Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Frequency-Limited Pseudo-Optimal Rational Krylov Algorithm for Power System Reduction

Frequency-Limited Pseudo-Optimal Rational Krylov Algorithm for Power System Reduction THIS PAPER IS ACCEPTED FOR PUBLICATION IN INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ELECTRICAL POWER & ENERGY SYSTEMS: DOI: 10.1016/J.IJEPES.2019.105798. COPYRIGHT RESERVED BY ELSEVIER. 1 Frequency-Limited Pseudo-Optimal Rational Krylov Algorithm for Power System Reduction Umair Zulfiqar, Victor Sreeram, and Xin Du Abstract—In this paper, a computationally efficient frequency- not reduced. On the other hand, the portion whose effect limited model reduction algorithm is presented for large-scale on the analysis in the study area is only of the interest is interconnected power systems. The algorithm generates a reduced mathematically described by a linear model, and it constitutes order model which not only preserves the electromechanical the external area; see Fig. 1. MOR is applied to the linear modes of the original power system but also satisfies a subset model of the external area. For instance, not only that a of the first-order optimality conditions for H model reduction 2;! problem within the desired frequency interval. The reduced order linear model suffice in the small-signal stability analysis and model accurately captures the oscillatory behavior of the original damping controller design, it can be further reduced using power system and provides a good time- and frequency-domain MOR techniques without a significant loss of accuracy [28]. accuracy. The proposed algorithm enables fast simulation, anal- ysis, and damping controller design for the original large-scale power system. The efficacy of the proposed algorithm is validated on benchmark power system examples. Index Terms—Electromechanical modes, Krylov subspace, Modal preservation, Model reduction, Power system oscillations. I. I NTRODUCTION ODAY’S power system is a large network of intercon- nected power apparatus like generators, lines, and buses that covers a large geographical territory. There is a growing trend to facilitate further interconnections with neighboring systems, and thus the size of the interconnected power system network is likely to continue to increase. The mathematical Fig. 1: Partitioning of power system for MOR representation of these large-scale power system networks can easily reach several thousands of differential equations. This poses a challenge for fast and efficient simulation, analysis, The coherency-based MOR methods have been historically and control system design for these large-scale power systems employed to obtain a dynamically equivalent ROM [6]-[8]. despite a significant growth in the storage and computational The response of coherent generators is similar to a particular capabilities in recent time [1]. Model order reduction (MOR) set of inputs. The first step in the coherency-based MOR tech- offers a solution to the problem by providing a reduced order niques is to identify and group the coherent set of generators model (ROM), which enables fast simulation and control and construct a lumped system. A ROM is then obtained from system design without significantly affecting the accuracy. the lumped model by exploiting the physical properties of MOR is generally referred to as “dynamic equivalency” in electrical machines connected to the power system network. the power system literature [2]. The dependence on physical properties restricts the flexible The analysis of a complete power system network with every applicability of these methods. Recently, an increasing interest subtle detail is neither practical nor required. In the MOR of in MOR techniques which rely on the mathematical properties power systems, the power system is first partitioned according instead of the physical properties of the power system appa- to the importance [1]-[6]. The portion of the power system ratus is shown by the power system community [4], [9]. For under investigation, which contains the important variables, instance, balanced truncation and moment matching have been constitutes the study area, and it is mathematically described successfully used in power system reduction, showing some by a detailed nonlinear model. Note that this study area is promising results [10]-[12]. The power systems exhibit local and interarea oscillations U. Zulfiqar and V. Sreeram are with the School of Electrical, Electronics in the frequency region between 0:8 2 Hz and 0:1 0:7 and Computer Engineering, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hz, respectively [13]. These are associated with the poorly Highway, Crawley, WA 6009 (email: umair.zulfiqar@research.uwa.edu.au, victor.sreeram@uwa.edu.au). damped modes of the power system model and are often X. Du is with the School of Mechatronic Engineering and Automation, called “electromechanical or critical modes”. These modes Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072, China, and also with the Shanghai Key are crucial for small-signal stability analysis and for the Laboratory of Power Station Automation Technology, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444, P.R. China (e-mail: duxin@shu.edu.cn) damping controller design. Therefore, these modes must be arXiv:1910.02374v2 [eess.SY] 27 Jan 2020 THIS PAPER IS ACCEPTED FOR PUBLICATION IN INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ELECTRICAL POWER & ENERGY SYSTEMS: DOI: 10.1016/J.IJEPES.2019.105798. COPYRIGHT RESERVED BY ELSEVIER. 2 preserved in the ROM to retain the oscillatory behavior of the propose a computationally efficient MOR algorithm that en- original model. The frequency response of the ROM should sures a good accuracy in the specified frequency region with closely match that of the original system within 0:1 2 Hz. explicit modal preservation. Unlike [20], a fairly compact The importance of good frequency-domain accuracy within ROM can be obtained using the proposed algorithm, and the 0:1 2 Hz has been recognized consistently in the literature; order of ROM can even be equal to the number of modes see for instance [5], [14]. In [5], the ROM interpolates the to be preserved. The algorithm uses a moment matching original system at and around zero frequency to effectively approach based on the parametrized family of ROM [23] capture these oscillations in the frequency-domain. In [14], it and generates a ROM which satisfies a subset of the first- is suggested to retain the critical modes in the ROM to preserve order optimality conditions for frequency-limited H -MOR the oscillation associated with these modes. problem [22]. Unlike [21] and [22], the proposed algorithm The preservation of slow and poorly damped modes in the is iteration-free and does not requires the solutions of large- ROM is beneficial from the damping controller design per- scale Lyapunov equations, LMIs, and pole-residue form. The spective [14], and it also improves the accuracy of the ROM performance of the proposed algorithm is tested by considering in the time-domain [4], [9], [15]. Most of the MOR algorithms benchmark power system reduction problems. used for power system reduction like balanced truncation [16] and moment matching [5] do not have modal preservation property. It is customary to increase the order of ROM in II. P RELIMINARIES these algorithms in a hope to capture the poorly damped critical modes of the original system in the ROM. This popular belief has recently been refuted in [4], and it is argued that Consider an e -machine, k-bus system as the external area there is no guarantee to capture these modes in the ROM by which is connected to p-buses of the study area via p-tie lines. increasing the order. It is further shown that the quality of The external area can be described by the following second- the ROM can be improved by preserving the slow and poorly order classical model [35] used for power system reduction damped modes instead of increasing its order [4]. In [15], for i = 1; ; e , i.e., an H -MOR algorithm is proposed for power systems that includes modal preservation as a cost function of its optimality = !  ! i i s criteria. The algorithm does preserve the electromechanical modes in the ROM, but the first-order optimality conditions 2H !  = T D (!  !  ) i i i i s (as defined in [17], [18]) of H -MOR are no longer satisfied with this heuristic modification in [18]. It gives good frequency n E E G cos(  ) + E B sin(  ) and time domain accuracy, but the excessive computational i j ij i j j ij i j j=1 cost associated with the particle swarm optimization tech- nique [19] makes it unsuitable for large-scale systems. In X E V G cos(  ) + V B sin(  ) : (1) [20], the power system reduction is considered as a finite- i j ij i j j ij i j j=1 frequency MOR problem with an additional constraint that the electromechanical modes of the systems are preserved in the ROM. The algorithm is computationally efficient, but the H , D ,  , !  , E , and T are the inertial coefficient, damping i i i i i i ROM of acceptable accuracy is not that compact because it coefficient, rotor angle, angular velocity, internal voltage, and uses modal truncation to preserve critical modes. The order mechanical input power respectively of the machine i of the of ROM should be significantly larger than the number of external area. !  is the reference angular velocity. V and s j j modes to be preserved. The accuracy in the specified frequency are the voltage magnitude and angle on the p-buses of the region is obtained by using frequency-dependent extended study area. The admittance G +jB connects machine i with ij ij realization of the original system. MOR is applied to this machine j, and the admittance G + jB connects machine ij ij extended realization, and the ROM is obtained via an inverse i with the boundary bus j. The nonlinear model in equation transformation. In [21], the optimal frequency-limited H - (1) can be linearized around an equilibrium point to obtain a th MOR problem is considered, and an algorithm is proposed, n order state-space model, i.e., which generates an optimal ROM. The algorithm requires the solution of Lyapunov equations and linear matrix inequalities (LMIs) to find the optimal ROM, which is not feasible in a = A + B ;  = C : (2) !  V ! !  j large-scale setting. In [22], the problem is described as bi- tangential Hermite interpolation, which can be solved in a computationally efficient way. However, the original system is The inputs are the angles and magnitudes of the voltages on the required to be converted into pole-residue form, which is again p buses of the study area, which are connected to the external computationally not feasible in a large-scale setting. Moreover, area. The outputs are the rotor angle of the p generators of the both the algorithm [21] and [22] are iterative algorithms with external area, which are connected to the study area. The step- no guarantee on the convergence, and they do not have a modal wise procedure to generate equilibrium points and to reach preservation property. equation (2) can be found in [36]-[39]. In this paper, we consider the same problem of [20] and The nonlinear model (which is used for the damping controller THIS PAPER IS ACCEPTED FOR PUBLICATION IN INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ELECTRICAL POWER & ENERGY SYSTEMS: DOI: 10.1016/J.IJEPES.2019.105798. COPYRIGHT RESERVED BY ELSEVIER. 3 TABLE I: Mathematical Notations design in this paper) is given by the following equations: Notation Meaning = !  !  ; (3) i i s Hermitian of the matrix. Re() Real part of the matrix. 2H 0 0 0 0 () Eigenvalues of the matrix. !  = T (E X I )I (E + X I )I ; (4) i i i di qi qi di qi di di qi s Ran() Range of the matrix. 0 span fg Span of the set of r vectors. (X X )I E qi di di fdi _0 di i=1; ;r E = + ; (5) qi 0 0 0 jjjj H -norm of the system. H 2 doi doi doi jjjj Frequency-limited H -norm of the system. H 2 2;! (X X )I qi qi qi L[] Frechet ´ derivative of the matrix logarithm. _0 di E = ; (6) di 0 0 qoi qoi K + S (E ) E ~ V ~ Ei Ei fdi fdi Ri points in the respective tangential directions, i.e., G( )t = i i E = + ; (7) fdi T T G( )t if the input rational Krylov subspace V is given by Ei Di i i K R K K E V 1 Ai Fi Ai Fi fdi Ri _ ~ ~ Ran(V ) = span f( I A) Bt g: (13) V = + i i Ri i=1; ;r T T T T Ai Fi Ai Ai K (V V + V ) Ai ref i s i i G(s) interpolates G(s) at the interpolation points in the + ; (8) respective tangential directions for any output rational Krylov ~ ~ ~ ~ subspace W such that W V = I . Choose any W , for instance, R K E F F fdi i i R = + : (9) i ~ ~ W = V , and compute the following matrices T T T T T ~ ~  ~ ~  ~ E = W V ; A = W AV ; B = W B; (14) Equations (3)-(5) describe the dynamics of the machines where 0 0 1 E , I , X , and  are the emfs, currents, reactances, and B = B V E B; (15) di di ? di doi time constants for the d-axis of the machine i; E , I , X , T 1 T 1 qi qi ~ ~ ~ qi C = (B B ) B AV V E A ; (16) t ? ? ? and  are the emfs, currents, reactances, and time constants qoi S = E A BC : (17) for the q-axis of the machine i; and E is the emf across fdi the field winding of machine i. Equations (6)-(9) describe Then V satisfies the following Sylvester equation: the dynamics of the exciter, and the detailed description of ~ ~ ~ AV + V (S) + B(C ) = 0 the definitions of the parameters used in equations (6)-(9) can be found in [42]. The nonlinear equations (3)-(9) can be where f ; ;  g are the eigenvalues of S. If the pair 1 r th ~ ~ ~ linearized to obtain a n order linear model, i.e., (S; C ) is observable, the ROM obtained with V and W can be parameterized in  to obtain a family of ROMs which satisfy x _ = Ax + Bu; y = C x: (10) ~ ~ the interpolation condition G( )t = G( )t , i.e., i i i i where ~ ~ ~ ~ A = S + C B =  C = CV: 0 0 1 T ~ ~ ~ !  E E E V R x = ; i i fdi Ri F If  is set to  = Q C where Q solves qi di i t t t T T T ~ ~ ~ ~ (S )Q + Q (S) + C C = 0; t t t u = T V , and y =  . i ref i th Let G(s) be the n order power system model with m inputs ~ it ensures that G(s) is a pseudo-optimal ROM for the problem and p outputs, i.e., ~ jjG(s) G(s)jj which satisfies the subset of first-order optimality conditions [18], i.e., G(s) = C (sI A) B: (11) 2 2 2 ~ ~ jjG(s) G(s)jj = jjG(s)jj jjG(s)jj : H H H th 2 2 2 The power system reduction problem is to find an r (r << n) order ROM G(s) of the original model G(s) such that B. Frequency-Limited Balanced Truncation (FLBT) [25] the error jjG(s) G(s)jj is small in some defined sense. In [25], a frequency-limited generalization of balanced The projection based MOR techniques construct reduction truncation [16] is presented which allows the user to spec- ~ ~ subspaces V and W , and the original system is projected onto ify the desired frequency region wherein superior accuracy that reduced subspace such that the dominant characteristics is required. In FLBT [25], the standard controllability and of the original system are retained in the ROM, i.e., observability Gramians, which are defined over the infinite T 1 T ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ frequency range, are replaced with the ones defined over the G(s) = CV (sI W AV ) W B frequency region of interest. Let P and Q be the frequency- 1 ! ! ~ ~ ~ = C (sI A) B: (12) limited controllability and observability Gramains respectively The important mathematical notations which are used through- defined over the desired frequency interval [!; !] rad/sec, out the text are tabulated in Table I. i.e., 1 T T 1 P = (jI A) BB (jI A ) d A. Pseudo-Optimal Rational Krylov (PORK) Algorithm [24] ! T 1 T 1 Let  be the interpolation points in the tangential directions i Q = (jI A ) C C (jI A) d m1 2 t 2 R . Then G(s) interpolates G(s) at the interpolation ! i THIS PAPER IS ACCEPTED FOR PUBLICATION IN INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ELECTRICAL POWER & ENERGY SYSTEMS: DOI: 10.1016/J.IJEPES.2019.105798. COPYRIGHT RESERVED BY ELSEVIER. 4 which solve the following Lyapunov equations: is computationally expensive and cannot be applied to large- scale systems. In [22], the Gramian based optimality condi- T T T T AP + P A + F (A)BB + BB F (A) = 0 ! ! tions (19)-(21) are transformed into interpolation conditions; T T T T A Q + Q A + F (A) C C + C CF (A) = 0 ! ! however, the iterative algorithm presented to achieve the local optimality requires the original system to be in pole-residue where form which is only feasible for small-scale systems. Moreover, there is no guarantee on the convergence of the algorithm. F (A) = (jI A) d (18) In [26], a heuristic algorithm is presented, which produces a ROM with less H -error, i.e., frequency-limited iterative 2;! = Re ln(j!I A) : rational Krylov algorithm (FLIRKA). Again, the convergence is not guaranteed in FLIRKA as well. The similarity transformation matrix T is computed from P ! ! 1 T and Q as a contragradient transformation, i.e., T P T = ! ! ! ! T Q T = diag(  ;   ; ;   ) where ! ! 1 2 n 1 2 III. M AIN WORK . The states associated with the least value of frequency- ~ ~ limited Hankel singular values   are truncated. V and W The analytical damping controller design procedures like T T T ~ ~ ~ ~ LQG and H result in a controller whose order is greater in FLBT are computed as V = T Z and W = T Z ; ! 1 than or equal to that of the power system model. To obtain a respectively where Z = I 0 . rr r(nr) lower order controller, a ROM of the original model is first sought using MOR [27]-[29]. It is stressed in [14] that the C. Frequency-Limited H -Optimal MOR ROM should preserve the critical modes and the frequency- In [21], a nonlinear optimization-based MOR algorithm domain behavior of the original system over the frequencies is presented to achieve the local optimality for the problem associated with the critical modes. These modes are generally jjG(s) G(s)jj where 2;! poorly damped and can cause unstable operating conditions under heavy power transfers. Thus, the preservation of their jjG(s) G(s)jj 2;! identity in the ROM is critical for a good damping controller 2 2 T ~ ^ ~ = jjG(s)jj +jjG(s)jj 2 trace(CP C ) H H design that adds damping to these modes [14]. Moreover, 2;! 2;! 2 2 T ~ ~ ^ it is shown in [4], [9], [15] that the preservation of these = jjG(s)jj +jjG(s)jj 2 trace(B Q B); H H 2;! 2;! modes also improves the accuracy in the time-domain. We 2 T jjG(s)jj = trace G(j)G(j) d present a MOR algorithm for the power system reduction 2;! problem under consideration which not only preserves the specified modes of the original system, but it also ensures = trace G(j) G(j) d ! superior accuracy within the frequency region specified by the user. The proposed algorithm generates a ROM which = trace(CP C ) T satisfies a subset of the optimality conditions (19)-(21). We = trace(B Q B); call a ROM which satisfies either (19) or (20) as a frequency- and limited pseudo-optimal ROM, and we name our algorithm as “Frequency-limited Pseudo-optimal Rational Krylov algorithm T T T T ^ ^ ~ ~ ~ ~ AP + P A + F (A)BB + BB F (A) = 0 ! ! (FLPORK)”. FLPORK generates a ROM which has poles at T T T T ~ ^ ^ ~ ~ ~ A Q + Q A + F (A) C C + C CF (A) = 0: ! ! the desired locations specified by the user. G(s) is a local optimum for this problem if the following first-order optimality conditions are satisfied: A. FLPORK ^ ~ ~ Q B = Q B (19) We now present an algorithm that generates a frequency- ! ! limited pseudo-optimal ROM of G(s). Let  be the interpo- ^ ~ ~ CP = CP (20) ! ! m1 lation points in the tangential directions t 2 R . Define ^ ^ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ^ Q P + Q P = Re L[A j!I;V ] (21) B , G (s), G (s), S, C , and C as ! ! ! ! ! ! ! t t where B = B F (A)B ; G (s) = C (sI A) B ; ! ! ! 1  1 T T T ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ G (s) = CV (sI W AV ) W B = C (sI A) B ; AP + P A + F (A)BB + BB F (A) = 0; (22) ! ! ! ! ! T T T T ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ S = diag( ; ;  ); C = t  t ; 1 r t 1 r A Q + Q A + F (A) C C + C CF (A) = 0; (23) ! ! T T ~ ~ ~ ~ ^ C F (S) V = C CP C CP : (24) ! ! ^ C = = c ^  c ^ : (25) t 1 r When G(s) satisfies either (19) or (20), the following holds ~ ~ G (s) interpolates G (s), i.e., G ( )c ^ = G ( )c ^ for any 2 2 2 ! ! ! i i ! i i ~ ~ jjG(s) G(s)jj = jjG(s)jj jjG(s)jj : H H H 2;! 2;! 2;! ~ ~ ~ W such that W V = I if The nonlinear optimization algorithm to achieve a ROM which 1 1 V = (A  I ) B c ^  (A  I ) B c ^ : (26) 1 ! 1 r ! r satisfies the above-mentioned first-order optimality conditions THIS PAPER IS ACCEPTED FOR PUBLICATION IN INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ELECTRICAL POWER & ENERGY SYSTEMS: DOI: 10.1016/J.IJEPES.2019.105798. COPYRIGHT RESERVED BY ELSEVIER. 5 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ From the relation of Krylov subspaces and Sylvester equations Due to uniqueness, Q P Q = Q , Q P = I , and s! ! s! s! s! ! ~ ~ ~ [30], it can be noted that V solves the following Sylvester P = (Q ) . ! s! equation: (iii) Consider the following equation: ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ AV P + V P A + F (A)BB + BB F (A) ! ! ~ ~ ^ AV + V (S) + B (C ) = 0: (27) ! t ~ ^ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ = [V S + B C ]P + V P [(Q ) S Q ] ! t ! ! s! s! ~ ~ ~ ~ F (A)BC P BC F (S)P If all the eigenvalues of S have a positive real part and the t ! t ! ^ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ pair (S; C ) is observable, (A; B ; C ) obtained with V and W ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ t ! = V SP + F (A)BC P + BC F (S)P V SP ! t ! t ! ! can be parameterized in  to obtain a family of ROMs [23], ~ ~ ~ ~ F (A)BC P BC F (S)P t ! t ! i.e., = 0: ~ ^ ~ ~ ~ A = S + C ; B = ; C = CV (28) t ! ~ ~ ^ ^ ~ ~ Due to uniqueness, V P = P , and thus, CP = CP . ! ! ! ! ~ ~ ~ (iv) A = (Q ) (S )(Q ) is actually the spectral fac- s! s! ~ T which satisfy the interpolation condition G ( )c ^ = 1 ~ ~ ~ ! i i ~ ~ torization of A. Moveover, B = (Q ) t  t . s! 1 r G ( )c ^ . This can be readily verified by multiplying (27) ! i i ~ Thus, t is the input-residual of G(s). with W from the left; see [30]. Set  to A dual result also exists wherein W is fixed with an 1  1 ~ ~ ~ ~ = (Q ) C (Q ) F (S)C (29) ~ s! s! t t arbitrary choice of V , and then the ROM is parameterized to achieve frequency-limited pseudo-optimality. We call it where Output-FLPORK (O-FLPORK) to differentiate with the previous case. There is some abuse in the mathematical ~ ~ (S )Q + Q (S)+ notations, but the context leaves no ambiguity. Let  be the s! s! i 1p interpolation points in the tangential directions t 2 R . ~ ~ ~ ~ i F (S)C C + C C F (S) = 0: (30) t t t t ~ ^ Define C , G (s), G (s), S, B , and B as ! ! ! t t ~ ~ ~ Then, ROM (A; B; C ) in FLPORK is obtained by removing C C = ; G (s) = C (sI A) B; ! ! ! ~ ~ ~ (Q ) F (S)C from B , i.e., CF (A) s! ! ~  1  1 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ G (s) = C V (sI W AV ) W B = C (sI A) B; ! ! ! 1  1 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ A = S (Q ) C C F (S) (Q ) F (S)C C ; s! t s! t t t ^ ^ S = diag( ; ;  ) B = t  t 1 r t 1  1 r ~ ~ ~ ~ B = (Q ) C ; C = CV: (31) s! ~ ~ ^ ^ B = F (S)B B = b  b : (32) t t 1 r ~ ~ ~ Theorem 1: If (A; B; C ) is defined as in equation (31), then ~ ~ ^  ^ G (s) interpolates G (s), i.e., b G ( ) = b G ( ) for any ! ! i ! i i ! i G(s) has the following properties: ~ ~ ~ V such that W V = I if (i) G(s) has poles at the mirror images of the interpolation ~ ^ ^ points  . i W = (A  I ) C b  (A  I ) C b : (33) 1 r ! 1 ! r (ii) (Q ) is the frequency-limited controllability Gramian s! From the relation of Krylov subspaces and Sylvester equations ~ ~ of the pair (A; B). [30], it can be noted that W solves the following Sylvester ^ ~ ~ (iii) CP = CP . ! ! equation: (iv) t is the input-residual of G(s). Proof: (i) By multiplying (Q ) from the left side of ~ ~ ^ s! W A + (S)W + (B )(C ) = 0: (34) t ! equation (30) yields If all the eigenvalues of S have positive real part and the pair ^ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 1  1   (S; B ) is controllable, (A; B; C ) obtained with V and W ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ t ! (Q ) S Q S + (Q ) F (S)C C s! s! s! t can be parameterized in  to obtain a family of ROMs which ~ ~ ~ + (Q ) C C F (S) = 0 ~ s! t t ^  ^ satisfy the interpolation condition b G ( ) = b G ( ) [23], i ! i i ! i ~ ~ ~ (Q ) S Q A = 0: i.e., s! s! ~ ^ ~ ~ ~ A = S + B ; B = W B; C = : (35) t ! ~ ~ ~ ~ Thus A = (Q S Q and hence  (A) =  (S ). s! i i s!) This can be readily verified by multiplying (34) with V from (ii) The frequency-limited controllability Gramian P of ~ ~ the right. Set  to the pair (A; B) solves equation (22). By pre- and post- ~ ~ multiplying equation (22) with Q , by putting A = s!  1 ~ ~ B (P ) s! 1  1 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ = (36) (Q ) S Q and B = (Q ) C , and also by noting s! s! s! t   1 ~ ~ B F (S)(P ) s! 1  t ~ ~ ~ that Q F (A)(Q ) = F (S), equation (22) becomes s! s! where ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ (S )Q P Q + Q P Q (S) ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ s! ! s! s! ! s! (S)P + P (S ) + F (S)B B + B B F (S) = 0: s! s! t t t t ~ ~ ~ ~ + F (S)C C + C C F (S) = 0: (37) t t t t THIS PAPER IS ACCEPTED FOR PUBLICATION IN INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ELECTRICAL POWER & ENERGY SYSTEMS: DOI: 10.1016/J.IJEPES.2019.105798. COPYRIGHT RESERVED BY ELSEVIER. 6 ~ ~ ~ Then, ROM (A; B; C ) in O-FLPORK is obtained by removing FLIRKA ensures good H accuracy if the convergence is 2;! ~ ~ ~ B F (S)(P ) from C , i.e., achieved. Note that FLIRKA is proposed heuristically based s! ! on experimental results. FLPORK and O-FLPORK can thus be 1   1 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ A = S F (S)B B P B B F (S)P ; t t t s! t s! seen as iteration-free algorithms which judiciously place the ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ B = W B; C = B P : (38) poles of G(s) at the mirror images of the interpolation points t s! make the tangential directions as input and output residuals ~ ~ ~ Theorem 2: If (A; B; C ) is defined as in equation (38), then respectively. Therefore, FLPORK and O-FLPORK satisfy (39) G(s) has the following properties: and (40), respectively. (i) G(s) has poles at the mirror images of the interpolation points  . C. Choice of Modes to be Preserved (ii) (P ) is the frequency-limited observability Gramian s! ~ ~ There is no theoretical guarantee that preserving a particular of the pair (A; C ). ^ ~ ~ mode of the original system will surely ensure less error. (iii) Q B = Q B. ! ! ^ However, some general and practical guidelines regarding the (iv) t is the output-residual of G(s). preservation of the “right” set of modes of the original system Proof: The proof is similar to that of Theorem 1 and hence are reported in the literature. For instance, it is suggested in omitted for brevity. [14] to preserve the local and interarea modes in the ROM for accurately capturing the local and interarea oscillations. This Remark 1: If the interpolation points are selected as is particularly important when the ROM is used for obtaining the mirror images of r specified electromechanical poles a damping controller to reduce the local and interarea oscilla- of G(s), the ROM preserves these modes. Moreover, if ! tions. It is argued in [4], [9] that a good time-domain accuracy is selected such that [!; !] contains the frequency region can be achieved if the slowest and most poorly damped modes wherein the local and interarea oscillations lie, the ROM of the original model are preserved in the ROM. The lightly accurately captures these oscillations in its frequency-domain damped modes in the frequency range [0; 2] Hz are called response. electromechanical modes [32] and can easily be captured using Remark 2: For simplicity, it is assumed throughout the paper Subspace Accelerated Rayleigh Quotient Iteration (SARQI) that the desired frequency interval is [!; !]. However, it can algorithm [31]. The peaks and dips in the frequency response be any symmetric interval, i.e., [! ;! ][ [! ; ! ] rad/sec 2 1 1 2 of a system are associated with the modes with large residuals where ! > ! > 0. In that case, F (A) and F (S) become 2 1 Z Z which can be easily captured using Subspace Accelerated ! ! 2 1 1 1 MIMO Dominant Pole Algorithm (SAMDP) [33]. It is shown F (A) = (jI A) d (jI A) d ! ! 2 1 in [33] that the preservation of these modes in the ROM yields Z Z ! ! 2 1 overall good accuracy over the entire frequency range. These 1 1 F (S) = (jI + S) d (jI + S) d : 2 guidelines should be followed when choosing the interpolation ! ! 2 1 points in FLPORK and O-FLPORK to obtain a high-fidelity ROM. B. Connection with FLIRKA [26] Let G(s) be the ROM obtained after FLIRKA converges, D. Algorithmic Aspects and it is represented by the following pole-residue form We allowed the state-space matrices to be complex in the l r ~ previous subsection; however, one can obtain a real ROM for a G(s) = : real original model. F (A) is a real matrix when the desired fre- i=1 quency region is symmetric [21], [34] [! ;! ][[! ; ! ] , 2 1 1 2 Then the reduction subspaces generated by FLIRKA in the last i.e., iteration ensure that the following interpolatory conditions are satisfied: F (A) = Re ln (j! I + A) (j! I + A) : 1 2 G ( )r ^ = G ( )r ^ (39) ! i i ! i i This leads to a real B . The real S and C can be obtained ! t ^  ^ ^ ~ l G ( ) = l G ( ) (40) from equations (13)-(17) which lead to the real C , Q , and ! i ! i i i t s! V . Finally, the ROM is obtained as where 1 T 1 T ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ A = Q S Q ; B = Q C ; s! s! s! t r   r   F (D) i r r ^  r ^ = 1 r ~ ~ r   r  C = CV : i r 2 3 2 2 3 2 33 l l l 1 i i Similarly, C is a real matrix when the desired frequency 6 7 6 6 7 6 77 . . . region is symmetric, i.e., [! ;! ][[! ; ! ]. The real S and . = F (D) . . 2 1 1 2 4 5 4 4 5 4 55 . . . B which have the information of the interpolation points t i l l l r r and tangential directions t encoded in them can be computed D = diag( ; ;  ): 1 r by the following steps. Compute W as ~ T 1 T T In other words, G(s) is an input- and output- frequency- ^ Ran(W ) = span f( I A ) C t g: i=1; ;r limited pseudo optimal ROM. This explains the reason why THIS PAPER IS ACCEPTED FOR PUBLICATION IN INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ELECTRICAL POWER & ENERGY SYSTEMS: DOI: 10.1016/J.IJEPES.2019.105798. COPYRIGHT RESERVED BY ELSEVIER. 7 Choose any V , for instance, V = W . Then compute the iterative rational Krylov algorithm (FFMIRKA) [20] both following matrices in the frequency and time domains on two power system reduction problems. Next, we design a reduced-order H T T E = W V ; A = W AV ; C = CV ; damping controller for the IEEE 145-bus 50-machine system 1 T C = C CE W ? using FLPORK and compare its performance with SARQI [31] T 1 T T T 1 -based modal truncation, PORK [24], FLIRKA [26], FLBT B = W A AE W C (C C ) t ? ? ? [25], and FFMIRKA [20]. The results of O-FLPORK are S = A B C E : indistinguishable from FLPORK, and hence, only results of ~ ^ ~ ~ FLPORK are shown. All the experiments are performed on a The real S and B lead to the real B , P , and W . Then the t t s! laptop with Intel Core M-5Y10c processor, 8GB of RAM, and ROM is obtained as Windows 8 operating system. T 1 T ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ A = P S P ; B = W B; s! s! T 1 ~ ~ ~ C = B P : t s! A. Power System Reduction Test 1: NETS-NYPS connected to IEEE 145-bus 50- E. Computational Aspects machine system via One Tie Line: In this experiment, the FLBT [25] becomes computationally expensive in a large- NETS-NYPS 16-machine, 68-bus system taken from [40] is nd scale setting because it requires the solution of two large-scale considered as the external area described by the 32 order Lyapunov equations. In [34], FLBT is generalized using a linear model in equation (2). The study area is the IEEE 145- low-rank approximation of Lyapunov equations to extend its bus, 50-machine system also taken from [40]. Bus-53 of the applicability to large-scale systems. FLPORK and O-FLPORK external area is connected to the bus-60 of the study area via do not involve large-scale Lyapunov equations like FLBT [25]. one tie line. The inputs are the voltage magnitude and angle on However, as argued in [34], F (A) may become computa- bus-60 of the study area, and the output is the rotor angle of tionally expensive in a large-scale setting. In [34], various generator-1 which is connected to bus-53 of the external area. computationally efficient approaches to compute F (A) are The study area retains its nonlinear description. The rightmost discussed which also includes quadrature rules for numerical most poles of the external area are plotted in Fig. 2, and it integration. The computational cost in these methods directly can be seen that it has several poorly damped modes in its depends on the number of quadrature nodes. A trade-off model. A 10th order ROM of the external area is generated can be done between the accuracy and computational cost depending on the size of A in a particular problem, and an appropriate number of quadrature nodes can be selected to compute the integral F (A) within the admissible time. Once F (A) is computed, the main computational effort in FLPORK and O-FLPORK is spent on the solution of “sparse-dense” Sylvester equations (27) and (34) respectively because the Lyapunov equations (30) and (37) are small-scale equations. Equations (27) and (34) have large but sparse matrices A, B , and C owing to the sparse structure of power system ! ! state-space model [12], and dense but small matrices S, C and B . As shown in [24], the solution of “sparse-dense” Sylvester equations can be obtained within admissible time as long as r << n which is the situation in MOR and therefore, ~ ~ the Krylov subspaces V and W can be computed easily by either using direct or iterative methods. Thus, FLPORK and O-FLPORK are easily applicable to large-scale power systems. Fig. 2: The rightmost modes of NETS-NYPS IV. A PPLICATIONS by SARQI -based modal truncation, PORK, FLIRKA, FLBT, In this section, we demonstrate the applications of FLPORK FFMIRKA, and FLPORK. SARQI, PORK, FFMIRKA, and on three interconnected power system models. The first model FLPORK preserve the most poorly damped two interarea and is an interconnection of the IEEE 145-bus 50-machine system two local modes of the original system, i.e.,0:2748j4:4888 with the New England Test System-New York Power System and 0:25j8:9339, respectively to capture the interarea and (NETS-NYPS) 68-bus 16-machine system. The second model local oscillations in the ROM. SARQI additionally preserves is the interconnection of the Northeastern Power Coordinating the following modes: 0:25  j14:3865, 0:25  j13:4964, th Council (NPCC) 140-bus 48-machine system with the IEEE and0:2514j11:6271 to make the ROM a 10 order model. 145-bus 50-machine system. The third model is the IEEE 145- The mirror images of the poorly damped modes may be a bus 50-machine system. We first compare the performance of poor choice of interpolation points for H -MOR problem. 2;! FLPORK with SARQI [31] -based modal truncation, PORK Also, the accuracy in the tangential interpolation algorithms [24], FLIRKA [26], FLBT [25], and finite-frequency modal depends strongly on the choice of interpolation points and THIS PAPER IS ACCEPTED FOR PUBLICATION IN INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ELECTRICAL POWER & ENERGY SYSTEMS: DOI: 10.1016/J.IJEPES.2019.105798. COPYRIGHT RESERVED BY ELSEVIER. 8 tangential directions. The final interpolation points and tan- gential directions of FLIRKA at convergence are not known a priori. FLIRKA may end up converging on the interpolation points and tangential directions which are worst for achieving less H -error and vice versa. The fairness of comparison 2;! demands that most (if not all) of the interpolation points and tangential directions of FLPORK and FLIRKA are the same. Therefore, we have used six interpolation points and the tangential directions generated by FLIRKA and iterative rational Krylov algorithm (IRKA) [18] (infinite frequency version of FLIRKA) at convergence in FLPORK and PORK, respectively, for a fair comparison. The desired frequency interval in FLBT, FLIRKA, FFMIRKA, and FLPORK is specified as [0; 8:93] rad/sec corresponding to the frequency of the mode 0:25j8:9339. The frequency-domain error of the ROMs is shown in Fig. 3. It can be seen that FLPORK ensures Fig. 4: Rotor angle of generator-1 of NETS-NYPS test system TABLE II: Comparison of the computational time Method Time (sec) SARQI 6.17 PORK 1.52 FLBT 2.78 FLIRKA 4.93 FFMIRKA 10.96 FLPORK 1.96 TABLE III: Comparison of the simulation time Method Time (sec) Full Order 12.95 SARQI 5.01 PORK 5.10 FLBT 5.03 FLIRKA 5.22 FFMIRKA 6.36 FLPORK 5.15 Fig. 3: Frequency domain error within [0; 2] Hz a good accuracy within the desired frequency region where the 140-bus 40-machine system via Two Tie Lines: In this ex- most poorly damped modes lie. FLBT and FLIRKA are more periment, IEEE 145-bus 50-machine test system is considered accurate than FLPORK in the frequency-domain; however, as the external area, which is connected to the NPCC 140-bus they do not preserve the poorly damped modes of the original 40-machine test system via two tie lines. The NPCC 140-bus system. A 3-phase fault is applied at bus 29 of the study area 40-machine test system is the study area. The bus, line, and at 0:1 sec which is cleared at 0:2 sec, and dynamic simulation machine data of the external and study areas can be found is performed using the Power System Toolbox (PST) [40]. The in [40]. Bus-93 and bus-104 of the IEEE 145-bus 50-machine time domain responses of the original system and the ROMs system are connected to the bus-36 and bus-21, respectively of are shown in Fig. 4. It can be seen that FLPORK also gives the NPCC test system. The linear model for the external area th good accuracy in the time domain. The time consumed by is obtained according to equation (2), which is a 100 order each algorithm to generate the ROM is shown in Table II. model with 4 inputs and 2 outputs. The inputs are the voltage It can be noted that FLPORK is slightly more computational magnitudes and angles on bus-36 and -21 of the NPCC test than PORK due to the computation of the integral F (A) and system, and the outputs are the rotor angles of generator-1 and F (S), but it is efficient as compared to FLBT and FLIRKA. -2 which are connected to bus-93 and -104 of the external area, Although SARQI and FFMIRKA took the most time here respectively. The study area retains its nonlinear description. due to their iterative nature, FLBT is expected to become the The rightmost poles of the external area are plotted in Fig. 5, most expensive as n becomes greater than 2000 due to the and it can be seen that it has several poorly damped modes in th computation of dense large-scale Lyapunov equations. Next, its model. A 12 order ROM of the external area is generated we compare the simulation times of the experiments in Table by SARQI -based modal truncation, PORK, FLIRKA, FLBT, III. It can be noted in Table III and Fig. 4 that the simulation FFMIRKA, and FLPORK. SARQI, PORK, FFMIRKA, and time can significantly be reduced without a significant loss of FLPORK preserve the most poorly damped four interarea and accuracy. two local modes of the original system, i.e., 0:2571j3:936 Test 2: IEEE 145-bus 50-machine system connected to NPCC and 0:2684 j4:765, and 0:1911 11:37, respectively to THIS PAPER IS ACCEPTED FOR PUBLICATION IN INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ELECTRICAL POWER & ENERGY SYSTEMS: DOI: 10.1016/J.IJEPES.2019.105798. COPYRIGHT RESERVED BY ELSEVIER. 9 Fig. 5: The rightmost modes of IEEE 50-machine test system Fig. 7: Rotor angle of generator-1 of IEEE 145-bus 50- machine test system capture the interarea and local oscillations in the ROM. SARQI additionally preserves the following modes: 0:2897j5:097, th 0:4143j5:184, and 0:548j7:7 to make the ROM a 12 order model. Again, we have used six interpolation points and the tangential directions generated by FLIRKA and IRKA [18] in FLPORK and PORK, respectively, for a fair comparison. The desired frequency interval in FLBT, FLIRKA, FFMIRKA, and FLPORK is specified as [0; 11:37] rad/sec corresponding to the frequency of the mode 0:191111:37. The frequency- domain error of the ROMs is shown in Fig. 6. It can be seen Fig. 8: Rotor angle of generator-2 of IEEE 145-bus 50- machine test system significantly be reduced without a significant loss of accuracy. TABLE IV: Comparison of the computational time Method Time (sec) SARQI 9.08 PORK 1.95 FLBT 3.59 Fig. 6: Frequency domain error within [0; 2] Hz FLIRKA 8.19 FFMIRKA 12.01 FLPORK 2.14 that FLPORK ensures a good accuracy within the desired frequency region where the most poorly damped modes lie. A 3-phase fault is applied at bus-36 of the study area at 0:1 TABLE V: Comparison of the simulation time sec which is cleared at 0:5 sec, and dynamic simulation is Method Time (sec) performed using PST [40]. The time domain responses of the Full Order 17.05 original system and the ROMs are shown in Fig. 7 and Fig. 8. SARQI 6.29 PORK 6.31 It can be seen that FLPORK also gives good accuracy in the FLBT 6.10 time domain as well. The time consumed by each algorithm FLIRKA 6.09 to generate the ROM is shown in Table IV. Next, we compare FFMIRKA 7.17 FLPORK 6.33 the simulation times of the experiments in Table V. It can be noted in Table V and Fig. 7-8 that the simulation times can THIS PAPER IS ACCEPTED FOR PUBLICATION IN INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ELECTRICAL POWER & ENERGY SYSTEMS: DOI: 10.1016/J.IJEPES.2019.105798. COPYRIGHT RESERVED BY ELSEVIER. 10 B. Reduced Order Damping Controller Design Test 3: Damping Controller for IEEE 145-bus 50-machine system: In this experiment, the reduced-order damping con- troller design problem for the IEEE 50-machine 145-bus system taken from [40] is considered. The linearized model th of this test system is a 350 order system obtained ac- cording to equations (3)-(10). The four most poorly damped interarea modes are the following: 0:2071  j3:8803 and 0:1945  j3:6916. The important modes of the system are shown in Fig. 9. The H controller design yields a controller Fig. 10: Frequency domain error within [0; 1] Hz FLPORK provides maximum damping. The interarea modes Fig. 9: The rightmost modes of 50-machine test system of the same order as that of the plant which is impractical for the implementation. Therefore, we reduce the original model th and then design the controller using the ROM. A 6 order ROM is constructed using SARQI-based modal truncation, PORK, FLBT, FLIRKA, FFMIRKA, and FLPORK. SARQI, PORK, and FLPORK preserve the following modes of the original system: 0:2071 j3:8803, 0:1945 j3:6916, and 0:0167  j0:5988 while FFMIRKA preserves 0:2071 Fig. 11: Angular velocity deviation in G-21 j3:8803 and 0:1945  j3:6916. The desired frequency in- terval is specified as [0; 3:88] rad/sec corresponding to the frequency of the mode 0:2071  j3:8803. Fig. 10 shows the frequency-domain error of the ROMs (corresponding to output-1). It can be noted that FLPORK ensures a good accuracy within the frequency region, which contains the electromechanical modes of the system. The locations for the damping controller is identified using the participation factor method [43], and it suggests generator-21 (G-21) and generator-24 (G-24) be the appropriate locations. The angular velocity deviations from the reference angular velocity of these two generators are used as the feedback signals and the th control input is added at V . A 6 order decentralized ref H damping controller is designed for each ROM using the approach in [29] which adds damping to the poorly damped interarea modes 0:2071j3:8803 and 0:1945j3:6916. A 10% step change is induced in the mechanical torque of G-21 which in turn induces low-frequency oscillations. The angular Fig. 12: Angular velocity deviation in G-24 velocity deviations in G-21 and G-24 with the open-loop and closed-loop systems are shown in Fig. 11 and Fig. 12. It can be seen that the controller designed using the ROM generated by in the closed-loop systems are tabulated in Table VI. THIS PAPER IS ACCEPTED FOR PUBLICATION IN INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ELECTRICAL POWER & ENERGY SYSTEMS: DOI: 10.1016/J.IJEPES.2019.105798. COPYRIGHT RESERVED BY ELSEVIER. 11 TABLE VI: Interarea modes in the closed-loop systems [9] G. Scarciotti, “Low computational complexity model reduction of power systems with preservation of physical characteristics,” IEEE Transac- No Method Mode % f (Hz) tions on Power Systems, vol. 32, no. 1, pp. 743–752, 2017. Open-loop 0:2071 j3:8803 5:32 0:6176 [10] S. Ghosh and N. Senroy, “Balanced truncation approach to power sys- SARQI 0:3113 j3:9336 7:89 0:6261 tem model order reduction,” Electric Power Components and Systems, PORK 0:3060 j3:8628 9:01 0:6148 vol. 41, no. 8, pp. 747–764, 2013. 1 FLBT 0:3071 j3:9404 7:77 0:6271 [11] Z. Zhu, G. Geng, and Q. Jiang, “Power system dynamic model reduction FLIRKA 0:3123 j3:8380 8:11 0:6108 based on extended krylov subspace method,” IEEE Transactions on FFMIRKA 0:3539 j3:9291 8:97 0:6253 Power Systems, vol. 31, no. 6, pp. 4483–4494, 2016. FLPORK 0:4369 j3:8662 11:23 0:6153 [12] F. D. Freitas, J. Rommes, and N. Martins, “Gramian-based reduction Open-loop 0:1945 j3:6916 5:26 0:5875 method applied to large sparse power system descriptor models,” IEEE SARQI 0:2582 j3:5178 7:32 0:5599 Transactions on Power Systems, vol. 23, no. 3, pp. 1258–1270, 2008. PORK 0:2886 j3:4656 8:30 0:5516 [13] P. Kundur, N. J. Balu, and M. G. Lauby, Power system stability and 2 FLBT 0:2319 j3:7398 6:19 0:5952 control. McGraw-hill New York, 1994, vol. 7. FLIRKA 0:3483 j3:6382 9:53 0:5790 [14] J. J. Sanchez-Gasca and J. H. Chow, “Power system reduction to FFMIRKA 0:3596 j3:6744 9:74 0:5848 simplify the design of damping controllers for interarea oscillations,” FLPORK 0:3803 j3:4302 11:07 0:5459 IEEE Transactions on Power systems, vol. 11, no. 3, pp. 1342–1349, [15] A. Yogarathinam, J. Kaur, and N. R. Chaudhuri, “A new h-irka approach for model reduction with explicit modal preservation: Application on V. CONCLUSION grids with renewable penetration,” IEEE Transactions on Control Sys- In this paper, a frequency-limited MOR technique is pro- tems Technology, no. 99, pp. 1–9, 2017. [16] B. Moore, “Principal component analysis in linear systems: Controllabil- posed which yields a ROM which not only satisfies a subset of ity, observability, and model reduction,” IEEE transactions on automatic the first-order optimality conditions of the problem jjG(j!) control, vol. 26, no. 1, pp. 17–32, 1981. G(j!)jj but also preserves the electromechanical modes [17] D. Wilson, “Optimum solution of model-reduction problem,” in Pro- 2;! ceedings of the Institution of Electrical Engineers, vol. 117, no. 6. IET, of the power system. The proposed algorithm can generate 1970, pp. 1161–1165. an accurate ROM with the desired modes, which ensures a [18] S. Gugercin, A. C. Antoulas, and C. Beattie, “H2 model reduction for good accuracy in the desired frequency interval. The proposed large-scale linear dynamical systems,” SIAM journal on matrix analysis and applications, vol. 30, no. 2, pp. 609–638, 2008. algorithm is applicable to large-scale systems and hence can be [19] J. Kennedy, “Particle swarm optimization,” Encyclopedia of machine used for fast dynamic simulation and reduced order controller learning, pp. 760–766, 2010. design for large-scale power systems. [20] U. Zulfiqar, V. Sreeram, and X. Du, “Finite-frequency power system reduction,” International Journal of Electrical Power & Energy Systems, vol. 113, pp. 35–44, 2019. ACKNOWLEDGMENT [21] D. Petersson and J. Lofber ¨ g, “Model reduction using a frequency-limited h2-cost,” Systems & Control Letters, vol. 67, pp. 32–39, 2014. The first author would like to thank M. A. Pai of the [22] P. Vuillemin, “Frequency-limited model approximation of large-scale University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, USA dynamical models,” Ph.D. dissertation, ISAE-Institut Superieur ´ de for explaining his work [5], [35], and answering several l’Aeronautique ´ et de l’Espace, 2014. [23] M. I. Ahmad, “Krylov subspace techniques for model reduction and the questions related to power system modeling for MOR done solution of linear matrix equations,”, Ph.D. dissertation, Imperial College in his students’ work [38], [39]. This work was supported by London, 2011. National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant [24] T. Wolf, “H pseudo-optimal model order reduction,” Ph.D. dissertation, Technische Universitat ¨ Munchen, ¨ 2014. (No. 61873336, 61873335), and supported in part by 111 [25] W. Gawronski and J.-N. Juang, “Model reduction in limited time and Project (No. D18003). frequency intervals,” International Journal of Systems Science, vol. 21, no. 2, pp. 349–376, 1990. [26] P. Vuillemin, C. Poussot-Vassal, and D. Alazard, “H2 optimal and REFERENCES frequency limited approximation methods for large-scale lti dynamical systems,” IFAC Proceedings Volumes, vol. 46, no. 2, pp. 719–724, 2013. [1] C. Sturk, L. Vanfretti, Y. Chompoobutrgool, and H. Sandberg, [27] G. Rogers, Power system oscillations. Springer Science & Business “Coherency-independent structured model reduction of power systems,” Media, 2012. IEEE Transactions on Power Systems, vol. 29, no. 5, pp. 2418–2426, [28] B. Pal and B. Chaudhuri, Robust control in power systems. Springer Science & Business Media, 2006. [2] J. H. Chow, Power system coherency and model reduction, ser. Power [29] S. Furuya, J. Irisawa et al., “A robust H power system stabilizer Electronics and Power Systems. New York, NY, USA: Springer, 2013. 1 design using reduced-order models,” International Journal of Electrical [3] C. Huang, K. Zhang, X. Dai, and W. Wang, “Model reduction of power Power & Energy Systems, vol. 28, no. 1, pp. 21–28, 2006. systems based on the balanced residualization method,” in 2012 IEEE [30] H. K. Panzer, “Model order reduction by krylov subspace methods Power and Energy Society General Meeting. IEEE, 2012, pp. 1–7. with global error bounds and automatic choice of parameters,” Ph.D. [4] G. Scarciotti, “Model reduction of power systems with preservation of dissertation, Technische Universitat ¨ Munchen, ¨ 2014. slow and poorly damped modes,” in 2015 IEEE Power & Energy Society [31] J. Rommes, N. Martins, and F. D. Freitas, “Computing rightmost General Meeting. IEEE, 2015, pp. 1–5. eigenvalues for small-signal stability assessment of large-scale power [5] D. Chaniotis and M. Pai, “Model reduction in power systems us- systems,” IEEE transactions on power systems, vol. 25, no. 2, pp. 929– ing krylov subspace methods,” IEEE Transactions on Power Systems, 938, 2010. vol. 20, no. 2, pp. 888–894, 2005. [32] F. TP462, “Identification of electromechanical modes in power systems,” [6] R. Nath, S. S. Lamba, and K. P. Rao, “Coherency based system decomposition into study and external areas using weak coupling,” IEEE IEEE Task Force Report, 2012. Transactions on Power Apparatus and Systems, no. 6, pp. 1443–1449, [33] J. Rommes and N. Martins, “Efficient computation of multivariable 1985. transfer function dominant poles using subspace acceleration,” IEEE [7] R. Podmore, “Identification of coherent generators for dynamic equiva- transactions on power systems, vol. 21, no. 4, pp. 1471–1483, 2006. lents,” IEEE Transactions on Power Apparatus and Systems, no. 4, pp. [34] P. Benner, P. Kurschner ¨ , and J. Saak, “Frequency-limited balanced 1344–1354, 1978. truncation with low-rank approximations,” SIAM Journal on Scientific [8] R. De Mello, R. Podmore, and K. Stanton, “Coherency-based dynamic Computing, vol. 38, no. 1, pp. A471–A499, 2016. equivalents: Applications in transient stability studies,” in Proc. PICA [35] S. Liu, P. W. Sauer, D. Chaniotis, and M. Pai, “Krylov subspace and Conf, 1975, pp. 23–31. balanced truncation methods for power system model reduction,” in THIS PAPER IS ACCEPTED FOR PUBLICATION IN INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ELECTRICAL POWER & ENERGY SYSTEMS: DOI: 10.1016/J.IJEPES.2019.105798. COPYRIGHT RESERVED BY ELSEVIER. 12 Power System Coherency and Model Reduction. Springer, 2013, pp. 119–142. [36] P. W. Sauer and M. A. Pai, Power system dynamics and stability. Prentice hall Upper Saddle River, NJ, 1998, vol. 101. [37] P. M. Anderson and A. A. Fouad, Power system control and stability. John Wiley & Sons, 2008. [38] S. Liu, “Dynamic-data driven real-time identification for electric power systems,” Ph.D. dissertation, University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign, 2009. [39] D. Chaniotis, “Krylov subspace methods in power system studies,” Ph.D. dissertation, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2001. [40] J. H. Chow and K. W. Cheung, “A toolbox for power system dynamics and control engineering education and research,” IEEE transactions on Power Systems, vol. 7, no. 4, pp. 1559–1564, 1992. [41] S. E. G. Sanchez, Applications of Krylov Subspace and Balanced Truncation Model Order Reduction in Power Systems. University of Arkansas, 2017. [42] D. Lee, “Ieee recommended practice for excitation system models for power system stability studies (ieee std 421.5-1992),” Energy Devel- opment and Power Generating Committee of the Power Engineering Society, vol. 95, no. 96, 1992. [43] Y.-Y. Hsu and C.-L. Chen, “Identification of optimum location for stabiliser applications using participation factors,” in IEE Proceedings C (Generation, Transmission and Distribution), vol. 134, no. 3. IET, 1987, pp. 238–244. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Electrical Engineering and Systems Science arXiv (Cornell University)

Frequency-Limited Pseudo-Optimal Rational Krylov Algorithm for Power System Reduction

Loading next page...
 
/lp/arxiv-cornell-university/frequency-limited-pseudo-optimal-rational-krylov-algorithm-for-power-tyOVRhk2I9
ISSN
0142-0615
eISSN
ARCH-3348
DOI
10.1016/j.ijepes.2019.105798
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

THIS PAPER IS ACCEPTED FOR PUBLICATION IN INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ELECTRICAL POWER & ENERGY SYSTEMS: DOI: 10.1016/J.IJEPES.2019.105798. COPYRIGHT RESERVED BY ELSEVIER. 1 Frequency-Limited Pseudo-Optimal Rational Krylov Algorithm for Power System Reduction Umair Zulfiqar, Victor Sreeram, and Xin Du Abstract—In this paper, a computationally efficient frequency- not reduced. On the other hand, the portion whose effect limited model reduction algorithm is presented for large-scale on the analysis in the study area is only of the interest is interconnected power systems. The algorithm generates a reduced mathematically described by a linear model, and it constitutes order model which not only preserves the electromechanical the external area; see Fig. 1. MOR is applied to the linear modes of the original power system but also satisfies a subset model of the external area. For instance, not only that a of the first-order optimality conditions for H model reduction 2;! problem within the desired frequency interval. The reduced order linear model suffice in the small-signal stability analysis and model accurately captures the oscillatory behavior of the original damping controller design, it can be further reduced using power system and provides a good time- and frequency-domain MOR techniques without a significant loss of accuracy [28]. accuracy. The proposed algorithm enables fast simulation, anal- ysis, and damping controller design for the original large-scale power system. The efficacy of the proposed algorithm is validated on benchmark power system examples. Index Terms—Electromechanical modes, Krylov subspace, Modal preservation, Model reduction, Power system oscillations. I. I NTRODUCTION ODAY’S power system is a large network of intercon- nected power apparatus like generators, lines, and buses that covers a large geographical territory. There is a growing trend to facilitate further interconnections with neighboring systems, and thus the size of the interconnected power system network is likely to continue to increase. The mathematical Fig. 1: Partitioning of power system for MOR representation of these large-scale power system networks can easily reach several thousands of differential equations. This poses a challenge for fast and efficient simulation, analysis, The coherency-based MOR methods have been historically and control system design for these large-scale power systems employed to obtain a dynamically equivalent ROM [6]-[8]. despite a significant growth in the storage and computational The response of coherent generators is similar to a particular capabilities in recent time [1]. Model order reduction (MOR) set of inputs. The first step in the coherency-based MOR tech- offers a solution to the problem by providing a reduced order niques is to identify and group the coherent set of generators model (ROM), which enables fast simulation and control and construct a lumped system. A ROM is then obtained from system design without significantly affecting the accuracy. the lumped model by exploiting the physical properties of MOR is generally referred to as “dynamic equivalency” in electrical machines connected to the power system network. the power system literature [2]. The dependence on physical properties restricts the flexible The analysis of a complete power system network with every applicability of these methods. Recently, an increasing interest subtle detail is neither practical nor required. In the MOR of in MOR techniques which rely on the mathematical properties power systems, the power system is first partitioned according instead of the physical properties of the power system appa- to the importance [1]-[6]. The portion of the power system ratus is shown by the power system community [4], [9]. For under investigation, which contains the important variables, instance, balanced truncation and moment matching have been constitutes the study area, and it is mathematically described successfully used in power system reduction, showing some by a detailed nonlinear model. Note that this study area is promising results [10]-[12]. The power systems exhibit local and interarea oscillations U. Zulfiqar and V. Sreeram are with the School of Electrical, Electronics in the frequency region between 0:8 2 Hz and 0:1 0:7 and Computer Engineering, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hz, respectively [13]. These are associated with the poorly Highway, Crawley, WA 6009 (email: umair.zulfiqar@research.uwa.edu.au, victor.sreeram@uwa.edu.au). damped modes of the power system model and are often X. Du is with the School of Mechatronic Engineering and Automation, called “electromechanical or critical modes”. These modes Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072, China, and also with the Shanghai Key are crucial for small-signal stability analysis and for the Laboratory of Power Station Automation Technology, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444, P.R. China (e-mail: duxin@shu.edu.cn) damping controller design. Therefore, these modes must be arXiv:1910.02374v2 [eess.SY] 27 Jan 2020 THIS PAPER IS ACCEPTED FOR PUBLICATION IN INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ELECTRICAL POWER & ENERGY SYSTEMS: DOI: 10.1016/J.IJEPES.2019.105798. COPYRIGHT RESERVED BY ELSEVIER. 2 preserved in the ROM to retain the oscillatory behavior of the propose a computationally efficient MOR algorithm that en- original model. The frequency response of the ROM should sures a good accuracy in the specified frequency region with closely match that of the original system within 0:1 2 Hz. explicit modal preservation. Unlike [20], a fairly compact The importance of good frequency-domain accuracy within ROM can be obtained using the proposed algorithm, and the 0:1 2 Hz has been recognized consistently in the literature; order of ROM can even be equal to the number of modes see for instance [5], [14]. In [5], the ROM interpolates the to be preserved. The algorithm uses a moment matching original system at and around zero frequency to effectively approach based on the parametrized family of ROM [23] capture these oscillations in the frequency-domain. In [14], it and generates a ROM which satisfies a subset of the first- is suggested to retain the critical modes in the ROM to preserve order optimality conditions for frequency-limited H -MOR the oscillation associated with these modes. problem [22]. Unlike [21] and [22], the proposed algorithm The preservation of slow and poorly damped modes in the is iteration-free and does not requires the solutions of large- ROM is beneficial from the damping controller design per- scale Lyapunov equations, LMIs, and pole-residue form. The spective [14], and it also improves the accuracy of the ROM performance of the proposed algorithm is tested by considering in the time-domain [4], [9], [15]. Most of the MOR algorithms benchmark power system reduction problems. used for power system reduction like balanced truncation [16] and moment matching [5] do not have modal preservation property. It is customary to increase the order of ROM in II. P RELIMINARIES these algorithms in a hope to capture the poorly damped critical modes of the original system in the ROM. This popular belief has recently been refuted in [4], and it is argued that Consider an e -machine, k-bus system as the external area there is no guarantee to capture these modes in the ROM by which is connected to p-buses of the study area via p-tie lines. increasing the order. It is further shown that the quality of The external area can be described by the following second- the ROM can be improved by preserving the slow and poorly order classical model [35] used for power system reduction damped modes instead of increasing its order [4]. In [15], for i = 1; ; e , i.e., an H -MOR algorithm is proposed for power systems that includes modal preservation as a cost function of its optimality = !  ! i i s criteria. The algorithm does preserve the electromechanical modes in the ROM, but the first-order optimality conditions 2H !  = T D (!  !  ) i i i i s (as defined in [17], [18]) of H -MOR are no longer satisfied with this heuristic modification in [18]. It gives good frequency n E E G cos(  ) + E B sin(  ) and time domain accuracy, but the excessive computational i j ij i j j ij i j j=1 cost associated with the particle swarm optimization tech- nique [19] makes it unsuitable for large-scale systems. In X E V G cos(  ) + V B sin(  ) : (1) [20], the power system reduction is considered as a finite- i j ij i j j ij i j j=1 frequency MOR problem with an additional constraint that the electromechanical modes of the systems are preserved in the ROM. The algorithm is computationally efficient, but the H , D ,  , !  , E , and T are the inertial coefficient, damping i i i i i i ROM of acceptable accuracy is not that compact because it coefficient, rotor angle, angular velocity, internal voltage, and uses modal truncation to preserve critical modes. The order mechanical input power respectively of the machine i of the of ROM should be significantly larger than the number of external area. !  is the reference angular velocity. V and s j j modes to be preserved. The accuracy in the specified frequency are the voltage magnitude and angle on the p-buses of the region is obtained by using frequency-dependent extended study area. The admittance G +jB connects machine i with ij ij realization of the original system. MOR is applied to this machine j, and the admittance G + jB connects machine ij ij extended realization, and the ROM is obtained via an inverse i with the boundary bus j. The nonlinear model in equation transformation. In [21], the optimal frequency-limited H - (1) can be linearized around an equilibrium point to obtain a th MOR problem is considered, and an algorithm is proposed, n order state-space model, i.e., which generates an optimal ROM. The algorithm requires the solution of Lyapunov equations and linear matrix inequalities (LMIs) to find the optimal ROM, which is not feasible in a = A + B ;  = C : (2) !  V ! !  j large-scale setting. In [22], the problem is described as bi- tangential Hermite interpolation, which can be solved in a computationally efficient way. However, the original system is The inputs are the angles and magnitudes of the voltages on the required to be converted into pole-residue form, which is again p buses of the study area, which are connected to the external computationally not feasible in a large-scale setting. Moreover, area. The outputs are the rotor angle of the p generators of the both the algorithm [21] and [22] are iterative algorithms with external area, which are connected to the study area. The step- no guarantee on the convergence, and they do not have a modal wise procedure to generate equilibrium points and to reach preservation property. equation (2) can be found in [36]-[39]. In this paper, we consider the same problem of [20] and The nonlinear model (which is used for the damping controller THIS PAPER IS ACCEPTED FOR PUBLICATION IN INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ELECTRICAL POWER & ENERGY SYSTEMS: DOI: 10.1016/J.IJEPES.2019.105798. COPYRIGHT RESERVED BY ELSEVIER. 3 TABLE I: Mathematical Notations design in this paper) is given by the following equations: Notation Meaning = !  !  ; (3) i i s Hermitian of the matrix. Re() Real part of the matrix. 2H 0 0 0 0 () Eigenvalues of the matrix. !  = T (E X I )I (E + X I )I ; (4) i i i di qi qi di qi di di qi s Ran() Range of the matrix. 0 span fg Span of the set of r vectors. (X X )I E qi di di fdi _0 di i=1; ;r E = + ; (5) qi 0 0 0 jjjj H -norm of the system. H 2 doi doi doi jjjj Frequency-limited H -norm of the system. H 2 2;! (X X )I qi qi qi L[] Frechet ´ derivative of the matrix logarithm. _0 di E = ; (6) di 0 0 qoi qoi K + S (E ) E ~ V ~ Ei Ei fdi fdi Ri points in the respective tangential directions, i.e., G( )t = i i E = + ; (7) fdi T T G( )t if the input rational Krylov subspace V is given by Ei Di i i K R K K E V 1 Ai Fi Ai Fi fdi Ri _ ~ ~ Ran(V ) = span f( I A) Bt g: (13) V = + i i Ri i=1; ;r T T T T Ai Fi Ai Ai K (V V + V ) Ai ref i s i i G(s) interpolates G(s) at the interpolation points in the + ; (8) respective tangential directions for any output rational Krylov ~ ~ ~ ~ subspace W such that W V = I . Choose any W , for instance, R K E F F fdi i i R = + : (9) i ~ ~ W = V , and compute the following matrices T T T T T ~ ~  ~ ~  ~ E = W V ; A = W AV ; B = W B; (14) Equations (3)-(5) describe the dynamics of the machines where 0 0 1 E , I , X , and  are the emfs, currents, reactances, and B = B V E B; (15) di di ? di doi time constants for the d-axis of the machine i; E , I , X , T 1 T 1 qi qi ~ ~ ~ qi C = (B B ) B AV V E A ; (16) t ? ? ? and  are the emfs, currents, reactances, and time constants qoi S = E A BC : (17) for the q-axis of the machine i; and E is the emf across fdi the field winding of machine i. Equations (6)-(9) describe Then V satisfies the following Sylvester equation: the dynamics of the exciter, and the detailed description of ~ ~ ~ AV + V (S) + B(C ) = 0 the definitions of the parameters used in equations (6)-(9) can be found in [42]. The nonlinear equations (3)-(9) can be where f ; ;  g are the eigenvalues of S. If the pair 1 r th ~ ~ ~ linearized to obtain a n order linear model, i.e., (S; C ) is observable, the ROM obtained with V and W can be parameterized in  to obtain a family of ROMs which satisfy x _ = Ax + Bu; y = C x: (10) ~ ~ the interpolation condition G( )t = G( )t , i.e., i i i i where ~ ~ ~ ~ A = S + C B =  C = CV: 0 0 1 T ~ ~ ~ !  E E E V R x = ; i i fdi Ri F If  is set to  = Q C where Q solves qi di i t t t T T T ~ ~ ~ ~ (S )Q + Q (S) + C C = 0; t t t u = T V , and y =  . i ref i th Let G(s) be the n order power system model with m inputs ~ it ensures that G(s) is a pseudo-optimal ROM for the problem and p outputs, i.e., ~ jjG(s) G(s)jj which satisfies the subset of first-order optimality conditions [18], i.e., G(s) = C (sI A) B: (11) 2 2 2 ~ ~ jjG(s) G(s)jj = jjG(s)jj jjG(s)jj : H H H th 2 2 2 The power system reduction problem is to find an r (r << n) order ROM G(s) of the original model G(s) such that B. Frequency-Limited Balanced Truncation (FLBT) [25] the error jjG(s) G(s)jj is small in some defined sense. In [25], a frequency-limited generalization of balanced The projection based MOR techniques construct reduction truncation [16] is presented which allows the user to spec- ~ ~ subspaces V and W , and the original system is projected onto ify the desired frequency region wherein superior accuracy that reduced subspace such that the dominant characteristics is required. In FLBT [25], the standard controllability and of the original system are retained in the ROM, i.e., observability Gramians, which are defined over the infinite T 1 T ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ frequency range, are replaced with the ones defined over the G(s) = CV (sI W AV ) W B frequency region of interest. Let P and Q be the frequency- 1 ! ! ~ ~ ~ = C (sI A) B: (12) limited controllability and observability Gramains respectively The important mathematical notations which are used through- defined over the desired frequency interval [!; !] rad/sec, out the text are tabulated in Table I. i.e., 1 T T 1 P = (jI A) BB (jI A ) d A. Pseudo-Optimal Rational Krylov (PORK) Algorithm [24] ! T 1 T 1 Let  be the interpolation points in the tangential directions i Q = (jI A ) C C (jI A) d m1 2 t 2 R . Then G(s) interpolates G(s) at the interpolation ! i THIS PAPER IS ACCEPTED FOR PUBLICATION IN INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ELECTRICAL POWER & ENERGY SYSTEMS: DOI: 10.1016/J.IJEPES.2019.105798. COPYRIGHT RESERVED BY ELSEVIER. 4 which solve the following Lyapunov equations: is computationally expensive and cannot be applied to large- scale systems. In [22], the Gramian based optimality condi- T T T T AP + P A + F (A)BB + BB F (A) = 0 ! ! tions (19)-(21) are transformed into interpolation conditions; T T T T A Q + Q A + F (A) C C + C CF (A) = 0 ! ! however, the iterative algorithm presented to achieve the local optimality requires the original system to be in pole-residue where form which is only feasible for small-scale systems. Moreover, there is no guarantee on the convergence of the algorithm. F (A) = (jI A) d (18) In [26], a heuristic algorithm is presented, which produces a ROM with less H -error, i.e., frequency-limited iterative 2;! = Re ln(j!I A) : rational Krylov algorithm (FLIRKA). Again, the convergence is not guaranteed in FLIRKA as well. The similarity transformation matrix T is computed from P ! ! 1 T and Q as a contragradient transformation, i.e., T P T = ! ! ! ! T Q T = diag(  ;   ; ;   ) where ! ! 1 2 n 1 2 III. M AIN WORK . The states associated with the least value of frequency- ~ ~ limited Hankel singular values   are truncated. V and W The analytical damping controller design procedures like T T T ~ ~ ~ ~ LQG and H result in a controller whose order is greater in FLBT are computed as V = T Z and W = T Z ; ! 1 than or equal to that of the power system model. To obtain a respectively where Z = I 0 . rr r(nr) lower order controller, a ROM of the original model is first sought using MOR [27]-[29]. It is stressed in [14] that the C. Frequency-Limited H -Optimal MOR ROM should preserve the critical modes and the frequency- In [21], a nonlinear optimization-based MOR algorithm domain behavior of the original system over the frequencies is presented to achieve the local optimality for the problem associated with the critical modes. These modes are generally jjG(s) G(s)jj where 2;! poorly damped and can cause unstable operating conditions under heavy power transfers. Thus, the preservation of their jjG(s) G(s)jj 2;! identity in the ROM is critical for a good damping controller 2 2 T ~ ^ ~ = jjG(s)jj +jjG(s)jj 2 trace(CP C ) H H design that adds damping to these modes [14]. Moreover, 2;! 2;! 2 2 T ~ ~ ^ it is shown in [4], [9], [15] that the preservation of these = jjG(s)jj +jjG(s)jj 2 trace(B Q B); H H 2;! 2;! modes also improves the accuracy in the time-domain. We 2 T jjG(s)jj = trace G(j)G(j) d present a MOR algorithm for the power system reduction 2;! problem under consideration which not only preserves the specified modes of the original system, but it also ensures = trace G(j) G(j) d ! superior accuracy within the frequency region specified by the user. The proposed algorithm generates a ROM which = trace(CP C ) T satisfies a subset of the optimality conditions (19)-(21). We = trace(B Q B); call a ROM which satisfies either (19) or (20) as a frequency- and limited pseudo-optimal ROM, and we name our algorithm as “Frequency-limited Pseudo-optimal Rational Krylov algorithm T T T T ^ ^ ~ ~ ~ ~ AP + P A + F (A)BB + BB F (A) = 0 ! ! (FLPORK)”. FLPORK generates a ROM which has poles at T T T T ~ ^ ^ ~ ~ ~ A Q + Q A + F (A) C C + C CF (A) = 0: ! ! the desired locations specified by the user. G(s) is a local optimum for this problem if the following first-order optimality conditions are satisfied: A. FLPORK ^ ~ ~ Q B = Q B (19) We now present an algorithm that generates a frequency- ! ! limited pseudo-optimal ROM of G(s). Let  be the interpo- ^ ~ ~ CP = CP (20) ! ! m1 lation points in the tangential directions t 2 R . Define ^ ^ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ^ Q P + Q P = Re L[A j!I;V ] (21) B , G (s), G (s), S, C , and C as ! ! ! ! ! ! ! t t where B = B F (A)B ; G (s) = C (sI A) B ; ! ! ! 1  1 T T T ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ G (s) = CV (sI W AV ) W B = C (sI A) B ; AP + P A + F (A)BB + BB F (A) = 0; (22) ! ! ! ! ! T T T T ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ S = diag( ; ;  ); C = t  t ; 1 r t 1 r A Q + Q A + F (A) C C + C CF (A) = 0; (23) ! ! T T ~ ~ ~ ~ ^ C F (S) V = C CP C CP : (24) ! ! ^ C = = c ^  c ^ : (25) t 1 r When G(s) satisfies either (19) or (20), the following holds ~ ~ G (s) interpolates G (s), i.e., G ( )c ^ = G ( )c ^ for any 2 2 2 ! ! ! i i ! i i ~ ~ jjG(s) G(s)jj = jjG(s)jj jjG(s)jj : H H H 2;! 2;! 2;! ~ ~ ~ W such that W V = I if The nonlinear optimization algorithm to achieve a ROM which 1 1 V = (A  I ) B c ^  (A  I ) B c ^ : (26) 1 ! 1 r ! r satisfies the above-mentioned first-order optimality conditions THIS PAPER IS ACCEPTED FOR PUBLICATION IN INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ELECTRICAL POWER & ENERGY SYSTEMS: DOI: 10.1016/J.IJEPES.2019.105798. COPYRIGHT RESERVED BY ELSEVIER. 5 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ From the relation of Krylov subspaces and Sylvester equations Due to uniqueness, Q P Q = Q , Q P = I , and s! ! s! s! s! ! ~ ~ ~ [30], it can be noted that V solves the following Sylvester P = (Q ) . ! s! equation: (iii) Consider the following equation: ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ AV P + V P A + F (A)BB + BB F (A) ! ! ~ ~ ^ AV + V (S) + B (C ) = 0: (27) ! t ~ ^ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ = [V S + B C ]P + V P [(Q ) S Q ] ! t ! ! s! s! ~ ~ ~ ~ F (A)BC P BC F (S)P If all the eigenvalues of S have a positive real part and the t ! t ! ^ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ pair (S; C ) is observable, (A; B ; C ) obtained with V and W ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ t ! = V SP + F (A)BC P + BC F (S)P V SP ! t ! t ! ! can be parameterized in  to obtain a family of ROMs [23], ~ ~ ~ ~ F (A)BC P BC F (S)P t ! t ! i.e., = 0: ~ ^ ~ ~ ~ A = S + C ; B = ; C = CV (28) t ! ~ ~ ^ ^ ~ ~ Due to uniqueness, V P = P , and thus, CP = CP . ! ! ! ! ~ ~ ~ (iv) A = (Q ) (S )(Q ) is actually the spectral fac- s! s! ~ T which satisfy the interpolation condition G ( )c ^ = 1 ~ ~ ~ ! i i ~ ~ torization of A. Moveover, B = (Q ) t  t . s! 1 r G ( )c ^ . This can be readily verified by multiplying (27) ! i i ~ Thus, t is the input-residual of G(s). with W from the left; see [30]. Set  to A dual result also exists wherein W is fixed with an 1  1 ~ ~ ~ ~ = (Q ) C (Q ) F (S)C (29) ~ s! s! t t arbitrary choice of V , and then the ROM is parameterized to achieve frequency-limited pseudo-optimality. We call it where Output-FLPORK (O-FLPORK) to differentiate with the previous case. There is some abuse in the mathematical ~ ~ (S )Q + Q (S)+ notations, but the context leaves no ambiguity. Let  be the s! s! i 1p interpolation points in the tangential directions t 2 R . ~ ~ ~ ~ i F (S)C C + C C F (S) = 0: (30) t t t t ~ ^ Define C , G (s), G (s), S, B , and B as ! ! ! t t ~ ~ ~ Then, ROM (A; B; C ) in FLPORK is obtained by removing C C = ; G (s) = C (sI A) B; ! ! ! ~ ~ ~ (Q ) F (S)C from B , i.e., CF (A) s! ! ~  1  1 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ G (s) = C V (sI W AV ) W B = C (sI A) B; ! ! ! 1  1 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ A = S (Q ) C C F (S) (Q ) F (S)C C ; s! t s! t t t ^ ^ S = diag( ; ;  ) B = t  t 1 r t 1  1 r ~ ~ ~ ~ B = (Q ) C ; C = CV: (31) s! ~ ~ ^ ^ B = F (S)B B = b  b : (32) t t 1 r ~ ~ ~ Theorem 1: If (A; B; C ) is defined as in equation (31), then ~ ~ ^  ^ G (s) interpolates G (s), i.e., b G ( ) = b G ( ) for any ! ! i ! i i ! i G(s) has the following properties: ~ ~ ~ V such that W V = I if (i) G(s) has poles at the mirror images of the interpolation ~ ^ ^ points  . i W = (A  I ) C b  (A  I ) C b : (33) 1 r ! 1 ! r (ii) (Q ) is the frequency-limited controllability Gramian s! From the relation of Krylov subspaces and Sylvester equations ~ ~ of the pair (A; B). [30], it can be noted that W solves the following Sylvester ^ ~ ~ (iii) CP = CP . ! ! equation: (iv) t is the input-residual of G(s). Proof: (i) By multiplying (Q ) from the left side of ~ ~ ^ s! W A + (S)W + (B )(C ) = 0: (34) t ! equation (30) yields If all the eigenvalues of S have positive real part and the pair ^ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 1  1   (S; B ) is controllable, (A; B; C ) obtained with V and W ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ t ! (Q ) S Q S + (Q ) F (S)C C s! s! s! t can be parameterized in  to obtain a family of ROMs which ~ ~ ~ + (Q ) C C F (S) = 0 ~ s! t t ^  ^ satisfy the interpolation condition b G ( ) = b G ( ) [23], i ! i i ! i ~ ~ ~ (Q ) S Q A = 0: i.e., s! s! ~ ^ ~ ~ ~ A = S + B ; B = W B; C = : (35) t ! ~ ~ ~ ~ Thus A = (Q S Q and hence  (A) =  (S ). s! i i s!) This can be readily verified by multiplying (34) with V from (ii) The frequency-limited controllability Gramian P of ~ ~ the right. Set  to the pair (A; B) solves equation (22). By pre- and post- ~ ~ multiplying equation (22) with Q , by putting A = s!  1 ~ ~ B (P ) s! 1  1 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ = (36) (Q ) S Q and B = (Q ) C , and also by noting s! s! s! t   1 ~ ~ B F (S)(P ) s! 1  t ~ ~ ~ that Q F (A)(Q ) = F (S), equation (22) becomes s! s! where ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ (S )Q P Q + Q P Q (S) ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ s! ! s! s! ! s! (S)P + P (S ) + F (S)B B + B B F (S) = 0: s! s! t t t t ~ ~ ~ ~ + F (S)C C + C C F (S) = 0: (37) t t t t THIS PAPER IS ACCEPTED FOR PUBLICATION IN INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ELECTRICAL POWER & ENERGY SYSTEMS: DOI: 10.1016/J.IJEPES.2019.105798. COPYRIGHT RESERVED BY ELSEVIER. 6 ~ ~ ~ Then, ROM (A; B; C ) in O-FLPORK is obtained by removing FLIRKA ensures good H accuracy if the convergence is 2;! ~ ~ ~ B F (S)(P ) from C , i.e., achieved. Note that FLIRKA is proposed heuristically based s! ! on experimental results. FLPORK and O-FLPORK can thus be 1   1 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ A = S F (S)B B P B B F (S)P ; t t t s! t s! seen as iteration-free algorithms which judiciously place the ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ B = W B; C = B P : (38) poles of G(s) at the mirror images of the interpolation points t s! make the tangential directions as input and output residuals ~ ~ ~ Theorem 2: If (A; B; C ) is defined as in equation (38), then respectively. Therefore, FLPORK and O-FLPORK satisfy (39) G(s) has the following properties: and (40), respectively. (i) G(s) has poles at the mirror images of the interpolation points  . C. Choice of Modes to be Preserved (ii) (P ) is the frequency-limited observability Gramian s! ~ ~ There is no theoretical guarantee that preserving a particular of the pair (A; C ). ^ ~ ~ mode of the original system will surely ensure less error. (iii) Q B = Q B. ! ! ^ However, some general and practical guidelines regarding the (iv) t is the output-residual of G(s). preservation of the “right” set of modes of the original system Proof: The proof is similar to that of Theorem 1 and hence are reported in the literature. For instance, it is suggested in omitted for brevity. [14] to preserve the local and interarea modes in the ROM for accurately capturing the local and interarea oscillations. This Remark 1: If the interpolation points are selected as is particularly important when the ROM is used for obtaining the mirror images of r specified electromechanical poles a damping controller to reduce the local and interarea oscilla- of G(s), the ROM preserves these modes. Moreover, if ! tions. It is argued in [4], [9] that a good time-domain accuracy is selected such that [!; !] contains the frequency region can be achieved if the slowest and most poorly damped modes wherein the local and interarea oscillations lie, the ROM of the original model are preserved in the ROM. The lightly accurately captures these oscillations in its frequency-domain damped modes in the frequency range [0; 2] Hz are called response. electromechanical modes [32] and can easily be captured using Remark 2: For simplicity, it is assumed throughout the paper Subspace Accelerated Rayleigh Quotient Iteration (SARQI) that the desired frequency interval is [!; !]. However, it can algorithm [31]. The peaks and dips in the frequency response be any symmetric interval, i.e., [! ;! ][ [! ; ! ] rad/sec 2 1 1 2 of a system are associated with the modes with large residuals where ! > ! > 0. In that case, F (A) and F (S) become 2 1 Z Z which can be easily captured using Subspace Accelerated ! ! 2 1 1 1 MIMO Dominant Pole Algorithm (SAMDP) [33]. It is shown F (A) = (jI A) d (jI A) d ! ! 2 1 in [33] that the preservation of these modes in the ROM yields Z Z ! ! 2 1 overall good accuracy over the entire frequency range. These 1 1 F (S) = (jI + S) d (jI + S) d : 2 guidelines should be followed when choosing the interpolation ! ! 2 1 points in FLPORK and O-FLPORK to obtain a high-fidelity ROM. B. Connection with FLIRKA [26] Let G(s) be the ROM obtained after FLIRKA converges, D. Algorithmic Aspects and it is represented by the following pole-residue form We allowed the state-space matrices to be complex in the l r ~ previous subsection; however, one can obtain a real ROM for a G(s) = : real original model. F (A) is a real matrix when the desired fre- i=1 quency region is symmetric [21], [34] [! ;! ][[! ; ! ] , 2 1 1 2 Then the reduction subspaces generated by FLIRKA in the last i.e., iteration ensure that the following interpolatory conditions are satisfied: F (A) = Re ln (j! I + A) (j! I + A) : 1 2 G ( )r ^ = G ( )r ^ (39) ! i i ! i i This leads to a real B . The real S and C can be obtained ! t ^  ^ ^ ~ l G ( ) = l G ( ) (40) from equations (13)-(17) which lead to the real C , Q , and ! i ! i i i t s! V . Finally, the ROM is obtained as where 1 T 1 T ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ A = Q S Q ; B = Q C ; s! s! s! t r   r   F (D) i r r ^  r ^ = 1 r ~ ~ r   r  C = CV : i r 2 3 2 2 3 2 33 l l l 1 i i Similarly, C is a real matrix when the desired frequency 6 7 6 6 7 6 77 . . . region is symmetric, i.e., [! ;! ][[! ; ! ]. The real S and . = F (D) . . 2 1 1 2 4 5 4 4 5 4 55 . . . B which have the information of the interpolation points t i l l l r r and tangential directions t encoded in them can be computed D = diag( ; ;  ): 1 r by the following steps. Compute W as ~ T 1 T T In other words, G(s) is an input- and output- frequency- ^ Ran(W ) = span f( I A ) C t g: i=1; ;r limited pseudo optimal ROM. This explains the reason why THIS PAPER IS ACCEPTED FOR PUBLICATION IN INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ELECTRICAL POWER & ENERGY SYSTEMS: DOI: 10.1016/J.IJEPES.2019.105798. COPYRIGHT RESERVED BY ELSEVIER. 7 Choose any V , for instance, V = W . Then compute the iterative rational Krylov algorithm (FFMIRKA) [20] both following matrices in the frequency and time domains on two power system reduction problems. Next, we design a reduced-order H T T E = W V ; A = W AV ; C = CV ; damping controller for the IEEE 145-bus 50-machine system 1 T C = C CE W ? using FLPORK and compare its performance with SARQI [31] T 1 T T T 1 -based modal truncation, PORK [24], FLIRKA [26], FLBT B = W A AE W C (C C ) t ? ? ? [25], and FFMIRKA [20]. The results of O-FLPORK are S = A B C E : indistinguishable from FLPORK, and hence, only results of ~ ^ ~ ~ FLPORK are shown. All the experiments are performed on a The real S and B lead to the real B , P , and W . Then the t t s! laptop with Intel Core M-5Y10c processor, 8GB of RAM, and ROM is obtained as Windows 8 operating system. T 1 T ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ A = P S P ; B = W B; s! s! T 1 ~ ~ ~ C = B P : t s! A. Power System Reduction Test 1: NETS-NYPS connected to IEEE 145-bus 50- E. Computational Aspects machine system via One Tie Line: In this experiment, the FLBT [25] becomes computationally expensive in a large- NETS-NYPS 16-machine, 68-bus system taken from [40] is nd scale setting because it requires the solution of two large-scale considered as the external area described by the 32 order Lyapunov equations. In [34], FLBT is generalized using a linear model in equation (2). The study area is the IEEE 145- low-rank approximation of Lyapunov equations to extend its bus, 50-machine system also taken from [40]. Bus-53 of the applicability to large-scale systems. FLPORK and O-FLPORK external area is connected to the bus-60 of the study area via do not involve large-scale Lyapunov equations like FLBT [25]. one tie line. The inputs are the voltage magnitude and angle on However, as argued in [34], F (A) may become computa- bus-60 of the study area, and the output is the rotor angle of tionally expensive in a large-scale setting. In [34], various generator-1 which is connected to bus-53 of the external area. computationally efficient approaches to compute F (A) are The study area retains its nonlinear description. The rightmost discussed which also includes quadrature rules for numerical most poles of the external area are plotted in Fig. 2, and it integration. The computational cost in these methods directly can be seen that it has several poorly damped modes in its depends on the number of quadrature nodes. A trade-off model. A 10th order ROM of the external area is generated can be done between the accuracy and computational cost depending on the size of A in a particular problem, and an appropriate number of quadrature nodes can be selected to compute the integral F (A) within the admissible time. Once F (A) is computed, the main computational effort in FLPORK and O-FLPORK is spent on the solution of “sparse-dense” Sylvester equations (27) and (34) respectively because the Lyapunov equations (30) and (37) are small-scale equations. Equations (27) and (34) have large but sparse matrices A, B , and C owing to the sparse structure of power system ! ! state-space model [12], and dense but small matrices S, C and B . As shown in [24], the solution of “sparse-dense” Sylvester equations can be obtained within admissible time as long as r << n which is the situation in MOR and therefore, ~ ~ the Krylov subspaces V and W can be computed easily by either using direct or iterative methods. Thus, FLPORK and O-FLPORK are easily applicable to large-scale power systems. Fig. 2: The rightmost modes of NETS-NYPS IV. A PPLICATIONS by SARQI -based modal truncation, PORK, FLIRKA, FLBT, In this section, we demonstrate the applications of FLPORK FFMIRKA, and FLPORK. SARQI, PORK, FFMIRKA, and on three interconnected power system models. The first model FLPORK preserve the most poorly damped two interarea and is an interconnection of the IEEE 145-bus 50-machine system two local modes of the original system, i.e.,0:2748j4:4888 with the New England Test System-New York Power System and 0:25j8:9339, respectively to capture the interarea and (NETS-NYPS) 68-bus 16-machine system. The second model local oscillations in the ROM. SARQI additionally preserves is the interconnection of the Northeastern Power Coordinating the following modes: 0:25  j14:3865, 0:25  j13:4964, th Council (NPCC) 140-bus 48-machine system with the IEEE and0:2514j11:6271 to make the ROM a 10 order model. 145-bus 50-machine system. The third model is the IEEE 145- The mirror images of the poorly damped modes may be a bus 50-machine system. We first compare the performance of poor choice of interpolation points for H -MOR problem. 2;! FLPORK with SARQI [31] -based modal truncation, PORK Also, the accuracy in the tangential interpolation algorithms [24], FLIRKA [26], FLBT [25], and finite-frequency modal depends strongly on the choice of interpolation points and THIS PAPER IS ACCEPTED FOR PUBLICATION IN INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ELECTRICAL POWER & ENERGY SYSTEMS: DOI: 10.1016/J.IJEPES.2019.105798. COPYRIGHT RESERVED BY ELSEVIER. 8 tangential directions. The final interpolation points and tan- gential directions of FLIRKA at convergence are not known a priori. FLIRKA may end up converging on the interpolation points and tangential directions which are worst for achieving less H -error and vice versa. The fairness of comparison 2;! demands that most (if not all) of the interpolation points and tangential directions of FLPORK and FLIRKA are the same. Therefore, we have used six interpolation points and the tangential directions generated by FLIRKA and iterative rational Krylov algorithm (IRKA) [18] (infinite frequency version of FLIRKA) at convergence in FLPORK and PORK, respectively, for a fair comparison. The desired frequency interval in FLBT, FLIRKA, FFMIRKA, and FLPORK is specified as [0; 8:93] rad/sec corresponding to the frequency of the mode 0:25j8:9339. The frequency-domain error of the ROMs is shown in Fig. 3. It can be seen that FLPORK ensures Fig. 4: Rotor angle of generator-1 of NETS-NYPS test system TABLE II: Comparison of the computational time Method Time (sec) SARQI 6.17 PORK 1.52 FLBT 2.78 FLIRKA 4.93 FFMIRKA 10.96 FLPORK 1.96 TABLE III: Comparison of the simulation time Method Time (sec) Full Order 12.95 SARQI 5.01 PORK 5.10 FLBT 5.03 FLIRKA 5.22 FFMIRKA 6.36 FLPORK 5.15 Fig. 3: Frequency domain error within [0; 2] Hz a good accuracy within the desired frequency region where the 140-bus 40-machine system via Two Tie Lines: In this ex- most poorly damped modes lie. FLBT and FLIRKA are more periment, IEEE 145-bus 50-machine test system is considered accurate than FLPORK in the frequency-domain; however, as the external area, which is connected to the NPCC 140-bus they do not preserve the poorly damped modes of the original 40-machine test system via two tie lines. The NPCC 140-bus system. A 3-phase fault is applied at bus 29 of the study area 40-machine test system is the study area. The bus, line, and at 0:1 sec which is cleared at 0:2 sec, and dynamic simulation machine data of the external and study areas can be found is performed using the Power System Toolbox (PST) [40]. The in [40]. Bus-93 and bus-104 of the IEEE 145-bus 50-machine time domain responses of the original system and the ROMs system are connected to the bus-36 and bus-21, respectively of are shown in Fig. 4. It can be seen that FLPORK also gives the NPCC test system. The linear model for the external area th good accuracy in the time domain. The time consumed by is obtained according to equation (2), which is a 100 order each algorithm to generate the ROM is shown in Table II. model with 4 inputs and 2 outputs. The inputs are the voltage It can be noted that FLPORK is slightly more computational magnitudes and angles on bus-36 and -21 of the NPCC test than PORK due to the computation of the integral F (A) and system, and the outputs are the rotor angles of generator-1 and F (S), but it is efficient as compared to FLBT and FLIRKA. -2 which are connected to bus-93 and -104 of the external area, Although SARQI and FFMIRKA took the most time here respectively. The study area retains its nonlinear description. due to their iterative nature, FLBT is expected to become the The rightmost poles of the external area are plotted in Fig. 5, most expensive as n becomes greater than 2000 due to the and it can be seen that it has several poorly damped modes in th computation of dense large-scale Lyapunov equations. Next, its model. A 12 order ROM of the external area is generated we compare the simulation times of the experiments in Table by SARQI -based modal truncation, PORK, FLIRKA, FLBT, III. It can be noted in Table III and Fig. 4 that the simulation FFMIRKA, and FLPORK. SARQI, PORK, FFMIRKA, and time can significantly be reduced without a significant loss of FLPORK preserve the most poorly damped four interarea and accuracy. two local modes of the original system, i.e., 0:2571j3:936 Test 2: IEEE 145-bus 50-machine system connected to NPCC and 0:2684 j4:765, and 0:1911 11:37, respectively to THIS PAPER IS ACCEPTED FOR PUBLICATION IN INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ELECTRICAL POWER & ENERGY SYSTEMS: DOI: 10.1016/J.IJEPES.2019.105798. COPYRIGHT RESERVED BY ELSEVIER. 9 Fig. 5: The rightmost modes of IEEE 50-machine test system Fig. 7: Rotor angle of generator-1 of IEEE 145-bus 50- machine test system capture the interarea and local oscillations in the ROM. SARQI additionally preserves the following modes: 0:2897j5:097, th 0:4143j5:184, and 0:548j7:7 to make the ROM a 12 order model. Again, we have used six interpolation points and the tangential directions generated by FLIRKA and IRKA [18] in FLPORK and PORK, respectively, for a fair comparison. The desired frequency interval in FLBT, FLIRKA, FFMIRKA, and FLPORK is specified as [0; 11:37] rad/sec corresponding to the frequency of the mode 0:191111:37. The frequency- domain error of the ROMs is shown in Fig. 6. It can be seen Fig. 8: Rotor angle of generator-2 of IEEE 145-bus 50- machine test system significantly be reduced without a significant loss of accuracy. TABLE IV: Comparison of the computational time Method Time (sec) SARQI 9.08 PORK 1.95 FLBT 3.59 Fig. 6: Frequency domain error within [0; 2] Hz FLIRKA 8.19 FFMIRKA 12.01 FLPORK 2.14 that FLPORK ensures a good accuracy within the desired frequency region where the most poorly damped modes lie. A 3-phase fault is applied at bus-36 of the study area at 0:1 TABLE V: Comparison of the simulation time sec which is cleared at 0:5 sec, and dynamic simulation is Method Time (sec) performed using PST [40]. The time domain responses of the Full Order 17.05 original system and the ROMs are shown in Fig. 7 and Fig. 8. SARQI 6.29 PORK 6.31 It can be seen that FLPORK also gives good accuracy in the FLBT 6.10 time domain as well. The time consumed by each algorithm FLIRKA 6.09 to generate the ROM is shown in Table IV. Next, we compare FFMIRKA 7.17 FLPORK 6.33 the simulation times of the experiments in Table V. It can be noted in Table V and Fig. 7-8 that the simulation times can THIS PAPER IS ACCEPTED FOR PUBLICATION IN INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ELECTRICAL POWER & ENERGY SYSTEMS: DOI: 10.1016/J.IJEPES.2019.105798. COPYRIGHT RESERVED BY ELSEVIER. 10 B. Reduced Order Damping Controller Design Test 3: Damping Controller for IEEE 145-bus 50-machine system: In this experiment, the reduced-order damping con- troller design problem for the IEEE 50-machine 145-bus system taken from [40] is considered. The linearized model th of this test system is a 350 order system obtained ac- cording to equations (3)-(10). The four most poorly damped interarea modes are the following: 0:2071  j3:8803 and 0:1945  j3:6916. The important modes of the system are shown in Fig. 9. The H controller design yields a controller Fig. 10: Frequency domain error within [0; 1] Hz FLPORK provides maximum damping. The interarea modes Fig. 9: The rightmost modes of 50-machine test system of the same order as that of the plant which is impractical for the implementation. Therefore, we reduce the original model th and then design the controller using the ROM. A 6 order ROM is constructed using SARQI-based modal truncation, PORK, FLBT, FLIRKA, FFMIRKA, and FLPORK. SARQI, PORK, and FLPORK preserve the following modes of the original system: 0:2071 j3:8803, 0:1945 j3:6916, and 0:0167  j0:5988 while FFMIRKA preserves 0:2071 Fig. 11: Angular velocity deviation in G-21 j3:8803 and 0:1945  j3:6916. The desired frequency in- terval is specified as [0; 3:88] rad/sec corresponding to the frequency of the mode 0:2071  j3:8803. Fig. 10 shows the frequency-domain error of the ROMs (corresponding to output-1). It can be noted that FLPORK ensures a good accuracy within the frequency region, which contains the electromechanical modes of the system. The locations for the damping controller is identified using the participation factor method [43], and it suggests generator-21 (G-21) and generator-24 (G-24) be the appropriate locations. The angular velocity deviations from the reference angular velocity of these two generators are used as the feedback signals and the th control input is added at V . A 6 order decentralized ref H damping controller is designed for each ROM using the approach in [29] which adds damping to the poorly damped interarea modes 0:2071j3:8803 and 0:1945j3:6916. A 10% step change is induced in the mechanical torque of G-21 which in turn induces low-frequency oscillations. The angular Fig. 12: Angular velocity deviation in G-24 velocity deviations in G-21 and G-24 with the open-loop and closed-loop systems are shown in Fig. 11 and Fig. 12. It can be seen that the controller designed using the ROM generated by in the closed-loop systems are tabulated in Table VI. THIS PAPER IS ACCEPTED FOR PUBLICATION IN INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ELECTRICAL POWER & ENERGY SYSTEMS: DOI: 10.1016/J.IJEPES.2019.105798. COPYRIGHT RESERVED BY ELSEVIER. 11 TABLE VI: Interarea modes in the closed-loop systems [9] G. Scarciotti, “Low computational complexity model reduction of power systems with preservation of physical characteristics,” IEEE Transac- No Method Mode % f (Hz) tions on Power Systems, vol. 32, no. 1, pp. 743–752, 2017. Open-loop 0:2071 j3:8803 5:32 0:6176 [10] S. Ghosh and N. Senroy, “Balanced truncation approach to power sys- SARQI 0:3113 j3:9336 7:89 0:6261 tem model order reduction,” Electric Power Components and Systems, PORK 0:3060 j3:8628 9:01 0:6148 vol. 41, no. 8, pp. 747–764, 2013. 1 FLBT 0:3071 j3:9404 7:77 0:6271 [11] Z. Zhu, G. Geng, and Q. Jiang, “Power system dynamic model reduction FLIRKA 0:3123 j3:8380 8:11 0:6108 based on extended krylov subspace method,” IEEE Transactions on FFMIRKA 0:3539 j3:9291 8:97 0:6253 Power Systems, vol. 31, no. 6, pp. 4483–4494, 2016. FLPORK 0:4369 j3:8662 11:23 0:6153 [12] F. D. Freitas, J. Rommes, and N. Martins, “Gramian-based reduction Open-loop 0:1945 j3:6916 5:26 0:5875 method applied to large sparse power system descriptor models,” IEEE SARQI 0:2582 j3:5178 7:32 0:5599 Transactions on Power Systems, vol. 23, no. 3, pp. 1258–1270, 2008. PORK 0:2886 j3:4656 8:30 0:5516 [13] P. Kundur, N. J. Balu, and M. G. Lauby, Power system stability and 2 FLBT 0:2319 j3:7398 6:19 0:5952 control. McGraw-hill New York, 1994, vol. 7. FLIRKA 0:3483 j3:6382 9:53 0:5790 [14] J. J. Sanchez-Gasca and J. H. Chow, “Power system reduction to FFMIRKA 0:3596 j3:6744 9:74 0:5848 simplify the design of damping controllers for interarea oscillations,” FLPORK 0:3803 j3:4302 11:07 0:5459 IEEE Transactions on Power systems, vol. 11, no. 3, pp. 1342–1349, [15] A. Yogarathinam, J. Kaur, and N. R. Chaudhuri, “A new h-irka approach for model reduction with explicit modal preservation: Application on V. CONCLUSION grids with renewable penetration,” IEEE Transactions on Control Sys- In this paper, a frequency-limited MOR technique is pro- tems Technology, no. 99, pp. 1–9, 2017. [16] B. Moore, “Principal component analysis in linear systems: Controllabil- posed which yields a ROM which not only satisfies a subset of ity, observability, and model reduction,” IEEE transactions on automatic the first-order optimality conditions of the problem jjG(j!) control, vol. 26, no. 1, pp. 17–32, 1981. G(j!)jj but also preserves the electromechanical modes [17] D. Wilson, “Optimum solution of model-reduction problem,” in Pro- 2;! ceedings of the Institution of Electrical Engineers, vol. 117, no. 6. IET, of the power system. The proposed algorithm can generate 1970, pp. 1161–1165. an accurate ROM with the desired modes, which ensures a [18] S. Gugercin, A. C. Antoulas, and C. Beattie, “H2 model reduction for good accuracy in the desired frequency interval. The proposed large-scale linear dynamical systems,” SIAM journal on matrix analysis and applications, vol. 30, no. 2, pp. 609–638, 2008. algorithm is applicable to large-scale systems and hence can be [19] J. Kennedy, “Particle swarm optimization,” Encyclopedia of machine used for fast dynamic simulation and reduced order controller learning, pp. 760–766, 2010. design for large-scale power systems. [20] U. Zulfiqar, V. Sreeram, and X. Du, “Finite-frequency power system reduction,” International Journal of Electrical Power & Energy Systems, vol. 113, pp. 35–44, 2019. ACKNOWLEDGMENT [21] D. Petersson and J. Lofber ¨ g, “Model reduction using a frequency-limited h2-cost,” Systems & Control Letters, vol. 67, pp. 32–39, 2014. The first author would like to thank M. A. Pai of the [22] P. Vuillemin, “Frequency-limited model approximation of large-scale University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, USA dynamical models,” Ph.D. dissertation, ISAE-Institut Superieur ´ de for explaining his work [5], [35], and answering several l’Aeronautique ´ et de l’Espace, 2014. [23] M. I. Ahmad, “Krylov subspace techniques for model reduction and the questions related to power system modeling for MOR done solution of linear matrix equations,”, Ph.D. dissertation, Imperial College in his students’ work [38], [39]. This work was supported by London, 2011. National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant [24] T. Wolf, “H pseudo-optimal model order reduction,” Ph.D. dissertation, Technische Universitat ¨ Munchen, ¨ 2014. (No. 61873336, 61873335), and supported in part by 111 [25] W. Gawronski and J.-N. Juang, “Model reduction in limited time and Project (No. D18003). frequency intervals,” International Journal of Systems Science, vol. 21, no. 2, pp. 349–376, 1990. [26] P. Vuillemin, C. Poussot-Vassal, and D. Alazard, “H2 optimal and REFERENCES frequency limited approximation methods for large-scale lti dynamical systems,” IFAC Proceedings Volumes, vol. 46, no. 2, pp. 719–724, 2013. [1] C. Sturk, L. Vanfretti, Y. Chompoobutrgool, and H. Sandberg, [27] G. Rogers, Power system oscillations. Springer Science & Business “Coherency-independent structured model reduction of power systems,” Media, 2012. IEEE Transactions on Power Systems, vol. 29, no. 5, pp. 2418–2426, [28] B. Pal and B. Chaudhuri, Robust control in power systems. Springer Science & Business Media, 2006. [2] J. H. Chow, Power system coherency and model reduction, ser. Power [29] S. Furuya, J. Irisawa et al., “A robust H power system stabilizer Electronics and Power Systems. New York, NY, USA: Springer, 2013. 1 design using reduced-order models,” International Journal of Electrical [3] C. Huang, K. Zhang, X. Dai, and W. Wang, “Model reduction of power Power & Energy Systems, vol. 28, no. 1, pp. 21–28, 2006. systems based on the balanced residualization method,” in 2012 IEEE [30] H. K. Panzer, “Model order reduction by krylov subspace methods Power and Energy Society General Meeting. IEEE, 2012, pp. 1–7. with global error bounds and automatic choice of parameters,” Ph.D. [4] G. Scarciotti, “Model reduction of power systems with preservation of dissertation, Technische Universitat ¨ Munchen, ¨ 2014. slow and poorly damped modes,” in 2015 IEEE Power & Energy Society [31] J. Rommes, N. Martins, and F. D. Freitas, “Computing rightmost General Meeting. IEEE, 2015, pp. 1–5. eigenvalues for small-signal stability assessment of large-scale power [5] D. Chaniotis and M. Pai, “Model reduction in power systems us- systems,” IEEE transactions on power systems, vol. 25, no. 2, pp. 929– ing krylov subspace methods,” IEEE Transactions on Power Systems, 938, 2010. vol. 20, no. 2, pp. 888–894, 2005. [32] F. TP462, “Identification of electromechanical modes in power systems,” [6] R. Nath, S. S. Lamba, and K. P. Rao, “Coherency based system decomposition into study and external areas using weak coupling,” IEEE IEEE Task Force Report, 2012. Transactions on Power Apparatus and Systems, no. 6, pp. 1443–1449, [33] J. Rommes and N. Martins, “Efficient computation of multivariable 1985. transfer function dominant poles using subspace acceleration,” IEEE [7] R. Podmore, “Identification of coherent generators for dynamic equiva- transactions on power systems, vol. 21, no. 4, pp. 1471–1483, 2006. lents,” IEEE Transactions on Power Apparatus and Systems, no. 4, pp. [34] P. Benner, P. Kurschner ¨ , and J. Saak, “Frequency-limited balanced 1344–1354, 1978. truncation with low-rank approximations,” SIAM Journal on Scientific [8] R. De Mello, R. Podmore, and K. Stanton, “Coherency-based dynamic Computing, vol. 38, no. 1, pp. A471–A499, 2016. equivalents: Applications in transient stability studies,” in Proc. PICA [35] S. Liu, P. W. Sauer, D. Chaniotis, and M. Pai, “Krylov subspace and Conf, 1975, pp. 23–31. balanced truncation methods for power system model reduction,” in THIS PAPER IS ACCEPTED FOR PUBLICATION IN INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ELECTRICAL POWER & ENERGY SYSTEMS: DOI: 10.1016/J.IJEPES.2019.105798. COPYRIGHT RESERVED BY ELSEVIER. 12 Power System Coherency and Model Reduction. Springer, 2013, pp. 119–142. [36] P. W. Sauer and M. A. Pai, Power system dynamics and stability. Prentice hall Upper Saddle River, NJ, 1998, vol. 101. [37] P. M. Anderson and A. A. Fouad, Power system control and stability. John Wiley & Sons, 2008. [38] S. Liu, “Dynamic-data driven real-time identification for electric power systems,” Ph.D. dissertation, University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign, 2009. [39] D. Chaniotis, “Krylov subspace methods in power system studies,” Ph.D. dissertation, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2001. [40] J. H. Chow and K. W. Cheung, “A toolbox for power system dynamics and control engineering education and research,” IEEE transactions on Power Systems, vol. 7, no. 4, pp. 1559–1564, 1992. [41] S. E. G. Sanchez, Applications of Krylov Subspace and Balanced Truncation Model Order Reduction in Power Systems. University of Arkansas, 2017. [42] D. Lee, “Ieee recommended practice for excitation system models for power system stability studies (ieee std 421.5-1992),” Energy Devel- opment and Power Generating Committee of the Power Engineering Society, vol. 95, no. 96, 1992. [43] Y.-Y. Hsu and C.-L. Chen, “Identification of optimum location for stabiliser applications using participation factors,” in IEE Proceedings C (Generation, Transmission and Distribution), vol. 134, no. 3. IET, 1987, pp. 238–244.

Journal

Electrical Engineering and Systems SciencearXiv (Cornell University)

Published: Oct 6, 2019

References