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High Impedance Fault Detection and Isolation in Power Distribution Networks using Support Vector Machines

High Impedance Fault Detection and Isolation in Power Distribution Networks using Support Vector... This paper proposes an accurate High Impedance Fault (HIF) detection and isolation scheme in a power distribution network. The proposed schemes utilize the data available from voltage and current sensors. The technique employs multiple algorithms consisting of Principal Component Analysis, Fisher Discriminant Analysis, Binary and Multiclass Support Vector Machine for detection and identification of the high impedance fault. These data driven techniques have been tested on IEEE 13-node distribution network for detection and identification of high impedance faults with broken and unbroken conductor. Further, the robustness of machine learning techniques has also been analysed by examining their performance with variation in loads for di erent faults. Simulation results for di erent faults at various locations have shown that proposed methods are fast and accurate in diagnosing high impedance faults. Multiclass Support Vector Machine gives the best result to detect and locate High Impedance Fault accurately. It ensures reliability, security and dependability of the distribution network. Keywords: Fisher Discriminant Analysis, High Impedance Fault, Principal Component Analysis, Support Vector Machines 1. Introduction (Jones, 1996). Detection of HIFs helps in prognostic mainte- nance in power distribution system. High impedance faults in- Detection of high impedance faults poses a highly challeng- volve arcing which makes fault current asymmetric and nonlin- ing problem because of the random, asymmetric and nonlin- ear. As a result of arcing, HIFs involve high frequency com- ear nature of high impedance fault (HIF) current. Most of the ponents similar to load and capacitor switching which makes time, these faults cannot be detected and isolated by conven- detection much more dicult (Sahoo and Baran, 2014). tional over-current schemes, because magnitude of fault current Previous research on diagnosis of HIFs was focused on lab- is considerably lower than nominal load current (Jones, 1996). based staged fault studies. However, with the advancement High impedance faults typically occur when an energised in technology and better understanding of features of HIFs, conductor comes in contact with ground through any high impe- the focus has shifted towards simulations and software studies dance object such as dry asphalt, wet sand, dry grass and sod (Brahma, 2013). etc. which limits the flow of current towards ground (Jones, Due to its critical nature, researchers from both industry and 1996). Timely detection of high impedance faults is neces- academia have proposed various techniques to detect HIFs in sary for ecient, reliable and safe operation of power systems. distribution networks. Majority of the studies were reported as Probability of occurrence of high impedance fault in distribu- early as 1980s and 1990s, but the simulation methods and ad- tion networks is more than in transmission network because dis- vanced detection techniques are still being developed and pro- tribution feeders are more likely to come in contact with high posed. HIF detection methods can be broadly classified into impedance objects like trees etc. However, in underground ca- time domain algorithms, frequency domain algorithms (Lima bles high impedance faults are caused by insulation degrada- et al., 2018), hybrid algorithms (Samantaray et al., 2008) and tion that exposes the energised conductor to high impedance knowledge-based systems (Etemadi and Sanaye-Pasand, 2008). objects (Bakar et al., 2014). High impedance faults occur at K. Zoric and M. B. Djuric presented a method to detect voltage level of 15KV or below in most of the cases. Mag- high impedance fault based on harmonic analysis of voltage nitude of HIF current is independent of the conventional short signals (Zoric et al., 1997). James Stoupis introduced a new circuit fault current level (Bishop, 1985). relaying scheme manufactured by ABB in the area of artificial High impedance faults are extremely dicult to detect and neural networks (Stoupis et al., 2004). Sedighi proposed two isolate by conventional protection schemes, because fault cur- methods based on soft computing for detection of HIF (Sedighi rent magnitude is much lower than nominal current. According et al., 2005). Mark Adamiak proposed signature based high to report by Power System Relaying Committee (PSRC), only impedance fault diagnoses which involves expert system pat- 17% of HIFs can be detected by conventional relaying schemes Preprint submitted to Journal of King Saud University - Engineering Sciences September 25, 2019 arXiv:1909.10583v1 [eess.SY] 9 Aug 2019 tern recognition on harmonic energy levels in arcing current on any embedded hardware for real time prototyping and HIF (Adamiak et al., 2006). detection. S.R. Samantaray presented an intelligent approach to de- In proposed method, data obtained from voltage and cur- tect high impedance faults in distribution systems (Samantaray, rent sensors is fed to three fault detection algorithms i.e., Prin- 2012). In (Zanjani et al., 2012), authors have proposed a new cipal Components Analysis (PCA), Fischer Discriminant Anal- approach to detect HIF based on PMU (Phasor Measurement ysis (FDA) and Support Vector Machines (SVM). PCA extracts Unit). F. V. Lopes presented a method to diagnose HIF in smart principal components of data and use them for fault detection. distribution systems (Lopes et al., 2013). Authors in (Brahma, FDA reduces the data to a lower dimension to maximise dis- 2013; Hou, 2007) presented a method to detect HIF based on tance among various classes for increased accuracy. Binary mathematical morphology. A new model for high impedance class SVM is used only for detection of HIFs. To determine faults has been present in (Torres et al., 2014). Results of this type and location of fault multiclass SVM is deployed to signal model are quite closer to what is observed in staged faults. This the presence of an incipient or sudden high impedance fault. research activity also detected HIF using harmonic analysis of Once the fault is detected, the faulty system can be isolated current waveform. from the network by issuing a trip signal to traditional over cur- Recenlty, Kavi presented a method to detect HIF in Single rent relays in substation. The speed and accuracy of proposed Wire Earth Return (SEWR) system (Kavi et al., 2016). Sekar method is comparable to conventional fault detection of over- and Mohanty proposed fuzzy rule base approach for high impe- current faults. dance fault detection in distribution systems (Sekar and Mo- The rest of research paper is organised as follows. Sec- hanty, 2018). They present a filter-based morphology gradient tion II details characteristics and features of high impedance (MG) to di erentiate non-HIF events from HIF events. W. C. faults. Theoretical foundation for data driven techniques is laid Santos presented a transient based approach to identify HIF in down in Section III. Proposed techniques have been tested on power distribution systems (Santos et al., 2017) . In (Ferdowsi IEEE 13-node test system and results are discussed in Section et al., 2017), real time complexity measurement (RCM) based IV. Section V concludes the research. approach is used to detect HIF. In (Ghaderi et al., 2016) HIF de- tection techniques are evaluated and compared with each. With 2. High Impedance Fault Characteristics the advancement in technology, the trend has been shifted to- wards smart grids and smart distribution systems. Smart dis- In this section, prominent features of high impedance faults tribution systems include measurements (such as voltage and are described. To obtain training data from simulation, a fault current) at each node that helped to discover and develop digi- model is simulated in Simulink and training data is obtained tal signal processing based fault detection techniques (Lai et al., from voltage and current sensors installed in the network. 2005; Elkalashy et al., 2007; Sheelvant, 2015). Prior studies have helped to reveal many of the hidden char- 2.1. Properties of High Impedance Faults acteristics of High Impedance Faults. But the major drawback Arcing is a prominent phenomena in HIFs. The arc is formed of aforementioned techniques is that they are not capable of de- due to air gap between energised conductor and high impedance tecting all types of high impedance faults. Furthermore, active object. Arc ignition occurs when magnitude of voltage is higher methods of HIF detection use signal injection which deterio- than air gap breakdown voltage. Consequently, arc extinction rates the power quality. Some methods employ data gathered occurs when voltage is lower than breakdown voltage (Ghaderi by PMUs, which are quite expensive and also many distribution et al., 2016). The value of break down voltage changes during systems currently don’t deploy PMUs. Another disadvantage is each cycle. Thus, in every cycle of voltage, the HIF current that most of the proposed methods use a lot of computing power includes two arc re-ignitions and two arc extinctions. There- and thus can not be implemented on an embedded system as a fore, current conducting path changes during each cycle which portable numerical relay. changes the magnitude of HIF current making it non-linear, The motivation for this research work lies in manifold short- also HIF current is intermittent in nature (Ghaderi et al., 2016). comings of the prior research. The proposed method is compu- Some of the typical features of high impedance faults are as tationally less rigorous, so it can be implemented on an embed- follows: ded system as a numerical relay. The method ensures power quality as it does not inject any signal into power system for Non linearity: Voltage-current characteristics are highly HIF detection. The technique developed can detect all types nonlinear due to change in current conducting path (Chen of HIF i.e., broken and unbroken conductor HIFs and can lo- et al., 2013). cate the faulty section of network. Furthermore, input data is Asymmetric nature of HIF current: Peak values of cur- gathered using CTs and PTs which are already deployed in all rent are di erent in positive and negative half cycle due distribution networks, so no additional hardware installation is to the presence of varying break down voltage (Ghaderi needed for data acquisition. The proposed method is accurate et al., 2016; Biswal, 2017). and highly reliable as it can distinguish load switching from faults, and can also detect and isolate multiple high impedance Intermittent nature: HIF current is not steady due to faults in the power network. The training model used for de- intermittent nature of arc (Mai et al., 2012). tecting faults is of low order and can easily be implemented 2 Fig. 1: The selected HIF model (Brahma, 2013) Build up: Current magnitude progressively increases till it reaches it maximum value (Biswal, 2017) Fig. 2: Arc current and voltage during HIF Randomness: Magnitude of HIF current and its shape changes with time due change in impedance of conduct- ing path (Sykulski, 2006). Low and high frequency components: HIF current in- cludes low frequency components due to non-linearity of HIF. Additionally, HIF current also contains high fre- quency components due to intermittent nature of arc (Ghaderi et al., 2016). 2.2. Simulation of High Impedance Fault To obtain training data from simulation, appropriate model of HIF is required which would show real behaviour of an HIF. This paper utilises an HIF model shown in Fig. 1, connected Fig. 3: The v-i characteristics of HIF between any of phase and ground (Brahma, 2013). The model is simulated in MATLAB, the parameters of model are tuned according to test feeder. In this HIF model, two diodes D and D are connected p n V = 1:0 kv; with 10% variation to two DC voltage sources V and V , respectively. The DC p n V = 0:5 kv; with 10% variation sources have di erent magnitude and their magnitude randomly R ; R = 1000 ; with random variation p n changes around V and V after every 0.11 ms. This models the p n asymmetric nature of arc current and intermediate arc extinc- The above model is simulated in Matlab . There are two tion. steps involved in modelling HIF; in first step, variable DC volt- To model the randomness in duration of arc extinction in age sources are modelled using controlled voltages source; in high impedance fault, voltage polarity also changes at every second step, variable resistances are modelled using controlled sampling instant (Brahma, 2013). When the instantaneous value current sources. First part is implemented using only random of phase voltage is greater than V , current flows towards ground, number generator, constant block, and controlled voltage source when the instantaneous value of phase voltage is less than V , is used to obtain varying DC voltages. Second step involves current reserves its direction, when the instantaneous value of a build-up series R-L circuit and a sinusoidal signal of 60 Hz. phase voltage is between V , and V , no current flows. In order p n Both of these generate an exponentially growing sine wave. The to incorporate varying arc resistance, the model of HIF also in- sine wave is multiplied with a random number of amplitude 1 cludes two variable resistances, R and R , such that values of p n and variance of 0.12 to obtain a randomly varying resistance. these resistances vary randomly after every 0.11 ms. Fig. 2 shows arc current and voltage waveforms obtained The parameters used for HIF model with IEEE 13-node test as a result of modelling HIF in Simulink, using HIF model of feeder in Simulink are: Fig. 1. It is clear that the arc current is small, random, asym- metric, and nonlinear in nature. The voltage waveform in Fig. 2 3 also shows the random behaviour. Fig. 3 shows the v-i char- acteristics of HIF, the v-i characteristics of HIF and the cur- rent waveform are quite similar to those got from a staged fault (Brahma, 2013). 3. Theoretical Foundation Data driven techniques are the perfect candidate for fault diagnoses in large systems where enough amount of data is available. Principal Component Analysis, Fischer Discrimi- nant Analysis, and Support Vector Machines are widely used for addressing diagnosis problems due to their simplicity and eciency in processing large amount of data. Here the theoret- ical basis for applied algorithms is given. 3.1. Principal Component Analysis Fig. 4: Flowchart for oine fault computation using PCA Principal Component analysis is linear dimensional reduc- tion technique, it projects higher dimensional data into lower dimensions while keeping significant features. PCA has ability Once the data is projected in lower dimensions, Hotteling’s T to retain maximum variation that is possible in lower dimen- statistics is used for fault detection. Hotteling’s T - statistics sions such that transformed features are linear combination of can be calculated as (Jamil et al., 2015; Chiang et al., 2000), primary features. In reduced dimensions, di erent statistical 2 T 1 T T = x P P x (3) plots such as T or Q-charts are utilised for visualisation of dif- ferent trends. PCA is known as powerful tool for feature extrac- where  is the diagonal matrix of first a singular values, P is tion and data reduction in fault detection techniques because of the loading vector matrix corresponding to first a singular val- simplicity and its ability to process large amount of data (Jamil ues. The Hotteling’s T - statistics (3) is scaled squared 2-norm et al., 2015). of observation space X, measures systematic variations of the Application of PCA for fault diagnoses consists of three process, and if there is violations, it will indicate that system- steps; first of all, loading vectors (transformation vectors) are atic variations are out of control. If is the level of significance, calculated by performing oine computations on training data; the threshold of T statistics can be calculated as (Chiang et al., in second step, the loading vectors are utilised to transform on- 2000), line data (higher dimensional data) into lower dimensions; in 2 m(n 1)(n + 1) third step, test statistics such as T are used to detect fault (Jamil T = F (m; n m) (4) n(n m) et al., 2015). Let us assume that a training set of m process variables, with Where F (m; n m) is known as F-distribution with m and (n- set of n observations, is normalised to unit variance and zero m) degree of freedom (Chiang et al., 2000). Essential condition mean by subtracting each process variable by its mean and di- for fault detection occurs if Hotteling’s T - statistics exceeds its viding by standard deviation of data, and is shown in the form of threshold value, that is, nm input matrix X2R . With the help of singular value decompo- 2 2 T  T Fault f ree case sition of input data matrix X, loading vectors or transformation 2 2 T > T sFault case vectors are calculated. A complete flowchart for oine and online computation of the X = UV (1) PCA algorithm for fault detection is shown in Fig. 4 and 5, 1 n respectively. In equation (1), U and V are unitary matrices, and  is called diagonal matrix and its singular values are in decreasing order. 3.2. Fisher discriminant analysis The transformation vectors are orthonormal vectors of matrix Fisher discriminant analysis is one of the most powerful mm th V 2 R . Training set’s variance projected along the u col- methods for dimensionality reduction. In case of fault detec- umn of V is equal to  . In PCA, loading vectors or trans- tion, PCA gives very good results. However, it has poor prop- formation vectors related to a largest singular value are kept to erties of fault classification because it does not consider infor- capture large data variation in lower dimensions. Let us assume mation (variance) among di erent classes of data during com- ma mm that P 2 R is the matrix with first a column of V 2 R , putation of loading vectors (Jamil et al., 2015). FDA consid- and projection of observed data X into reduced dimensions are ers information among di erent classes of data, so it is more incorporated in the score matrix T is given as, favourable for fault classification. It determines a set of trans- formation vectors, known as FDA vectors. FDA vectors max- T = X P (2) imise the information (distance) among di erent classes of data, 4 Where  is generalised eigenvalue representing the extent of separability between classes and  are respective eigenvec- tors. Equation (5) shows optimisation problem that ensures minimum scatter within class and maximum scatter between di erent data classes. This feature helps to classify faults. In order to project online data into lower dimensional space, a ma- (mq1) trix V 2 R with q-1 FDA vectors is defined as, such data (q1) projected data z 2 R is given by z = V x (10) i i For fault detection Hotteling’s T - statistics is used (Yin et al., 2012), given by 2 T T 1 T T = x V (V S V ) V x (11) a k a k a a Fig. 5: Flowchart for online fault computation using PCA Where a shows the number of non-zero eigenvalues. For a given level of significance , threshold for Hotteling’s T - statistics is given by: while minimising information within each class in projected space. FDA tries to centralise di erent data classes and fea- a(n 1)(n + 1) T = F (a; n a) (12) ture recognition rates of FDA is better than PCA. According to n(n 1) (Adil et al., 2016), performance of FDA for fault detection and 2 2 T  T Fault f ree case classification is quite better than that of PCA. 2 2 T > T Fault case The procedure to implement FDA is similar to PCA. First of all, FDA vectors are computed using training data, then these For fault classification, the discriminant function is used as given FDA vectors are utilised to transform online data into lower di- below: mensional space. Finally, a discriminant function isolates the 1 1 T T 1 T fault. In FDA training data, both normal and faulty data is used g (x) = (x x ) V ( V S V ) V (x x ) k k q k q k q q 2 n 1 for computation of FDA vectors, however, in PCA only nor- 1 1 mal data is used for computation of loading vectors (Adil et al., +ln(q ) ln[det( V S V )] (13) i k q 2 n 1 2016; Chiang et al., 2000). In order to detect fault with the help of FDA, Hotteling’s T - statistics is used. In above equation, g k (x) is the discriminant function associ- Let us assume that a training set of m process variables, ated with class k, provided a data vector x2R , online data is with set of n observations, is shown in the form of input matrix associated with class i provided that the discriminant function nm X2R . Consider q as number of classes in di erent faults and belonging to i h class is maximum for a fault in class i, can be n is number of observations in k h class, let x be the transpose k i expressed as, of i row of matrix X. The transformation vector  is computed th g (x) > g (x) (14) i k using training data such that following optimisation is solved. T A complete flowchart for oine training of the FDA algorithm J () = arg max (5) F DA ,0 is shown in Fig. 6. Where S w shows within class scatter matrix given by 3.3. Support Vector Machines (SVM) SVM is a well-known data driven technique used for detec- S =  S (6) w k k=1 tion and classification of faults due to its generalisation abil- With ity and being less susceptible to the curse of dimensionality (Burges, 1997). For the first time, Support vector machines n T S =  (x x )(x x ) (7) k i k i k x 2 i k were used by Vapnik (Zhang, 2010). It is one of the new ma- chine learning tools for classification of linear and nonlinear and the mean of kth class x =  x similarly S is be- k x 2x i b i k n k data. SVM is a binary classifier that maximises the margin be- tween class scatter matrix given by tween two data classes through a hyper-plane as shown in Fig. 7. SVMs maximise the margin near separating hyperplane. The S =  (x x )(x x ) (8) b i k i k decision of separation is fully identified by the support vectors. With x shows the combined (total) mean vector given by x = Solution of SVM is obtained through solution of quadratic pro- 1 n x it is stated that solution to above optimisation problem gramming. n i=1 is identical to eigenvalue decomposition problem (Ding, 2014), In SVM, a discriminant function is used to di erentiate dif- ferent classes of data given by: S  =  S  (9) f (x) = w x + b (15) b h h w h 5 Fig. 7: Linear separating hyperplane (Nayak, 1998) Fig. 6: Flowchart for oine training of FDA Fig. 8: Mapping of data to feature space (Nayak, 1998) Where b, the bias, x, the data points, and w, the weighting According to Representer theorem, w can be written as linear vector, are obtained through training data. In two-dimensional combination of input vectors. space, the discriminant function is a line, in three-dimensional w =  x (19) j j space, the discriminant function is a plane, and in n-dimensional j=1 space, the discriminant function is a hyperplane. SVM gener- Thus ates the optimal separating hyperplane by calculating the value T N T of bias, weighting vector in such way that maximum margin f (x) = w x + b = b +  x x (20) l=1 l is achieved. The points in training set with least perpendicular All the dot products can be replaced with distance to the hyperplane are known as support vectors. The margin of the optimal separator can be defined as width of sep- k(c; d) = c d (21) aration between support vectors. Optimisation problem: f (x ) = 2 = 2r (16) N N min a; b  k(x ; x ) + C  (22) j l j k j j;l=1 j=1 3.3.1. The Kernel Trick (Feature Space) Where  j>0 The cases in which training data is not linearly separable in y  k(x ; x ) + b  1  (23) j l l j j l=1 the original space using above methods, then, this kind of data can be mapped to a higher-dimensional space which makes the In order to test the pattern, we use: data separable (Nayak, 1998), as shown in Fig. 8. f (x) = b +  k(x ; x) (24) l l A kernel function is a type of function that corresponds to l=1 an inner product in the higher dimensional space. For example, Euclidean dot product can be substituted with dot product in if data is mapped to feature space through a transformation  : feature space “”, which will permit nonlinear classification. x ! '(x), then, the inner product results: k(c; d) = (c) (d) (25) K(xi; x j) = (xi)T(x j) (17) k(c; d) is known as kernel function and corresponding SVM is There are di erent types of kernels, such as, polynomial, linear, called kernelized SVM. This type of SVM can solve the issue Radial Basis Function (RBF) etc. The discriminant function of of classification of not linear separable data. Steps involved in SVM, can be written as: implementation of kernelized SVM are: f (x) = w x + b (18) 6 Fig. 10: Projection of training data and testing in two dimensional space for PCA Fig. 9: IEEE 13-node Distribution Test Feeder Step 1: Input data is normalised. Step 2: Training of SVM. Step 2.1: Selection of kernel function. Step 2.2: Selection of kernel parameter. Step 2.3: Optimisation of penalty factor (C). Step 2.4: Cross validation. Step 3: Classification of SVM test data. 3.3.2. Multiclass SVM Fig. 11: The results of Hotteling’s T statistics to detect HIF Binary class SVM can be used for fault detection, but it can- not be used for fault classification. However in practical cases, discrimination of more than two classes is required, hence, mul- data and 100 samples of faulty data. PCA algorithm has been ticlass pattern recognition is often required in real world prob- applied on training data and 29 principal components are ob- lems (Xue, 2014). In majority of cases, multiclass pattern recog- tained. Out of 29 principal components only 5 principal com- ponents have been retained, the decision is made on the basis of nition problems are decomposed into series of binary problems total variance captured by these 5 principal components. The such that binary pattern recognition techniques can easily be value of , as mentioned in (4), is taken 0.001. As we have applied in practical cases. multiclass SVM algorithms such 1:6983 retained 5 principal components so ( ) = 98% of total vari- as one-versus-one, one-versus-all, can be applied be applied to 1:72 ance has been captured by first five principal components. classify more than two faults. Fig. 10 shows projection of training data and testing in two dimensional space. It can be observed that first two components 4. Application of Data Driven Techniques to Diagnose HIF capture most of variation in higher dimensional data. Fig. 11 shows the results of Hotteling’s T statistics to detect HIF after HIF is introduced at di erent positions and di erent phase applying (3.3) on test data. It can be seen that normal data conductors of IEEE 13-node test feeder as shown in Fig. 9. In (first 100 samples) lies below threshold value of T statistics, data structure, data is generated from Simulink model of test where threshold value is 22.0108. This threshold value was feeder. There are 29 variables of singles phase, two phase and found using significance level of 0.1% and confidence region three phase voltages of 13-node test feeder. Data has been of 99%. placed in input matrix in such a way that each column of in- PCA can successfully detect high impedance fault as shown put matrix represents voltage and each row of input matrix rep- in Fig. 11. In some cases, it is required to classify di erent resents number of observations. There were 400 observations types of HIFs such as broken conductor and unbroken con- recorded for bus voltages, first 100 observations correspond to ductor HIFs at di erent locations of feeder. For this purpose, normal data, while other 300 observations correspond to three High impedance faults at three di erent locations are analysed. HIF locations at di erent positions of test feeder. Fig. 12 shows plot of Hotteling’s T statistics to detect HIFs at three di erent locations. Results show that PCA can suc- 4.1. Detection of HIF using PCA and Hotteling’s T statistics cessfully detect these three HIFs. Only 5 principal components For diagnoses of HIF using PCA, training data consisting are retained such that (1.6983/1.72)=98% of total variance has of 60 samples of normal condition (without fault) has been se- been captured. Fig. 13 shows projection of training data and test lected while testing data is consist of 100 samples of non-faulty 7 Fig. 14: Projection of training data in two dimensional space by FDA Fig. 12: Plot of Hotteling’s T statistics to detect multiple HIFs Fig. 15: Plot of discriminant function for multiple HIF detection using FDA Fig. 13: Projection of training and test data in 2-D space for multiple faults 4.3. Detection of HIF using SVM data in two dimensional space, it can be seen that PCA cannot discriminate between di erent types of HIFs, this is due to the Support vector machine algorithm has been applied for 29- reason that PCA do not consider information among di erent dimensional data without any dimensional reduction technique. classes of data. We can conclude that PCA is suitable for HIF Selection of optimal value of penalty factor is important, this detection but it cannot classify di erent types of HIFs. is done by performing nested 3-fold cross validation in original data. With the help of cross validation, average area under the 4.2. Detection of HIF using FDA curve was computed for 1000 values of penalty factor between 0.1 and 100. After selection of optimal value of C, SVM classi- FDA is applied for detection and isolation of high impedance fiers were trained with optimal penalty factor and validated on faults in power distribution systems. In order to compute FDA training data so that generalisation would be checked. Test data vectors, both normal and faulty data is used, in this work, 60 of HIF was classified by validated SVM classifier. The pre- samples in training data and 40 samples in test data correspond- dicted labels of test data fairly detects the occurrence of fault, ing to each scenario, that is, faulty and non-faulty case. Fig. 14 that is -1 for non-faulty data and +1 for faulty data as shown in shows projection of training data in two-dimensional space by FDA. In second step, after computation of transformation vec- tors (FDA vectors), the discriminant function is used to test on- line data. Fig. 15 shows plot of discriminant function in each category. It can be observed that up to first 30 samples, value of discriminant function corresponding to normal case has max- imum magnitude, which shows that there is no fault in test feeder. Similarly, after 30 samples, value of discriminant func- tion corresponding to fault at position A has maximum magni- tude, which shows that fault at position has occurred. Same is the case with fault at position B and C. Zoomed view of plot is shown in Fig. 16. The above results have shown that FDA can successfully isolate/locate HIF. This technique is very well suited for moni- toring of power distribution systems. Fig. 16: Zoomed view of discriminant function for multiple HIF detection using FDA 8 Fig. 18: Predicted labels of test data using Multiclass–SVM classifier Fig. 17: Classification of an HIF using binary-class SVM Fig. 17. 4.4. Detection and Classification of HIF using M-SVM Binary class SVM can be used for fault detection, but it cannot be used for fault classification. However, in Power dis- tribution systems, discrimination of more than two classes is re- quired, hence, multiclass pattern recognition is often required in monitoring Power distribution systems. Multiclass SVM (M– SVM) classifier is obtained using training of non-fault cases with class label 4, fault at position A with class label 3, fault at position B with class 2, and fault at position C with class Fig. 19: Predicted labels of test data using M–SVM classifier on a 2-D plane 1. In each classifier, during training, a Gaussian Radial Basis Function kernel with a scaling factor, sigma (), of 0.5 and a penalty factor of 10 is used. The tolerance value for Karush- It can be seen that M-SVM can easily classify high impedance Kuhn-Tucker (KKT) condition for the training of data is taken faults at di erent locations with load variation and capacitor as 0.001. The value of regularization parameter, lambda () switching. So, we can conclude that SVM based techniques is 1. Test data is classified using the trained classifiers for 50 can successfully detect and locate HIFs in a Power Distribution observations of each data class and predicted labels were di er- Network. entiated with known data labels. Fig. 18 shows that up to 50 samples, the predicted labels 5. Conclusion belong to normal class data, indicating that there is no fault. After first 50 samples, predicted labels belong to class label 3, In this research paper, high impedance fault detection and indicating that the fault is occurred at position A. After first classification in power distribution systems has been studied us- 100 samples, predicted labels belong to class label 2, indicating ing data driven techniques. Source-diode-resistance model con- that the fault is occurred at position B. similarly, after first 150 sisting of two diodes with opposite polarity connected to DC samples, predicted labels belong to class label 1, indicating that sources is utilised to simulate the high impedance fault. Data the fault is occurred at position C. Similarly, Fig. 19 show the driven techniques including PCA, FDA, and SVM are applied score plot of test data for each class of data. to detect/classify HIFs. PCA along with Hotteling’s T statis- A comparison is presented to evaluate the results of the tics to detect HIFs, it is demonstrated that PCA successfully proposed technique with those from literature and observations detects HIF but it cannot classify HIFs. Compared to that, FDA have been recorded in Table 1. After testing the technique on can also successfully classify/locate the fault. Further supe- 400 test cases, it is found that proposed method is extremely rior results are achieved by M-SVM, fault classification rate of quick and ecient in detecting HIFs. The proposed method is SVM is better than FDA. M-SVM algorithm can detect all types evaluated through the following performance indices: of HIF and is also robust against capacitor and load switching Dependability: Predicted HIF cases/Actual HIF cases. transients in distribution network. Security: Predicted non-HIF cases/Actual non-HIF cases. Table 1 compares the performance indices of the proposed method. It is noted that the proposed method detects all HIF Conflict of Interest faults under various operating conditions and disturbances. Thus, The authors declare no conflict of interest. the proposed method is accurate, reliable and prompt in the de- tection of High Impedance Faults. 9 Table 1: Comparison of performance indices of the proposed M-SVM method with previous techniques Method Security (%) Dependability (%) Wavelet transform (Chen et al., 2016) 68.5 72 Time frequency transform Samantaray et al. (2008) 81.5 98.3 Morphological gradient (Sarlak and Shahrtash, 2011) 96.3 98.3 Mathematical Morphology (Gautam and Brahma, 2012) 100 100 The proposed method (M-SVM) 100 100 References Lima, E.M., dos Santos Junqueira, C.M., Brito, N.S.D., de Souza, B.A., de Almeida Coelho, R., de Medeiros, H.G.M.S., 2018. High impedance Adamiak, M., Wester, C., Thakur, M., Jensen, C., 2006. High impedance fault fault detection method based on the short-time fourier transform. 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IEEE 11, 139. detection of distribution network by phasor measurement units,, Tehran, Kavi, M., Mishra, Y., Vilathgamuwa, D.M., 2016. Detection and identification Iran. pp. 2–3. of high impedance faults in single wire earth return distribution networks,. Zhang, Y.Z.Y., 2010. A New Multi-class Classification Algorithm of Support QLD, Australia, Brisbane. Vector Machine,. Guangzhou, China. Lai, T.M., Snider, L.A., Lo, E., Sutanto, D., 2005. High-impedance fault detec- Zoric, K.J., Djuric, M.B., V, V., 1997. Arcing faults detection on overhead lines tion using discrete wavelet transform and frequency range and rms conver- from the voltage signals. International Journal of Electrical Power & Energy sion,. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER DELIVERY 20, 397–407. Systems 19, 299–303. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Electrical Engineering and Systems Science arXiv (Cornell University)

High Impedance Fault Detection and Isolation in Power Distribution Networks using Support Vector Machines

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1018-3639
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ARCH-3348
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10.1016/j.jksues.2019.07.001
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Abstract

This paper proposes an accurate High Impedance Fault (HIF) detection and isolation scheme in a power distribution network. The proposed schemes utilize the data available from voltage and current sensors. The technique employs multiple algorithms consisting of Principal Component Analysis, Fisher Discriminant Analysis, Binary and Multiclass Support Vector Machine for detection and identification of the high impedance fault. These data driven techniques have been tested on IEEE 13-node distribution network for detection and identification of high impedance faults with broken and unbroken conductor. Further, the robustness of machine learning techniques has also been analysed by examining their performance with variation in loads for di erent faults. Simulation results for di erent faults at various locations have shown that proposed methods are fast and accurate in diagnosing high impedance faults. Multiclass Support Vector Machine gives the best result to detect and locate High Impedance Fault accurately. It ensures reliability, security and dependability of the distribution network. Keywords: Fisher Discriminant Analysis, High Impedance Fault, Principal Component Analysis, Support Vector Machines 1. Introduction (Jones, 1996). Detection of HIFs helps in prognostic mainte- nance in power distribution system. High impedance faults in- Detection of high impedance faults poses a highly challeng- volve arcing which makes fault current asymmetric and nonlin- ing problem because of the random, asymmetric and nonlin- ear. As a result of arcing, HIFs involve high frequency com- ear nature of high impedance fault (HIF) current. Most of the ponents similar to load and capacitor switching which makes time, these faults cannot be detected and isolated by conven- detection much more dicult (Sahoo and Baran, 2014). tional over-current schemes, because magnitude of fault current Previous research on diagnosis of HIFs was focused on lab- is considerably lower than nominal load current (Jones, 1996). based staged fault studies. However, with the advancement High impedance faults typically occur when an energised in technology and better understanding of features of HIFs, conductor comes in contact with ground through any high impe- the focus has shifted towards simulations and software studies dance object such as dry asphalt, wet sand, dry grass and sod (Brahma, 2013). etc. which limits the flow of current towards ground (Jones, Due to its critical nature, researchers from both industry and 1996). Timely detection of high impedance faults is neces- academia have proposed various techniques to detect HIFs in sary for ecient, reliable and safe operation of power systems. distribution networks. Majority of the studies were reported as Probability of occurrence of high impedance fault in distribu- early as 1980s and 1990s, but the simulation methods and ad- tion networks is more than in transmission network because dis- vanced detection techniques are still being developed and pro- tribution feeders are more likely to come in contact with high posed. HIF detection methods can be broadly classified into impedance objects like trees etc. However, in underground ca- time domain algorithms, frequency domain algorithms (Lima bles high impedance faults are caused by insulation degrada- et al., 2018), hybrid algorithms (Samantaray et al., 2008) and tion that exposes the energised conductor to high impedance knowledge-based systems (Etemadi and Sanaye-Pasand, 2008). objects (Bakar et al., 2014). High impedance faults occur at K. Zoric and M. B. Djuric presented a method to detect voltage level of 15KV or below in most of the cases. Mag- high impedance fault based on harmonic analysis of voltage nitude of HIF current is independent of the conventional short signals (Zoric et al., 1997). James Stoupis introduced a new circuit fault current level (Bishop, 1985). relaying scheme manufactured by ABB in the area of artificial High impedance faults are extremely dicult to detect and neural networks (Stoupis et al., 2004). Sedighi proposed two isolate by conventional protection schemes, because fault cur- methods based on soft computing for detection of HIF (Sedighi rent magnitude is much lower than nominal current. According et al., 2005). Mark Adamiak proposed signature based high to report by Power System Relaying Committee (PSRC), only impedance fault diagnoses which involves expert system pat- 17% of HIFs can be detected by conventional relaying schemes Preprint submitted to Journal of King Saud University - Engineering Sciences September 25, 2019 arXiv:1909.10583v1 [eess.SY] 9 Aug 2019 tern recognition on harmonic energy levels in arcing current on any embedded hardware for real time prototyping and HIF (Adamiak et al., 2006). detection. S.R. Samantaray presented an intelligent approach to de- In proposed method, data obtained from voltage and cur- tect high impedance faults in distribution systems (Samantaray, rent sensors is fed to three fault detection algorithms i.e., Prin- 2012). In (Zanjani et al., 2012), authors have proposed a new cipal Components Analysis (PCA), Fischer Discriminant Anal- approach to detect HIF based on PMU (Phasor Measurement ysis (FDA) and Support Vector Machines (SVM). PCA extracts Unit). F. V. Lopes presented a method to diagnose HIF in smart principal components of data and use them for fault detection. distribution systems (Lopes et al., 2013). Authors in (Brahma, FDA reduces the data to a lower dimension to maximise dis- 2013; Hou, 2007) presented a method to detect HIF based on tance among various classes for increased accuracy. Binary mathematical morphology. A new model for high impedance class SVM is used only for detection of HIFs. To determine faults has been present in (Torres et al., 2014). Results of this type and location of fault multiclass SVM is deployed to signal model are quite closer to what is observed in staged faults. This the presence of an incipient or sudden high impedance fault. research activity also detected HIF using harmonic analysis of Once the fault is detected, the faulty system can be isolated current waveform. from the network by issuing a trip signal to traditional over cur- Recenlty, Kavi presented a method to detect HIF in Single rent relays in substation. The speed and accuracy of proposed Wire Earth Return (SEWR) system (Kavi et al., 2016). Sekar method is comparable to conventional fault detection of over- and Mohanty proposed fuzzy rule base approach for high impe- current faults. dance fault detection in distribution systems (Sekar and Mo- The rest of research paper is organised as follows. Sec- hanty, 2018). They present a filter-based morphology gradient tion II details characteristics and features of high impedance (MG) to di erentiate non-HIF events from HIF events. W. C. faults. Theoretical foundation for data driven techniques is laid Santos presented a transient based approach to identify HIF in down in Section III. Proposed techniques have been tested on power distribution systems (Santos et al., 2017) . In (Ferdowsi IEEE 13-node test system and results are discussed in Section et al., 2017), real time complexity measurement (RCM) based IV. Section V concludes the research. approach is used to detect HIF. In (Ghaderi et al., 2016) HIF de- tection techniques are evaluated and compared with each. With 2. High Impedance Fault Characteristics the advancement in technology, the trend has been shifted to- wards smart grids and smart distribution systems. Smart dis- In this section, prominent features of high impedance faults tribution systems include measurements (such as voltage and are described. To obtain training data from simulation, a fault current) at each node that helped to discover and develop digi- model is simulated in Simulink and training data is obtained tal signal processing based fault detection techniques (Lai et al., from voltage and current sensors installed in the network. 2005; Elkalashy et al., 2007; Sheelvant, 2015). Prior studies have helped to reveal many of the hidden char- 2.1. Properties of High Impedance Faults acteristics of High Impedance Faults. But the major drawback Arcing is a prominent phenomena in HIFs. The arc is formed of aforementioned techniques is that they are not capable of de- due to air gap between energised conductor and high impedance tecting all types of high impedance faults. Furthermore, active object. Arc ignition occurs when magnitude of voltage is higher methods of HIF detection use signal injection which deterio- than air gap breakdown voltage. Consequently, arc extinction rates the power quality. Some methods employ data gathered occurs when voltage is lower than breakdown voltage (Ghaderi by PMUs, which are quite expensive and also many distribution et al., 2016). The value of break down voltage changes during systems currently don’t deploy PMUs. Another disadvantage is each cycle. Thus, in every cycle of voltage, the HIF current that most of the proposed methods use a lot of computing power includes two arc re-ignitions and two arc extinctions. There- and thus can not be implemented on an embedded system as a fore, current conducting path changes during each cycle which portable numerical relay. changes the magnitude of HIF current making it non-linear, The motivation for this research work lies in manifold short- also HIF current is intermittent in nature (Ghaderi et al., 2016). comings of the prior research. The proposed method is compu- Some of the typical features of high impedance faults are as tationally less rigorous, so it can be implemented on an embed- follows: ded system as a numerical relay. The method ensures power quality as it does not inject any signal into power system for Non linearity: Voltage-current characteristics are highly HIF detection. The technique developed can detect all types nonlinear due to change in current conducting path (Chen of HIF i.e., broken and unbroken conductor HIFs and can lo- et al., 2013). cate the faulty section of network. Furthermore, input data is Asymmetric nature of HIF current: Peak values of cur- gathered using CTs and PTs which are already deployed in all rent are di erent in positive and negative half cycle due distribution networks, so no additional hardware installation is to the presence of varying break down voltage (Ghaderi needed for data acquisition. The proposed method is accurate et al., 2016; Biswal, 2017). and highly reliable as it can distinguish load switching from faults, and can also detect and isolate multiple high impedance Intermittent nature: HIF current is not steady due to faults in the power network. The training model used for de- intermittent nature of arc (Mai et al., 2012). tecting faults is of low order and can easily be implemented 2 Fig. 1: The selected HIF model (Brahma, 2013) Build up: Current magnitude progressively increases till it reaches it maximum value (Biswal, 2017) Fig. 2: Arc current and voltage during HIF Randomness: Magnitude of HIF current and its shape changes with time due change in impedance of conduct- ing path (Sykulski, 2006). Low and high frequency components: HIF current in- cludes low frequency components due to non-linearity of HIF. Additionally, HIF current also contains high fre- quency components due to intermittent nature of arc (Ghaderi et al., 2016). 2.2. Simulation of High Impedance Fault To obtain training data from simulation, appropriate model of HIF is required which would show real behaviour of an HIF. This paper utilises an HIF model shown in Fig. 1, connected Fig. 3: The v-i characteristics of HIF between any of phase and ground (Brahma, 2013). The model is simulated in MATLAB, the parameters of model are tuned according to test feeder. In this HIF model, two diodes D and D are connected p n V = 1:0 kv; with 10% variation to two DC voltage sources V and V , respectively. The DC p n V = 0:5 kv; with 10% variation sources have di erent magnitude and their magnitude randomly R ; R = 1000 ; with random variation p n changes around V and V after every 0.11 ms. This models the p n asymmetric nature of arc current and intermediate arc extinc- The above model is simulated in Matlab . There are two tion. steps involved in modelling HIF; in first step, variable DC volt- To model the randomness in duration of arc extinction in age sources are modelled using controlled voltages source; in high impedance fault, voltage polarity also changes at every second step, variable resistances are modelled using controlled sampling instant (Brahma, 2013). When the instantaneous value current sources. First part is implemented using only random of phase voltage is greater than V , current flows towards ground, number generator, constant block, and controlled voltage source when the instantaneous value of phase voltage is less than V , is used to obtain varying DC voltages. Second step involves current reserves its direction, when the instantaneous value of a build-up series R-L circuit and a sinusoidal signal of 60 Hz. phase voltage is between V , and V , no current flows. In order p n Both of these generate an exponentially growing sine wave. The to incorporate varying arc resistance, the model of HIF also in- sine wave is multiplied with a random number of amplitude 1 cludes two variable resistances, R and R , such that values of p n and variance of 0.12 to obtain a randomly varying resistance. these resistances vary randomly after every 0.11 ms. Fig. 2 shows arc current and voltage waveforms obtained The parameters used for HIF model with IEEE 13-node test as a result of modelling HIF in Simulink, using HIF model of feeder in Simulink are: Fig. 1. It is clear that the arc current is small, random, asym- metric, and nonlinear in nature. The voltage waveform in Fig. 2 3 also shows the random behaviour. Fig. 3 shows the v-i char- acteristics of HIF, the v-i characteristics of HIF and the cur- rent waveform are quite similar to those got from a staged fault (Brahma, 2013). 3. Theoretical Foundation Data driven techniques are the perfect candidate for fault diagnoses in large systems where enough amount of data is available. Principal Component Analysis, Fischer Discrimi- nant Analysis, and Support Vector Machines are widely used for addressing diagnosis problems due to their simplicity and eciency in processing large amount of data. Here the theoret- ical basis for applied algorithms is given. 3.1. Principal Component Analysis Fig. 4: Flowchart for oine fault computation using PCA Principal Component analysis is linear dimensional reduc- tion technique, it projects higher dimensional data into lower dimensions while keeping significant features. PCA has ability Once the data is projected in lower dimensions, Hotteling’s T to retain maximum variation that is possible in lower dimen- statistics is used for fault detection. Hotteling’s T - statistics sions such that transformed features are linear combination of can be calculated as (Jamil et al., 2015; Chiang et al., 2000), primary features. In reduced dimensions, di erent statistical 2 T 1 T T = x P P x (3) plots such as T or Q-charts are utilised for visualisation of dif- ferent trends. PCA is known as powerful tool for feature extrac- where  is the diagonal matrix of first a singular values, P is tion and data reduction in fault detection techniques because of the loading vector matrix corresponding to first a singular val- simplicity and its ability to process large amount of data (Jamil ues. The Hotteling’s T - statistics (3) is scaled squared 2-norm et al., 2015). of observation space X, measures systematic variations of the Application of PCA for fault diagnoses consists of three process, and if there is violations, it will indicate that system- steps; first of all, loading vectors (transformation vectors) are atic variations are out of control. If is the level of significance, calculated by performing oine computations on training data; the threshold of T statistics can be calculated as (Chiang et al., in second step, the loading vectors are utilised to transform on- 2000), line data (higher dimensional data) into lower dimensions; in 2 m(n 1)(n + 1) third step, test statistics such as T are used to detect fault (Jamil T = F (m; n m) (4) n(n m) et al., 2015). Let us assume that a training set of m process variables, with Where F (m; n m) is known as F-distribution with m and (n- set of n observations, is normalised to unit variance and zero m) degree of freedom (Chiang et al., 2000). Essential condition mean by subtracting each process variable by its mean and di- for fault detection occurs if Hotteling’s T - statistics exceeds its viding by standard deviation of data, and is shown in the form of threshold value, that is, nm input matrix X2R . With the help of singular value decompo- 2 2 T  T Fault f ree case sition of input data matrix X, loading vectors or transformation 2 2 T > T sFault case vectors are calculated. A complete flowchart for oine and online computation of the X = UV (1) PCA algorithm for fault detection is shown in Fig. 4 and 5, 1 n respectively. In equation (1), U and V are unitary matrices, and  is called diagonal matrix and its singular values are in decreasing order. 3.2. Fisher discriminant analysis The transformation vectors are orthonormal vectors of matrix Fisher discriminant analysis is one of the most powerful mm th V 2 R . Training set’s variance projected along the u col- methods for dimensionality reduction. In case of fault detec- umn of V is equal to  . In PCA, loading vectors or trans- tion, PCA gives very good results. However, it has poor prop- formation vectors related to a largest singular value are kept to erties of fault classification because it does not consider infor- capture large data variation in lower dimensions. Let us assume mation (variance) among di erent classes of data during com- ma mm that P 2 R is the matrix with first a column of V 2 R , putation of loading vectors (Jamil et al., 2015). FDA consid- and projection of observed data X into reduced dimensions are ers information among di erent classes of data, so it is more incorporated in the score matrix T is given as, favourable for fault classification. It determines a set of trans- formation vectors, known as FDA vectors. FDA vectors max- T = X P (2) imise the information (distance) among di erent classes of data, 4 Where  is generalised eigenvalue representing the extent of separability between classes and  are respective eigenvec- tors. Equation (5) shows optimisation problem that ensures minimum scatter within class and maximum scatter between di erent data classes. This feature helps to classify faults. In order to project online data into lower dimensional space, a ma- (mq1) trix V 2 R with q-1 FDA vectors is defined as, such data (q1) projected data z 2 R is given by z = V x (10) i i For fault detection Hotteling’s T - statistics is used (Yin et al., 2012), given by 2 T T 1 T T = x V (V S V ) V x (11) a k a k a a Fig. 5: Flowchart for online fault computation using PCA Where a shows the number of non-zero eigenvalues. For a given level of significance , threshold for Hotteling’s T - statistics is given by: while minimising information within each class in projected space. FDA tries to centralise di erent data classes and fea- a(n 1)(n + 1) T = F (a; n a) (12) ture recognition rates of FDA is better than PCA. According to n(n 1) (Adil et al., 2016), performance of FDA for fault detection and 2 2 T  T Fault f ree case classification is quite better than that of PCA. 2 2 T > T Fault case The procedure to implement FDA is similar to PCA. First of all, FDA vectors are computed using training data, then these For fault classification, the discriminant function is used as given FDA vectors are utilised to transform online data into lower di- below: mensional space. Finally, a discriminant function isolates the 1 1 T T 1 T fault. In FDA training data, both normal and faulty data is used g (x) = (x x ) V ( V S V ) V (x x ) k k q k q k q q 2 n 1 for computation of FDA vectors, however, in PCA only nor- 1 1 mal data is used for computation of loading vectors (Adil et al., +ln(q ) ln[det( V S V )] (13) i k q 2 n 1 2016; Chiang et al., 2000). In order to detect fault with the help of FDA, Hotteling’s T - statistics is used. In above equation, g k (x) is the discriminant function associ- Let us assume that a training set of m process variables, ated with class k, provided a data vector x2R , online data is with set of n observations, is shown in the form of input matrix associated with class i provided that the discriminant function nm X2R . Consider q as number of classes in di erent faults and belonging to i h class is maximum for a fault in class i, can be n is number of observations in k h class, let x be the transpose k i expressed as, of i row of matrix X. The transformation vector  is computed th g (x) > g (x) (14) i k using training data such that following optimisation is solved. T A complete flowchart for oine training of the FDA algorithm J () = arg max (5) F DA ,0 is shown in Fig. 6. Where S w shows within class scatter matrix given by 3.3. Support Vector Machines (SVM) SVM is a well-known data driven technique used for detec- S =  S (6) w k k=1 tion and classification of faults due to its generalisation abil- With ity and being less susceptible to the curse of dimensionality (Burges, 1997). For the first time, Support vector machines n T S =  (x x )(x x ) (7) k i k i k x 2 i k were used by Vapnik (Zhang, 2010). It is one of the new ma- chine learning tools for classification of linear and nonlinear and the mean of kth class x =  x similarly S is be- k x 2x i b i k n k data. SVM is a binary classifier that maximises the margin be- tween class scatter matrix given by tween two data classes through a hyper-plane as shown in Fig. 7. SVMs maximise the margin near separating hyperplane. The S =  (x x )(x x ) (8) b i k i k decision of separation is fully identified by the support vectors. With x shows the combined (total) mean vector given by x = Solution of SVM is obtained through solution of quadratic pro- 1 n x it is stated that solution to above optimisation problem gramming. n i=1 is identical to eigenvalue decomposition problem (Ding, 2014), In SVM, a discriminant function is used to di erentiate dif- ferent classes of data given by: S  =  S  (9) f (x) = w x + b (15) b h h w h 5 Fig. 7: Linear separating hyperplane (Nayak, 1998) Fig. 6: Flowchart for oine training of FDA Fig. 8: Mapping of data to feature space (Nayak, 1998) Where b, the bias, x, the data points, and w, the weighting According to Representer theorem, w can be written as linear vector, are obtained through training data. In two-dimensional combination of input vectors. space, the discriminant function is a line, in three-dimensional w =  x (19) j j space, the discriminant function is a plane, and in n-dimensional j=1 space, the discriminant function is a hyperplane. SVM gener- Thus ates the optimal separating hyperplane by calculating the value T N T of bias, weighting vector in such way that maximum margin f (x) = w x + b = b +  x x (20) l=1 l is achieved. The points in training set with least perpendicular All the dot products can be replaced with distance to the hyperplane are known as support vectors. The margin of the optimal separator can be defined as width of sep- k(c; d) = c d (21) aration between support vectors. Optimisation problem: f (x ) = 2 = 2r (16) N N min a; b  k(x ; x ) + C  (22) j l j k j j;l=1 j=1 3.3.1. The Kernel Trick (Feature Space) Where  j>0 The cases in which training data is not linearly separable in y  k(x ; x ) + b  1  (23) j l l j j l=1 the original space using above methods, then, this kind of data can be mapped to a higher-dimensional space which makes the In order to test the pattern, we use: data separable (Nayak, 1998), as shown in Fig. 8. f (x) = b +  k(x ; x) (24) l l A kernel function is a type of function that corresponds to l=1 an inner product in the higher dimensional space. For example, Euclidean dot product can be substituted with dot product in if data is mapped to feature space through a transformation  : feature space “”, which will permit nonlinear classification. x ! '(x), then, the inner product results: k(c; d) = (c) (d) (25) K(xi; x j) = (xi)T(x j) (17) k(c; d) is known as kernel function and corresponding SVM is There are di erent types of kernels, such as, polynomial, linear, called kernelized SVM. This type of SVM can solve the issue Radial Basis Function (RBF) etc. The discriminant function of of classification of not linear separable data. Steps involved in SVM, can be written as: implementation of kernelized SVM are: f (x) = w x + b (18) 6 Fig. 10: Projection of training data and testing in two dimensional space for PCA Fig. 9: IEEE 13-node Distribution Test Feeder Step 1: Input data is normalised. Step 2: Training of SVM. Step 2.1: Selection of kernel function. Step 2.2: Selection of kernel parameter. Step 2.3: Optimisation of penalty factor (C). Step 2.4: Cross validation. Step 3: Classification of SVM test data. 3.3.2. Multiclass SVM Fig. 11: The results of Hotteling’s T statistics to detect HIF Binary class SVM can be used for fault detection, but it can- not be used for fault classification. However in practical cases, discrimination of more than two classes is required, hence, mul- data and 100 samples of faulty data. PCA algorithm has been ticlass pattern recognition is often required in real world prob- applied on training data and 29 principal components are ob- lems (Xue, 2014). In majority of cases, multiclass pattern recog- tained. Out of 29 principal components only 5 principal com- ponents have been retained, the decision is made on the basis of nition problems are decomposed into series of binary problems total variance captured by these 5 principal components. The such that binary pattern recognition techniques can easily be value of , as mentioned in (4), is taken 0.001. As we have applied in practical cases. multiclass SVM algorithms such 1:6983 retained 5 principal components so ( ) = 98% of total vari- as one-versus-one, one-versus-all, can be applied be applied to 1:72 ance has been captured by first five principal components. classify more than two faults. Fig. 10 shows projection of training data and testing in two dimensional space. It can be observed that first two components 4. Application of Data Driven Techniques to Diagnose HIF capture most of variation in higher dimensional data. Fig. 11 shows the results of Hotteling’s T statistics to detect HIF after HIF is introduced at di erent positions and di erent phase applying (3.3) on test data. It can be seen that normal data conductors of IEEE 13-node test feeder as shown in Fig. 9. In (first 100 samples) lies below threshold value of T statistics, data structure, data is generated from Simulink model of test where threshold value is 22.0108. This threshold value was feeder. There are 29 variables of singles phase, two phase and found using significance level of 0.1% and confidence region three phase voltages of 13-node test feeder. Data has been of 99%. placed in input matrix in such a way that each column of in- PCA can successfully detect high impedance fault as shown put matrix represents voltage and each row of input matrix rep- in Fig. 11. In some cases, it is required to classify di erent resents number of observations. There were 400 observations types of HIFs such as broken conductor and unbroken con- recorded for bus voltages, first 100 observations correspond to ductor HIFs at di erent locations of feeder. For this purpose, normal data, while other 300 observations correspond to three High impedance faults at three di erent locations are analysed. HIF locations at di erent positions of test feeder. Fig. 12 shows plot of Hotteling’s T statistics to detect HIFs at three di erent locations. Results show that PCA can suc- 4.1. Detection of HIF using PCA and Hotteling’s T statistics cessfully detect these three HIFs. Only 5 principal components For diagnoses of HIF using PCA, training data consisting are retained such that (1.6983/1.72)=98% of total variance has of 60 samples of normal condition (without fault) has been se- been captured. Fig. 13 shows projection of training data and test lected while testing data is consist of 100 samples of non-faulty 7 Fig. 14: Projection of training data in two dimensional space by FDA Fig. 12: Plot of Hotteling’s T statistics to detect multiple HIFs Fig. 15: Plot of discriminant function for multiple HIF detection using FDA Fig. 13: Projection of training and test data in 2-D space for multiple faults 4.3. Detection of HIF using SVM data in two dimensional space, it can be seen that PCA cannot discriminate between di erent types of HIFs, this is due to the Support vector machine algorithm has been applied for 29- reason that PCA do not consider information among di erent dimensional data without any dimensional reduction technique. classes of data. We can conclude that PCA is suitable for HIF Selection of optimal value of penalty factor is important, this detection but it cannot classify di erent types of HIFs. is done by performing nested 3-fold cross validation in original data. With the help of cross validation, average area under the 4.2. Detection of HIF using FDA curve was computed for 1000 values of penalty factor between 0.1 and 100. After selection of optimal value of C, SVM classi- FDA is applied for detection and isolation of high impedance fiers were trained with optimal penalty factor and validated on faults in power distribution systems. In order to compute FDA training data so that generalisation would be checked. Test data vectors, both normal and faulty data is used, in this work, 60 of HIF was classified by validated SVM classifier. The pre- samples in training data and 40 samples in test data correspond- dicted labels of test data fairly detects the occurrence of fault, ing to each scenario, that is, faulty and non-faulty case. Fig. 14 that is -1 for non-faulty data and +1 for faulty data as shown in shows projection of training data in two-dimensional space by FDA. In second step, after computation of transformation vec- tors (FDA vectors), the discriminant function is used to test on- line data. Fig. 15 shows plot of discriminant function in each category. It can be observed that up to first 30 samples, value of discriminant function corresponding to normal case has max- imum magnitude, which shows that there is no fault in test feeder. Similarly, after 30 samples, value of discriminant func- tion corresponding to fault at position A has maximum magni- tude, which shows that fault at position has occurred. Same is the case with fault at position B and C. Zoomed view of plot is shown in Fig. 16. The above results have shown that FDA can successfully isolate/locate HIF. This technique is very well suited for moni- toring of power distribution systems. Fig. 16: Zoomed view of discriminant function for multiple HIF detection using FDA 8 Fig. 18: Predicted labels of test data using Multiclass–SVM classifier Fig. 17: Classification of an HIF using binary-class SVM Fig. 17. 4.4. Detection and Classification of HIF using M-SVM Binary class SVM can be used for fault detection, but it cannot be used for fault classification. However, in Power dis- tribution systems, discrimination of more than two classes is re- quired, hence, multiclass pattern recognition is often required in monitoring Power distribution systems. Multiclass SVM (M– SVM) classifier is obtained using training of non-fault cases with class label 4, fault at position A with class label 3, fault at position B with class 2, and fault at position C with class Fig. 19: Predicted labels of test data using M–SVM classifier on a 2-D plane 1. In each classifier, during training, a Gaussian Radial Basis Function kernel with a scaling factor, sigma (), of 0.5 and a penalty factor of 10 is used. The tolerance value for Karush- It can be seen that M-SVM can easily classify high impedance Kuhn-Tucker (KKT) condition for the training of data is taken faults at di erent locations with load variation and capacitor as 0.001. The value of regularization parameter, lambda () switching. So, we can conclude that SVM based techniques is 1. Test data is classified using the trained classifiers for 50 can successfully detect and locate HIFs in a Power Distribution observations of each data class and predicted labels were di er- Network. entiated with known data labels. Fig. 18 shows that up to 50 samples, the predicted labels 5. Conclusion belong to normal class data, indicating that there is no fault. After first 50 samples, predicted labels belong to class label 3, In this research paper, high impedance fault detection and indicating that the fault is occurred at position A. After first classification in power distribution systems has been studied us- 100 samples, predicted labels belong to class label 2, indicating ing data driven techniques. Source-diode-resistance model con- that the fault is occurred at position B. similarly, after first 150 sisting of two diodes with opposite polarity connected to DC samples, predicted labels belong to class label 1, indicating that sources is utilised to simulate the high impedance fault. Data the fault is occurred at position C. Similarly, Fig. 19 show the driven techniques including PCA, FDA, and SVM are applied score plot of test data for each class of data. to detect/classify HIFs. PCA along with Hotteling’s T statis- A comparison is presented to evaluate the results of the tics to detect HIFs, it is demonstrated that PCA successfully proposed technique with those from literature and observations detects HIF but it cannot classify HIFs. Compared to that, FDA have been recorded in Table 1. After testing the technique on can also successfully classify/locate the fault. Further supe- 400 test cases, it is found that proposed method is extremely rior results are achieved by M-SVM, fault classification rate of quick and ecient in detecting HIFs. The proposed method is SVM is better than FDA. M-SVM algorithm can detect all types evaluated through the following performance indices: of HIF and is also robust against capacitor and load switching Dependability: Predicted HIF cases/Actual HIF cases. transients in distribution network. Security: Predicted non-HIF cases/Actual non-HIF cases. Table 1 compares the performance indices of the proposed method. It is noted that the proposed method detects all HIF Conflict of Interest faults under various operating conditions and disturbances. Thus, The authors declare no conflict of interest. the proposed method is accurate, reliable and prompt in the de- tection of High Impedance Faults. 9 Table 1: Comparison of performance indices of the proposed M-SVM method with previous techniques Method Security (%) Dependability (%) Wavelet transform (Chen et al., 2016) 68.5 72 Time frequency transform Samantaray et al. (2008) 81.5 98.3 Morphological gradient (Sarlak and Shahrtash, 2011) 96.3 98.3 Mathematical Morphology (Gautam and Brahma, 2012) 100 100 The proposed method (M-SVM) 100 100 References Lima, E.M., dos Santos Junqueira, C.M., Brito, N.S.D., de Souza, B.A., de Almeida Coelho, R., de Medeiros, H.G.M.S., 2018. High impedance Adamiak, M., Wester, C., Thakur, M., Jensen, C., 2006. High impedance fault fault detection method based on the short-time fourier transform. 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Journal

Electrical Engineering and Systems SciencearXiv (Cornell University)

Published: Aug 9, 2019

References