet is insulating, and therefore has no free 0 (1) (1) charges and currents. In addition, we are assuming there B =   ^H exp(ikx i!t); (24) is no surface magnetization. As a result, the boundary (j6=1) (j6=1) B =  H exp(ikx i!t): (25) conditions between media j = 1 and j = 2, at the surface 0 of the antiferromagnet, can be written as: Such form of the constitutive relations describes the fact that the dielectric permittivities of all three media are (2) (1) u  E E = 0; (15) equal to vacuum permittivity " , and the magnetic per- z=0 0 meability tensor of antiferromagnetic medium (j = 1) is (2) (1) u  H H = 0; (16) z=0 equal to  . (2) (1) Under all these assumptions, Maxwell equations (7) for D D  u = 0; (17) z=0 the TE-polarization take the form (2) (1) B B  u = 0: (18) z=0 (j) dH (j) (j) ikH = i!" E ; (26) z 0 y dz (j) dE (j) In the following we look for the equations describing = i! [ (!)  + (1  )] H ; (27) 0 a j;1 j;1 dz electromagnetic waves with the propagation vector k ly- (j) (j) ikE = i! [ (!)  + (1  )] H (28) y 0 a j;1 j;1 z ing in-plane. There are two cases, k parallel and perpen- dicular to the AF’s staggered magnetization M , that we take along y (see Fig. 1). where  is the Kronecker delta. Correspondingly, the j;1 4 Maxwell equations for the TM-polarization read: Surface polariton type System Pol. Wavevector Magnon AF TE k M = 0 (j) dE (j) (j) Plasmon G TM isotropic ikE = i! H ; (29) z y dz Magnon-plasmon AF+G TE k M = 0 (j) dH (j) Plasmon-magnon AF+G TM k M = 0 = i!" E ; (30) dz (j) (j) Table I. Summary of the different surface polariton excitations ikH = i!" E ; (31) y z discussed in this work. The type of the polariton indicates the elementary excitation coupled to the EM field, except for the It is crucial that Eqs. (26)–(28) for the TE-polarization third line where plasmons are not directly involved in the involve only the  =  components of the magnetic xx zz hybrid wave. permeability tensor  ^ (!) [see Eq. (1)]. As a consequence, the magnetic medium is effectively isotropic with respect to the TE-polarized wave, when electromagnetic wave of the magnetic permeability tensor (1), is effectively propagates along x-direction (perpendicular to the stag- anisotropic with respect to the TE-polarized waves [see gered magnetization). At the same time, only yy compo- Eqs. (32)]. Furthermore, the AF medium influences the nent of the magnetic permeability tensor  ^ (!) is present properties of the TM-polarized waves [see Eq. (35)]. in the Maxwell equations for the TM-polarized wave (29), which is equal to unity [see Eq. (1)]. Therefore, we would expect that the AF medium in the structure depicted in III. UNCOUPLED MODES: SURFACE Fig. 1 would not exert any influence on the spectrum of PLASMON-POLARITONS AND SURFACE the TM-polarized wave. As we will see this is not exactly MAGNON-POLARITONS the case near the resonance frequency In this section we briefly revisit the properties of the SPPs in graphene, on one side, and the SMPs in the AF in D. In plane propagation parallel to the staggered the other, ignoring their mutual coupling. This provides magnetization a background to understand the nature of the new hybrid collective modes that arise in the combined graphene/AF We now consider the propagation along the y direction, structure. We keep the discussion at a qualitative level. parallel to the staggered magnetization. In this case the The quantitative theory presented in the next sections homogeneity of the system under consideration in the includes, as limiting cases, a theoretical description of direction x (@=@x  0) also implies the separation of these excitations. Maxwell equations (7)-(10) into the TE subsystem: (j) dH A. Magnon–polaritons (j) (j) ikH = i!" E ; (32) z x dz (j) The case of bulk magnon-polaritons for a uniaxial an- dE (j) = i! H ; (33) tiferromagnet was studied by [2]. It was found that only dz TE modes exist, with a dispersion relation that we derive (j) (j) ikE = i! [ (!)  + (1  )] H (34) 0 a j;1 j;1 x z in the appendix A and is depicted in Fig.2 by dashed red lines. The magnon–polariton dispersion is mathemati- and the TM subsystem: cally identical to the case of Hopfield exciton–polaritons in a semiconductor. Magnon–polaritons come in two (j) dE branches [acoustical ! (k) and optical ! (k)], both twice (j) a o ikE = (35) degenerate on account of the dimension of the symme- dz (j) try plane perpendicular to the easy axis. At frequen- = i! [ (!)  + (1  )] H ; (36) 0 a j;1 j;1 cies far from the AFMR resonance, ! 7 these two (j) dH x branches are close to the photon dispersion curve ! = ck, (j) = i!" E ; (37) dz while in the frequency range ! . the lowest, acoustic (j) (j) branch asymptotically approaches the AFRM frequency ikH = i!" E : (38) x z as k ! 1, i.e. ! (1) = . In the vicinity of the AFMR a 0 While obtaining these equation, we used the frequency two modes are separated by the frequency gap, plane-wave spatio-temporal dependence of the field whose value is roughly given by ! (0)! (1) o a 0 (j) (j) (j) E (y; z; t) = E (z) exp(iky i!t), H (y; z; t) = At the surface of AF, the collective excitations of (j) H (z) exp(iky i!t), as well as the constitutive rela- spins, i.e. magnons can be coupled to an electomag- tions, similar to Eqs. (23) (except the dependence upon netic wave, forming surface magnon-polaritons (SMP). y-coordinate instead of x). As a result, the antiferro- The key property of SMPs [see the first line of Table I] is magnet, whose response involves components yy and zz that they are TE-polarized waves and it was first consid- 5 since they are characterized by both a longer lifetime and a higher degree of field confinement [10, 11]. If graphene layer is deposited on a polar substrate, the electromag- netic field of graphene SPPs can interact with optical phonons in the substrate, thus forming hybrid modes called surface plasmon-phonon-polaritons [12–16]. Here, we also expect hybrid polaritons invloving two physically distinct elementary excitations in the materials involved. This mode will be called surface plasmon-magnon po- lariton (SPMP) and its properties are summarized in the forth line of Table I. The study of this mode will be considered in detail in Sec. V. However, the system considered in the present work is different from sur- face plasmon-phonon-polaritons in one important aspect. The two materials combined in our system, if taken sep- arately, support surface waves whose polarizations are orthogonal to each other. From Table I, it is apparent that graphene SPPs are TM modes whereas AF’s surface magnon–polaritons are TE modes. Therefore, in order to study the polaritons of the hybrid system, we need to consider both TM and Figure 2. Schematic dispersion relation of surface (blue solid TE modes. line) and bulk (red dashed lines) magnon-polaritons in the system without graphene, E = 0, and with the AF param- eters = 0:5 . The black dashed line corresponds to the s 0 IV. SURFACE MAGNON-PLASMON vacuum light line ! = kc, while frequencies 0 s 2 2 POLARITONS and + 2 are depicted by horizontal dash-and-dotted black lines (from bottom to top, respectively). A. General equations for TE modes ered by Camley e Mills [2] (see also Ref. [9]). One of the In this Section we shall demonstrate that interaction first reported [3] observations of SMPs was in the anti- between magnons and free charges in graphene via elec- ferromagnet FeF using the technique of attenuated total tromagnetic radiation modifies the spectrum of SMP. reflection. The same method first used to observe SPPs Boundary condition on graphene (12) couples the in- in metallic-dielectric interfaces. These surface magnon– plane components of the electric and magnetic fields; polaritons [depicted by blue solid line in Fig. 2] only exist in the case opf TE modes it involves transverse plas- for ck > , as we show below [see subsection IV B]. mons in graphene. For such plasmons, the current is In Sec. IV we study how the interaction between elec- perpendicular to the wavevector, the charge density is tromagnetic field of SMP at vacuum/AF interface and kept constant[17] and they do not interact with the elec- forced charge-carrier oscillations in graphene modify the tromagnetic radiation directly. However, in the hybrid SMP spectrum. The resulting hybrid mode will be re- structure considered here they can interact indirectly, ferred to as surface magnon-plasmon polariton and its through the AF whose magnons do couple to the TE- fundamental properties are summarized in the third line polarized radiation. Such hybrid evanescent waves will of Table I. be called surface magnon–plasmon–polaritons (SMPP). They propagate along the direction perpendicular to the staggered magnetization in the antiferromagnet. B. Graphene surface plasmon-polaritons It should be noticed that the frequency range of the an- tiferromagnetic resonance lies in the THz spectral region, Graphene SPPs can be understood as solutions of the where interband transitions in graphene play no role. Maxwell equations that describe an electromagnetic wave Therefore, we consider the optical response of graphene propagating along a conductive graphene sheet. The elec- described by a Drude formula without losses:[18] tromagnetic field is strongly confined in the neighbour- hood of the graphene, with evanescent off-plane tails. 2e E (!) = i ; (39) Graphene SPPs are TM-polarized and their dispersion h ~! curve, !(k) < ck, can be tuned by controlling the carrier density. Fundamental properties of SPPs in graphene are with E being the Fermi energy of doped graphene. This briefly summarized in the second line of Table I. equation is valid as long as the Fermi energy is much Compared to the SPPs at the surface of noble met- larger than k T (k is the Boltzmann constant and T B B als, the graphene polaritons have significant advantages the temperature). 6 The propagation of TE-polarized waves is governed by of these two modes. In terms of hyperbolic functions and the Maxwell equations in the form (26)–(28). Substitu- amplitudes of electric field at boundaries z = 0 and z = d, tion of Eqs. (27) and (28) into Eq. (26) results into the this solution can be represented as Helmholtz equation, (2) (2) (2) E (z) = E (0)F (d z ) + E (d)F (z ); (49) S 2 2 S 2 y y y (2) (2) (j) 2 H (z) =  E (0)F (d z ) (50) x C 2 2 x y d E 2 (j) + k E i dz (2) E (d)F (z ) ; (51) C 2 (j) h i = [ (!)  + (1  )] E ; (40) a j;1 j;1 2 (2) (2) (2) H (z) =  E (0)F (d z ) + E (d)F (z ) ; z z y S 2 2 y S 2 (52) whose solution in semi-infinite media j = 1 and j = 3 can be expressed as where we have defined (1) (1) (1) E (z) = E (0) exp( z); (41) y y sinh(z ) cosh(z ) 2 2 h i F (z )  ; F (z )  ; (53) S 2 C 2 (3) (3) (2) sinh(d ) sinh(d ) E (z) = E (d) exp (z d) ; (42) 2 2 y y (2) ;  = : (54) (1) (3) x z with E (0) and E (d) being the values of electric field i! ! y y 0 0 at the surface of the antiferromagnet and graphene, re- For the particular case of TE-polarized wave (and spectively, and plane wave temporal and spatial dependencies, men- (1) 2 2 2 tioned above), first and second relations in the boundary = k !  (!) =c ; (43) conditions (11) and (16) are expressed as (2) 2 2 2 = k ! =c : (44) In the considered framework we assume, for simplicity, (3) (2) E (d) = E (d) ; (55) y y that both the antiferromagnet and graphene are lossless (3) (2) (2) H (d) H (d) = (!)E (d) ; (56) media, which means that both the in-plane wavevector k x x y and frequency ! have real and positive values. Moreover, (2) (1) E (0) = E (0) ; (57) y y (1) since we are interested in studying the surface wave, (2) (1) (2) H (0) H (0) = 0: (58) and are also real and characterize the inverse pen- x x etration length of the evanescent fields. The respective It should be pointed out that boundary condition (56) signs of the exponents in Eqs. (41) and (42) were chosen was obtained by using the two-dimensional current in to satisfy the boundary conditions at z = 1 [namely, (2D) (1) (3) graphene J expressed via the graphene conductivity E (1) = E (1) = 0], which describe the absence y y and electric field as of modes, growing exponentially towards jzj ! 1. (2D) (2) The respective magnetic fields in media j = 1 and J = u  (!) E (d) exp (ikx i!t) : (59) y y j = 3 can be obtained by substituting Eqs. (41) and (42) into Eqs. (27) and (28), and expressing the fields as Substitution of Eqs. (45) and (51) into boundary condi- tions (56) results into the homogeneous linear system of equations: (1) (1) (1) z ! ! ! (2) H (z) = E (0) e ; (45) x y (2) i!  (!) 0 a 11 E (d) 0 sinh(d ) y = ; (60) (2) (2) (1) (1) z E (0) 0 1 M y sinh(d ) H (z) = E (0) e ; (46) 2 z y !  (!) 0 a where (2) (3) (3) (z d ) 2 2 H (z) = E (d) e ; (47) x y (2) i! (2) M  + i!  (!) ; (61) 11 0 tanh(d ) (3) (3) (z d ) 2 2 H (z) = E (d) e ; (48) z y (2) (1) M  + : (62) tanh(d )  (!) 2 a (j) where we have adopted the notation z  z, d j j (j) d with j = 1; 2. Non trivial solutions of Eq. (60) occur when the deter- For the spacer layer j = 2 that separates graphene and minant of the matrix vanishes: the AF’s surface, 0 < z < d, there are no restrictions on (2) the presence of exponentially growing or decaying modes. M M = 0 (63) 11 22 As a result, the solution is composed as the superposition sinh(d ) 2 7 For a given value of k, this equation can be satisfied by Expectedly, the SMP’s spectrum appears in the gap several values of ! (k) that define the different polariton between two branches of the TM-polarized bulk magnon- modes in the system, which are distinguished by the in- polariton dispersion relation, dex . In the following we discuss these polariton modes (1) = 0; (68) in two cases. First, we take the d ! 1 limit, where there is no coupling between graphene and the AF’s sur- which is depicted in Fig. 2 by red dashed lines (see Ap- face. This permits to recover an expression for the surface pendix A). magnon-polariton [2]. Later we shall also take the limit (2) where d is small, for which the presence of graphene modifies the SMP properties. (2) C. Dressing: the finite d < 1 case We now discuss the influence of graphene on the prop- B. No dressing: the d ! 1 limit erties of the SMP. This happens when the distance be- (2) tween antiferromagnet and graphene is such that d is In the case of infinite distance d ! 1 between the an- not very large and the Fermi energy in graphene is not tiferromagnet surface and graphene monolayer, the dis- at the Dirac point, E 6= 0. In this case the spectrum persion relation (63) transforms into of SMPs is strongly modified owing to the influence of h i (1) free charges in graphene on the electromagnetic field of (2) (2) 2 i!  (!) + = 0: (64) the SMP, supported by the surface of the AF. The SMP (!) spectrum (63) for relatively small distance d = 500 nm is depicted in Fig. 3(a) for different values of the Fermi en- The term in the first braces of Eq. (64) is always positive ergy. Thus, for finite doping of the graphene, the dressed owing to the positiveness of the imaginary part of Drude SMP spectrum has a starting-point with the frequency conductivity (39)[19], while setting equal to zero the sec- ! > , lying on the light line. An increase of the Fermi ond term in braces in (64) yields the dispersion relation energy E results into the shift of the starting-point of of the SMP existing at single interface between vacuum the spectrum towards higher frequencies. An expression and antiferromagnet[7]. for the starting-point frequency (1) (2) Since both and , defined in Eqs.(43), are positive, Eq.(64) only has solutions when  (!) < 0, a 2 2 2 a 2b 2 0 s 0 i.e. in the aforementioned frequency range 0 ! = p i 2 (a b) 2 2 + 2 . The simultaneous positiveness of the ar- 0 s (1) (2) # p 1=2 guments of and in that range takes place when 4 2 2 2 2 a + 8ab (2 0 s s 0 k  !=c, i.e., at the right of the "light line" ! = ck (which + > ; (69) 2 (a b) is depicted in Fig. 2 by black dashed line). SMP’s disper- sion relation (64) after some algebra can be expressed in can be obtained explicitly from the dispersion relation the explicit form (2) (63) by putting the condition = 0. In Eq. (69) 2 2 a = [1 + 4 E d=(~c)] , b = 8 [ E =(~ )] , and = F F s 2 0 2 2 ! = + + c k e =(4" ~c) is the fine-structure constant. It is apparent that results are independent of the sign of E , i.e., for s F 1=2 (65) graphene with extra electrons or holes. 2 2 2 2 2 c k + ) ; In the k ! 1 limit, the spectrum tends to ! = s 0 s . Therefore, as E is ramped up and the 0 s spectrum is pushed up in frequency at the smallest al- which is depicted in Fig. 2 by solid blue line. The SMP’s lowed values of k, so that the starting SMPP’s fre- spectrum starts on the light line at frequency ! = quency becomes larger than that limiting frequency (! > and wavevector k = =c. In the vicinity of this point, 0 2 ), their group velocity v = d!=dk has to the dispersion relation is described approximately by the be negative. This happens at experimentally attain- relation able dopings of the graphene. For E = 0:01 eV and 2 E = 0:03 eV, orange and green lines in Fig. 3(c), respec- + (ck ) : (66) 0 0 tively, v < 0 in a range of high values of k. For higher 2 g + 2 0 s values of E [ E = 0:4 eV, red line in Fig. 3(c)] v < 0 F F g for all values of k. At large wavevectors, k ! 1, the SMP’s spectrum 2 2 This result is distinct from the zero Fermi energy case, asymptotically approaches the frequency ! = 0 s where SMPP’s group velocity [slope of the dispersion as curve, !(k), depicted by solid blue line in Fig. 3(a)] is positive in all range of frequencies and wavevectors. It is 1 : (67) s 0 2 2 possible to see, that the group velocity is much smaller 4c k 8 V. SURFACE PLASMON-MAGNON POLARITONS A. Equations for TM modes We now consider the case of TM-polarization, for which the graphene layer is able to sustain SPPs, os- cillations of charge-carrier density in graphene coupled to the electromagnetic radiation[21, 22]. We anticipate our main finding: in the AF-graphene coupled structure, the graphene SPP is hybridized with the AF magnon, resulting in a polariton spectrum with 2 branches, that reflects the emergence of a hybrid collective mode that combines graphene plasmons with AF magnons. We shall call these hybrid excitations surface plasmon–magnon– polaritons (SPMPs). We address the case where the electromagnetic field is TM polarized and wave propagates along the y-axis, i.e. parallel to the staggerred magnetization. In this situa- tion the electromagnetic field is defined by the Maxwell equations in the form of Eqs. (35). Their solutions in the AF region can be expressed as Figure 3. (a) Surface magnon–plasmon–polariton (SMPP) !" (1) (1) H (z) = i E (0) exp(z ); (70) x y spectrum in the AF/graphene structure for Fermi energy val- (1) ues E = 0 (solid blue line), 0:01 eV (solid orange line), (1) (1) E (z) = E (0) exp(z ); (71) 0:03 eV (solid green line), and 0:4 eV (solid red line). Black y y dashed line stands for the light line in vacuum, ! = ck; (b) (1) (1) E (z) = i E (0) exp(z ); (72) Spatial distributions of the SMPP electric field for the modes 1 z y (1) with ck= = 1:46 and 0:01 eV (orange line A), 0:03 eV (green line B), and 0:4 eV (red line C). These modes are indicated The solutions in the spacer region j = 2 can be written in panel (a) by the respective letters A, B and C. The re- up as: gion occupied by the antiferromagnet is shadowed in panel (b) and the position of graphene is shown by vertical bold h i i!" (2) (2) (2) black solid line; (c) Group velocity, v = d!=dk (in dimen- g H (z) = E (0)F (d z ) E (d)F (z ) ; C 2 2 C 2 x y y (2) sionless units v =c) of the SMPP modes with E = 0:01 eV g F (73) (orange line), 0:03 eV (green line), and 0:4 eV (red line). In all panels the fields and magnetization of the antiferromagnet (2) (2) (2) E (z) = E (0)F (d z ) + E (d)F (z ); (74) S 2 2 S 2 y y y are  H = 0:787 T,  H = 55:3 T, and  M = 0:756 T, 0 a 0 e 0 s h i ik for the antiferromagnet MnF [20]. The spacer between the (2) (2) (2) E (z) = E (0)F (d z ) E (d)F (z ) : C 2 2 C 2 z y y (2) antiferromagnet and graphene has thickness d = 500 nm. The magnitude of the fields was chosen arbitrarily for convenient (75) visualization of their profiles. Finally, the solutions in the j = 3 region, above graphene, read: !" (3) (3) (z d ) 2 2 H (z) = i E (d)e ; (76) x x (2) than the speed of light in vacuum, c. Even more, in (3) (3) (z d ) 2 2 short-wavelength limit ck= & 30 the group velocity is 0 E (z) = E (d) e ; (77) y y less than 10 c, i.e. SMPPs are slow waves. (3) (3) (z d ) 2 2 E (z) = i E (d) e : (78) z y (2) Examples of spatial profiles of SMPP modes are shown (1) (2) in Fig. 3(b). As can be seen from the figure, in the Here and are defined in Eqs. (43). case of TE-polarized wave E (0) > E (d), so the field y y Using the same boundary condition equations as those is mainly concentrated nearby of the antiferromagnet in Eqs. (55)-(58) adapted for the TM polarization we ob- surface. From the comparison of lines A, B, and C in tain the linear homogeneous system of equations in the Fig. 3(b) it is possible to conclude that higher graphene form ! ! ! doping level leads to a stronger localization of the elec- (2) (2) E (d) 0 sinh(d ) tromagnetic field in the vicinity of the antiferromagnet = ; (79) (2) M 0 E (0) surface. 21 (2) y sinh(d ) 2 9 where 1 1 M = + ; (80) (2) (1) tanh(d ) 1 1  (!) M = + : (81) (2) (2) tanh(d ) i!" 2 0 Consequently, the dispersion relation can be repre- sented as M M = 0 : (82) 21 12 (2) sinh (d ) B. Undressed SPP: the d ! 1 limit For infinite separation d ! 1 between the graphene monolayer and the antiferromagnet the dispersion rela- tion becomes: 2  (!) 1 1 + = 0: (83) (2) (2) (1) i!" Setting equal to zero the first term in brackets in Eq. (83) yields the dispersion relation of the SPPs in a free– standing graphene monolayer, Figure 4. (a,b) Dispersion relations of TM-polarized SPMP in the graphene-antiferromagnet structure with E = 0:03 eV ! 2i! (2) = k = : (84) [solid blue lines in panel (a)], E = 0:1 eV [solid orange lines c (!) in panel (b)], and E = 0:3 eV [solid green lines in panel (b)]. For comparison, the SPP dispersion relation in bare This dispersion curve is shown in Fig.4(a) for E = 0:03 graphene layer (with E = 0:03 eV) is shown in panel (a) by eV by solid pink line (this small Fermi energy is chosen for solid pink line and the dashed black line corresponds to the clarity of the figure). At low frequencies the dispersion bare photon, ! = ck, while the horizontal dash-and-dotted relation (84) can be expressed as line corresponds to the AFMR frequency, ! = . (c) Spatial profiles of the electric fields, corresponding to SPMP modes with E = 0:03 eV and ck= = 1:18 (green line A and orange F 0 ! = ck (ck) : (85) 2 2 8 E line C) and ck= = 2:0 (blue line B and black line D). AF region is shadowed and graphene is at z = 0. The field pro- As a consequence, the dispersion curve (85) appears files are normalized to have the same magnitude on graphene. slightly below the light line. (d) Group velocity v = d!=dk (in dimensionless units v =c) g g of the SPMP low-frequency [! (k), solid lines] and high- The second term in brackets in Eq. (83) is always pos- frequency [! (k), dashed lines] modes with E = 0:03 eV + F itive, so that it does not provide additional modes. This (blue lines), E = 0:1 eV (orange lines), and E = 0:4 eV F F situation, however changes when d is finite. (green lines). Other parameters of the structure are the same as those in Fig. 3. C. SPP dressed by the antiferromagnet point of the spectrum at AFMR frequency, i.e. ! (k ) = + + We now consider the effect of a finite value of d in [point C in Fig 4(a)]. Eq. (82). We plot the spectrum of this hybrid modes – The strong enhancement of the density of states of the SPMPs [solid blue lines in Fig. 4]. We find that it consists SPP at the bare (non-polaritonic) AFMR frequency is a of two branches ! (k) and ! (k) with an anti-crossing distinctive feature of the SPMPs, which are hybrid mode between them [see inset in Fig. 4], which takes place formed by the SPPs and the bare magnons. The magni- in the vicinity of the AFMR frequency, ! = . Away tude of the SPMP mode is quantified by: from the AFMR frequency ! 7 , both modes follow the dispersion of the graphene SPP [like points A and D in Fig 4(a)]. In the vicinity of the antiferromagnetic 1. Absence of the energy gap between two branches, resonance the lower mode approaches asymptotically the since ! = is both the maximum energy of the AFMR frequency as k ! 1 [alike point B in Fig 4(a), lower branch, and the minimum point of the upper i.e., ! (1) = ], and the other one has the starting branch; 0 10 2. Presence of the infinite gap in momentum space at 1. They are a mixture of spin excitations (magnon), AFMR frequency = ! (k ) = ! (1). This charged excitations (plasmon) and electromagnetic 0 + + can be inferred by group velocities of upper and field (photon). The first term in the names that we lower branches, shown in Fig. 4(d); attributed to these hybrid polaritons indicate the condensed matter excitation that primarily inter- 3. The asymmetry of the decay of the E component cats with the field; it also determines its polariza- at two sides of the graphene sheet. tion (TE or TM). The electromagnetic field is, for all modes, predomi- 2. They are extremely non-local, as they reside simul- nantly concentrated nearby the graphene layer. The dis- taneously at the graphene and the AF surface. As tribution of the electric field depends strongly on the mo- a rule of thumb, the electromagnetic coupling be- mentum k and the SPMP branch. In Fig. 4(c) we show tween these two layers survives as long as their sep- E (z), in units of E (d), for 4 different SPMP modes, la- y y aration d is smaller than the wavelength of the EM belled with A,B,C and D, shown in Fig. 4(a). Modes A field at the relevant frequencies. Therefore, it sur- and D lie away from the anti-crossing of the branches and vives to distances way above above 500 nanometers. have a marked surface-plasmon character: their decay is the same at both sides (z < d and z > d) of graphene, 3. Their properties can be tuned by changing the car- and their profile almost does not change at the AF surface rier density in graphene. (z = 0). In contrast, modes B and C with frequencies The recently discovered two-dimensional magnetic ma- nearby the AFMR frequency are asymmetric and change terials [23–27] and the fabrication of Van der Waals radically at the AF surface. heterostructures integrating 2D magnetic crystals with The evolution of the group velocity of the two branches as a function of k, for three values of E , shown in Fig. graphene and other non-magnetic 2D crystals [28–34] opens up the possibility of observing the same effects dis- 4(d), shows very clearly that the hybrid SPMP modes cussed in this work but in the context of van der Waals are combining the dispersive graphene SPP with a non- heterostructures. If the antiferromagnet is also metal- dispersive mode with ! = . As the carrier density in lic, then for frequencies below the plasma frequency, we graphene is varied, and thereby E , SPMP dispersion is would have a system exhibiting both negative permit- changed, and as a result, so is the value of k at which the tivity and permeability functions. This material would anticrossing takes place. present intrinsic negative refraction. In addition, the proximity of a graphene layer could be used for tuning VI. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS the electromagnetic properties of the material. The prospects opened by 2D materials allow to envi- sion many different arrangement of these systems leading In this work we have investigated the electromagnetic to a new class of metamaterials with tunable electromag- properties of an antiferromagnetic insulator in the prox- netic properties promoted by the existence of magnetic imity of a graphene sheet. We have found two new types order. of hybrid polaritons that combine the electromagnetic field with the magnetization in the magnetic material and the free carrier response of Dirac electrons in graphene: ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 1. A TE-polarized surface magnon-plasmon polariton (SMPP), propagating perpendicular to the direc- Y. B., M. V. and N. M. R. P. acknowledge sup- tion of staggerred magnetization in the AF. The port from the European Commission through the project group velocity of this mode becomes negative as "Graphene- Driven Revolutions in ICT and Beyond" jE j is ramped up, resulting in a collective mode (Ref. No. 785219), and the Portuguese Foundation in the AF surface whose propagation direction can for Science and Technology (FCT) in the framework be steered upon gating the graphene layer, located of the Strategic Financing UID/FIS/04650/2013. Ad- at a distance of a few hundred nanometers away. ditionally, N. M. R. P. acknowledges COMPETE2020, PORTUGAL2020, FEDER and the Portuguese Founda- 2. A TM-polarized surface plasmon-magnon polari- tion for Science and Technology (FCT) through project ton (SPMP), propagating along the staggerred PTDC/FIS-NAN/3668/2013 and FEDER and the por- magnetization direction, which hybdridizes the tuguese Foundation for Science and Technology (FCT) surface-plasmon polariton in graphene and the bare through project POCI-01-0145-FEDER-028114. G. A. magnons at the AF. Farias acknowledge support from the Conselho Nacional In both instances, a quantized theory of this new po- de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico (CNPq) laritons implies a new type of hybrid collective modes of Brazil. J. F.-R. acknowledge financial support that combine of surface plasmons in graphene, magnons from FCT for the P2020-PTDC/FIS-NAN/4662/2014, in the antiferromagnets and the photon field. These new the P2020-PTDC/FIS-NAN/3668/2014 and the UTAP- collective excitations have very exotic properties: EXPL/NTec/0046/2017 projects, as well as Generali- 11 tat Valenciana funding Prometeo2017/139 and MINECO owing the Eq.(A3). The components of the respective Spain (Grant No. MAT2016-78625-C2). electric field can be defined from Eq. (A1) (!) 0 a E = H (A9) Appendix A: Transverse bulk waves [u cos ' cos  + u sin  u sin ' cos ] : x y z Let us imagine that antiferromagnetic medium charac- terized by the magnetic permeability tensor (1) occupies Notice that in this representation the electric field is per- all the space 1 < z < 1. In this case wave propa- pendicular to magnetic field, E ? H, what follows from gation is governed by Maxwell equations (7), which solu- the scalar product E H = 0. tions we will seek in the form of travelling waves E (r; t) = Eq. (68) have two solution for ! – acoustic ! and op- E exp(ikri!t), H(r; t) = H exp(ikri!t), propagating tical ! modes in arbitrary direction k with amplitudes of electromag- netic field E, H. Under this assumption, jointly with 2 2 2 2 ! = f (k) f (k) c k the constitutive relations D(r; t) = " E exp(ikr i!t), B(r; t) =   ^ (!) H exp(ikri!t) Maxwell equations (7) will be rewritten as 2 2 2 2 ! = f (k) + f (k) c k k H = !" E; (A1) with k E = !  ^ (!) H; (A2) 2 2 2 c k + ik E = 0; (A3) 0 2 f (k) = + : (A10) ik  ^ (!) H = 0: (A4) This is dissimilar to the case of a metal described by a Notice that in this Appendix we omit index j for brevity. Drude optical response, where only one transverse bulk If we apply operator k to Eq. (A1) and use Eq. (A2), mode exists. Spectra of these two bulk TM-polarized we have magnon-polariton modes are depicted in Fig. 2 by dashed k (k H) = k (k H) k H red lines. The spectrum of the acoustic mode starts at zero frequency and in at long-wavelength limit k ! 0 is =  ^ (!) H: (A5) described by the approximate expression as For the transverse waves the wavevector k should be or- thogonal to the magnetic field H, i.e. (k H) = 0. Fur- !  kc : (A11) 2 2 + 2 ther this wave will be referred to as TM-polarized bulk 0 s polariton. Simultaneously with Eq. (A4) this condition In short-wavelength limit k ! 1 the dispersion curve of can be satisfied only if H  0. In this case the Helmholtz acoustic mode asymptotically approaches the frequency equation (A5) for components of the magnetic field H as and H will be rewritten as : (A12) a 0 2 2 (ck) k  (!) H = 0 = H ; (A6) x 1 x It should be underlined that the spectrum of the acoustic mode is located at the right of the light line ! = ck k  (!) H = 0 = H : (A7) z 1 z (depicted by dashed black line in Fig. 3). This fact means that phase velocity of the acoustic mode, ! =k is smaller For nonzero amplitudes this system of equation will than the velocity of light in vacuum c for all values of the have solution only when condition = 0 is met, thus wavevector k. Eq. (68) determines the dispersion relation of bulk waves. The optical mode spectrum starts at the frequency If the wavevector is represented in spherical coordinates 2 2 + 2 , and in the limit k ! 0 its approximate dis- 0 s as persion relation can be represented as k =  (!) (u cos ' sin  + u cos x y q 2 2 2 c c k + 2 + ; (A13) 0 s +u sin ' sin ) ; (A8) 2 3=2 z ( + 2 0 s the respective components of the magnetic field will be while in the limit k ! 1 the optical mode’s approximate H = H (u sin ' + u cos '). In these equations  is x z dispersion relation is the polar angle between the y-axis and wavevector, and ' is the azimuthal angle in plane xz. 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Published: Feb 2, 2019

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