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Fluid-structure coupling of concentric double FGM shells with different lengths

Fluid-structure coupling of concentric double FGM shells with different lengths Structural Engineering and Mechanics, Vol. 61, No. 2 (2017) 231-244 DOI: https://doi.org/10.12989/sem.2017.61.2.231 231 Fluid-structure coupling of concentric double FGM shells with different lengths 1 2 3 4 Ehsan Moshkelgosha , Ehsan Askari , Kyeong-Hoon Jeong and Ali Akbar Shafiee Research Department, Samin Sanaat Shaigan Company, Isfahan, Iran CMEMS - Center for Microelectromechanical Systems, University of Minho, Azurém, 4800-058 Guimarães, Portugal Mechanical Engineering Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 989-111 Daedeok-daero, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-353, Republic of Korea Mechanical Engineering Department, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan, Iran (Received May 1, 2016, Revised September 8, 2016, Accepted September 25, 2016) Abstract. The aim of this study is to develop a semi-analytical method to investigate fluid-structure coupling of concentric double shells with different lengths and elastic behaviours. Co-axial shells constitute a cylindrical circular container and a baffle submerged inside the stored fluid. The container shell is made of functionally graded materials with mechanical properties changing through its thickness continuously. The baffle made of steel is fixed along its top edge and submerged inside fluid such that its lower edge freely moves. The developed approach is verified using a commercial finite element computer code. Although the model is presented for a specific case in the present work, it can be generalized to investigate coupling of shell- plate structures via fluid. It is shown that the coupling between concentric shells occurs only when they vibrate in a same circumferential mode number, n. It is also revealed that the normalized vibration amplitude of the inner shell is about the same as that of the outer shell, for narrower radial gaps. Moreover, the natural frequencies of the fluid-coupled system gradually decrease and converge to the certain values as the gradient index increases. Keywords: coupled vibration; concentric shells; fluid-structure interaction; functionally graded materials filled functionally graded cylindrical orthotropic shells with 1. Introduction arbitrary thickness. Hasheminejad and Rajabi (2007) developed an exact methodology under the umbrella of the Functionally graded materials (FGMs) are advanced inherent background coefficients to consider the scattering composites, microscopically engineered to have a smooth of time-harmonic plane acoustic waves by a thick hollow spatial variation of material properties in order to improve isotropic FG cylinder immersed in and filled with non- overall performance. Typically, FGMs are composed from a viscous compressible fluids. Sheng and Wang (2008) mixture of metals and ceramics and are further reported the results of an investigation on the vibration of characterized by a smooth and continuous change of the functionally graded cylindrical shells with a flowing fluid, mechanical properties from one surface to another. FGMs embedded in an elastic medium, under mechanical and are regarded as one of the most promising candidates for thermal loads. The vibration and stability of freely future intelligent composites in many engineering fields supported FGM truncated and complete conical shells such as heat exchanger tubes, biomedical implants, subjected to uniform lateral and hydrostatic pressures were flywheels, blades, storage tanks, pressure vessels, and investigated by Sofiyev (2009). Iqbal et al. (2009) general wear and corrosion resistant coatings or for joining investigated the vibration characteristics of a functionally dissimilar materials in aerospace and automobile industries. graded material circular cylindrical shell filled with fluid As the dynamic parameters play an important role in the using a wave propagation approach. Sofiyev (2010) design of modern advanced structures, many valuable presented an analytical study on the dynamic behavior of studies on dynamic characteristics of inhomogeneous the infinitely-long, FGM cylindrical shell subjected to structures and in particular FGM cylindrical shells could be combined action of the axial tension, internal compressive found in the literature. Moreover, dynamic behaviour of load and ring-shaped compressive pressure. The structures coupled with fluid is of great importance in characteristics of beam-mode stability of fluid-conveying various scientific and engineering applications, such as shell systems were investigated by Shen et al. (2014) for fluid-storage tanks, fuel tanks of space vehicles, nuclear shells with boundary conditions, using a FEM algorithm. reactors, and tower-like structures. Chen et al. (2004) Wali et al. (2015) studied free vibration response of FGM considered the free vibration of simply supported, fluid- shells by using an efficient three-dimensional shell model. Sofiyev and Kuruoglu (2015) studied the dynamic instability of three-layered cylindrical shells containing a Corresponding author, Ph.D. functionally graded (FG) interlayer subjected to static and E-mail: ehsanaskary@gmail.com time dependent periodic axial compressive loads. Copyright © 2017 Techno-Press, Ltd. http://www.techno-press.org/?journal=sem&subpage=8 ISSN: 1225-4568 (Print), 1598-6217 (Online) 232 Ehsan Moshkelgosha, Ehsan Askari, Kyeong-Hoon Jeong and Ali Akbar Shafiee In addition, obstacles like baffles are usually used as fluid. damping devices to suppress the fluid sloshing motion in Thus, this study considers the dynamic analysis of a fluid-structure systems. Sloshing is a potential source of partially fluid-filled cylindrical container with a flexible disturbance in fluid storage containers. The fluid in baffle, acquiring coupled modes and eigen-frequencies. The containers displays a free-surface fluctuation when the container is made of functionally graded materials with container is subjected to an external excitation, like an mechanical properties changing through its thickness earthquake. This fluid sloshing may be a direct or indirect continuously. A semi-analytical method is developed taking cause of the unexpected instability and failure in some fluid-structure interaction into account. The fluid region is engineering applications (Wang et al. 2016, Zhou et al. divided into two regions, namely the inner region and the 2014, Askari et al. 2013, Askari et al. 2010). Some outer region on the basis of the radius of the inner shell. The examples are the vibration analysis of fluid-storage tanks velocity potential of both fluid regions is described in terms under earthquake waves, nuclear fuel storage pool, of the Bessel functions and the sinusoidal functions biomechanical systems, fuel storage tanks of aerospace appropriate to the boundary condition between the two vehicles and cargo tanks of LNG. To suppress sloshing, distinct fluid regions. Using the collocation method, the some internal bodies or baffles are generally placed in fluid Galerkin method and the superposition principle, storage tanks. It is well known that using such baffles relationships between the unknown coefficients of the results in energy dissipation and reduction in sloshing velocity potential and the modal function of the shells are amplitude and hydrodynamic loads. In designing baffled obtained as matrix forms. Finally, the Rayleigh-Ritz method containers, considering the sloshing phenomenon and the is used to derive the frequency equation of the system. The structural vibration are essential. It can be noted that baffled developed methodology is applied to specific cases of fluid- containers have two groups of modes: sloshing and bulging coupled systems and verified comparing with a finite ones. Sloshing modes are caused by the oscillation of fluid element analysis. free surface, whereas bulging modes are related to vibrations of the structure. In fact, it is well known that the effect of the free surface waves is low on bulging modes for 2. Mathematical formulation structures that are not extremely flexible (Morand and Ohayon 1995, Askari and Daneshmand 2010, Askari and Consider a baffle of length h, radius b, and uniform Daneshmand 2009). In the present paper, attention is thickness t submerged inside a cylindrical container of focused on the bulging modes of baffled containers. length L, radius a, and uniform thickness t , as it is depicted Cho et al. (2002) presented the fluid-structure in Fig. 1. The baffle is fixed at its top and its lower edge interaction problems of fluid-storage containers with baffle freely moves in fluid domain. Meanwhile, the bottom of the by the structural-acoustic finite element formulation. Biswal container is rigid and flat, whereas its lateral wall is et al. (2004) developed a finite element code and flexible. The container is assumed to be clamped-free and investigated the influence of a baffle on the dynamic contains a fluid with a depth H, having a free surface. response of a partially fluid-filled cylindrical tank. Moreover, the radial, circumferential and axial coordinates Gavrilyuk et al. (2006) presented fundamental solutions of are illustrated by r, θ and x, respectively. The container is the linearized problem on fluid sloshing in a vertical made of functionally graded materials and its mechanical cylindrical baffled container. A pressure-based finite properties change continuously according to gradually element technique has been developed to analyse the slosh varying the volume fraction of the constituent materials, dynamics of a partially filled rigid container with bottom- usually in the thickness direction (Hosseini-Hashemi et al. mounted submerged components by Mitra and 2010). The fluid-storage tank is made of a composition of Sinhamahapatra (2007). Biswal and Bhattacharyya (2010) ceramic and metal with varying substance from its outer employed finite element method to investigate the influence surface to inner surface, respectively. The modulus of of composite baffles on the coupled dynamics of containers. elasticity and density vary linearly through the shell Askari et al. (2011) proposed a semi-analytical method to thickness according to a power-law distribution as study the effect of rigid internal bodies on partially fluid- (1) E(z) (E  E )V (z) E , c a b a filled containers. Wang et al. (2012, 2013) studied the effect of multiple rigid baffles on free and force vibration of a  ( z) (  )V ( z) , (2) c a b a rigid cylindrical fluid-storage tank. Ebrahimian et al. (2014) developed a numerical model based on the boundary in which the subscripts a and c represent metallic and element method to determine an equivalent mechanical ceramic constituents, respectively, and the volume fraction model for fluid storage containers with multiple baffles. V may be given by (Hosseini-Hashemi et al. 2010, Shafiee Although many remarkable studies have previously et al. 2014) been conducted on dynamic analyses of shells made of z 1 functionally-graded materials, fluid-coupled vibration of   (3) V ( z)    FGM containers with baffles has not been investigated yet, t 2   based on the best knowledge of the authors. Moreover, where α is the gradient index and takes only a positive investigating the influence of baffle flexibility on vibration value. z is measured from the middle surface of the shell of partially fluid-filled container, and vice versa, is of towards outside, −t/2≤z≤t/2. However, the Poisson’s ratio is paramount importance in primary design stages of baffled taken 0.3 over simulation. Typical values for metal and containers due to the coupled vibration of structures through Fluid-structure coupling of concentric double FGM shells with different lengths 233 Fig. 1 a schematic representation of a partially fluid-filled cylindrical baffled container paired with a 2D slice of the container wall divided into 8 layers and made from a combination of ceramic and metal varying along the thickness direction Table 1 Material properties used in the FG shells where the middle surface of the shell is delineated as Ω in Properties Metal Ceramic Eq. (5), and the membrane stiffness is defined as Aluminum (Al) Zirconia (ZrO ) Aluminia (Al O ) 2 2 3 t / 2 E( z) E (GPa) 70 200 380 K  dz, (6) 3  2  t / 2 ρ (kg/m ) 2702 5700 3800 1 ( z)   t / 2 E( z) ( z) K  dz,  (7)  x  2 ceramics used in the present article are listed in Table 1.  t / 2 1 ( z)  Moreover, the fluid is water with a mass density ρ , which t / 2 is assumed to be inviscid and incompressible.  K  G( z)dz, (8)  t / 2 2.1 Rayleigh-Ritz method the bending stiffness In order to obtain the characteristic equations of a t / 2 E( z) z D dz, (9) dynamic system, the Rayleigh-Ritz method can be used by  2  t / 2 1 ( z) introducing the Rayleigh quotient (Zhu, 1995), for the    dynamic system presented in this study, which is written as  t / 2 E( z) ( z) z D   dz, (10)  x U  U 2 S S 2  t / 2 1 2  1 ( z)    (4)     T  T  T S S L  1 2 t / 2 D  G( z) z dz, (11) where U and U are the potential energies associated  S S  t / 2 1 2 with the container and baffle, respectively. and T T 1 2 and the membrane-bending coupled stiffness also are the reference kinetic energies of the shells, while t / 2 E( z) z T is the simplified fluid reference kinetic energy due to C  dz, (12)  2  t / 2 shell movements. Finally, ω is the natural frequency of the 1 ( z)  fluid-coupled system.   Knowing that the material properties of a cylindrical  t / 2  E( z) ( z) z  C  dz, (13) shell made of functionally graded materials change x   2  t / 2  1 ( z) continuously through its thickness, the general potential  energy of the shell, according to the assumption of shell  t / 2 theory, is as follows (Leissa 1969, Soedel 2003) C  G( z) zdz, (14)  t / 2 K K 2 2 G 2 U  [ (  ) K (  )  ) Rd Furthermore, the strain-displacement relations of the x  x x  x  2 2 FGM cylindrical shell in the cylindrical coordinates are the D D 2 2 G 2 same as homogeneous ones, the strains and curvatures of  [ (  ) D     )Rd] x  x x  x  (5) 2 2 the shell at the its middle surface are as follows  C (    ) C (    ) x x   x x   x  u    (15)   ,       x    C   )Rd , d dx d x    G x x 234 Ehsan Moshkelgosha, Ehsan Askari, Kyeong-Hoon Jeong and Ali Akbar Shafiee  1  w     (16)     (  w),      v ( x, ) V Λ ( x) sin( s ) 2 (27) 2  ks k  a    s1 k1   1 u v   (17)         ,  x w (x, ) W Λ (x) cos(s )  a  x  2  ks k (28) s1 k1  w     where , and are parameters of the Rayleigh- (18) U V W   ,       ks x   ks ks     x  Ritz expansio n. T he symbols, s and k ind icate the circumferential wave number and the axial mode number,  1  w v   respectively. The dry beam function Λ (x) is used as the (19)     (  ),      2 2 a d mi s s i b l e f u n c t i o n , s a t is f yi n g i mp o s e d b o u n d a r y      a  conditions and ϕ can be calculated from the characteristic equations (Blevins 1979). After extracting the potential    1  w v (20)      ),   (2  ),  x energies and kinetic energies of cylindrical structures, the  a x x   only remaining term to be computed in Eq. (4) is the where u, v, and w are the axial, circumferential and radial  simplified fluid kinetic energy due to shell movements, , displacements of the shell on its middle surface, which can be written by using the Green’s theorem respectively. The reference kinetic energy of the FGM shell, (Amabili et al. 1998) as discussed by Soedel (2003), is given by 1   2 T     d S 1 L L  (29)    2  T   q qd   S (21) I II I 1 II ~ 2 2 2 w h e r e S  S  S  S t h a t S a n d a r e t h e  (u ( x, ) v ( x, ) w ( x, )d 2 2 2 1 2  lateral wet surface of the baffle in the regions (I) and (II), ~ respectively. The symbol, S , is the lateral wet surface of the where  is the surface mass density written as follows cylindrical container. ς also is the normal direction to the t / 2 surface S of the fluid domain. Furthermore, the variable, φ    (z)dz, (22)  in Eq. (29) is the fluid displacement potential. t / 2 To apply the Rayleigh-Ritz method, the modal 2.2 Velocity and displacement potentials functions, (Blevins 1979), of the container shell with any boundary conditions are written as a linear combination of The inviscid, incompressible and irrotational fluid admissible functions permits the introduction of a velocity potential for the fluid   motion (Eftekhari 2016). The liquid velocity potential can 1  ( x) u ( x, ) U cos(n ), 1  mn be expressed as  x n1 m1 (23) ~ i t 2 m  (r, , x,t) i (r, , x) e , i 1. (30)   where the fluid displacement potential φ satisfies the   superposition principle stated in Eq. (31), (Amabili et al. v ( x, ) V  ( x) sin( n ) (24) 1 mn m  1998). n1 m1    (31) 1 2   w (x, ) W  (x) cos(n ) (25) 1 mn m The fluid displacement potential associated with the  n1 m1 motion of the cylindrical container is denoted by φ , while the baffle is assumed to be rigid. Conversely, φ is the fluid where U , V and W are the parameters of the Rayleigh- 2 mn mn mn displacement potential in conjunction with the motion of the Ritz expansion; the symbols n and m are the circumferential baffle when the container is considered stationary. In order wave number and the axial mode number, respectively. The to formulate fluid motion, the fluid domain can be assumed dry beam function, ψ (x), is used as the admissible function to consist of two separated parts, regions (I) and (II) as satisfying imposed boundary conditions and β can be follows calculated from the characteristic equations based on boundary conditions, as discussed by Blevins (1979). The    Region I  r, , x : r  b, x H modal functions for the cylindrical baffle are also given by (32) Region II r, , x : b r  a, x H.   ~ 1 Λ ( x)  k k u ( x, ) U cos(s ),  (26) That is to say, the region (I) is the cylindrical inner 2  ks k  x L s1 k1 liquid domain, and the region (II) the annular outer liquid domain. Three interfacing surfaces between the shells and fluid are defined as shown in Eq. (33) and Fig. 1. Fluid-structure coupling of concentric double FGM shells with different lengths 235 relation term by term between 0 and H, the coefficient, C mni  (r, , x) : r  b , 0  2 , x L h can be written as a function of the unknown coefficient,  (r, , x) : r  b , 0  2 , L h x H (33) B , by the well known properties of orthogonal mni trigonometric functions.   (r, , x) : r  a , 0  2 , 0 x H 1 2 where the symbol γ represents the interface between two C   ( x) cos( x) d x mni i m K ( a) H (42) fluid regions along the axial gap between the inner shell and n m the container bottom. In addition, γ′ is the interfacing  B I ( a) mni n m boundary between the fluid and the inner shell along either where  and  indicate the derivatives of I and K , region (I) or region (II), while γ′′ is the fluid-interfacing I K n n n n respectively. Moreover, the compatibility conditions and the boundary of the outer shell in region (II). boundary conditions, Eqs. (35)-(39), must be so satisfied as to be found the unknown coefficients contained in Eqs. 2.2.1 Fluid displacement potential associated with the (43)-(45). container, φ The spatial displacement potential, φ , can be written for II  both fluid regions (Askari et al. 2013).  along    r (43)      rb r I I II II   W  ,   W  , (34) rb 1  mn mn 1  mn mn 0 along m1n1 m1n1 II I I II (44) where and are the displacement potential   along  ,   1 1 mn mn functions in the fluid regions (I) and (II) induced by the II  vibration of the outer shell, respectively. The modal   0 along  . (45) r parameter W is used for the Rayleigh-Ritz expansion mn rb defined in Eq. (25). The displacement potential should Solving the above equations, simultaneously by satisfy not only the Laplace equation of Eq. (35), but also employing the Galerkin method leads to Eq. (46) boundary conditions and compatibility equation of Eqs. (36)-(39).   Θ A Θ B Θ 1 ni 2 ni 3  (46) P A  P B  P 1 ni 2 ni 3    0 , (35)  ′ ′ in which the unknown coefficients matrices, A and B , ni ni   0 , along L h x H , (36) are given in Appendix A. r rb 2.2.2 Fluid displacement potential associated with the   0 , (37) baffle, φ x x 0 The fluid displacement potential for each fluid region is assumed to be   0, (38) x H     ~ ~ I I II II   W Ω ,   W Ω (47) 2  ks ks 2  ks ks  k1 s1 k1 s1  w along 0 x H , (39) r r a where is the parameters of the Ritz expansion defined ks I II The problem defined by the above relations allows the in Eq. (28). Ω and Ω are displacement potential ks ks separation of spatial variables in the cylindrical coordinate eigen-functions in liquid regions (I) and (II), respectively. system for each liquid region The displacement liquid potential should satisfy the Laplace equation given in Eq. (48) and boundary conditions of Eqs.   cos(n ) A cos( x)I ( r), (49)-(52). in  mni m n m m1 (40) (48)    0 ,  (2m 1)   ,  2H  w , along L h x H (49) r rb and  II  0 (50)   cos(n ) cos( x) in  m x x 0 (41) m1   B I ( r) C K ( r)   0 (51) mni n m mni n m 2 x H ′ ′ ′ where A , B and C are unknown coefficients mni mni mni   0, along 0 x H depending on integers m, n and i. I and K are the modified (52) n n r Bessel functions of the first and second kind of order n, ra respectively. Using Eq. (39) and integrating the resultant In the inner liquid region (I), the separation of the 236 Ehsan Moshkelgosha, Ehsan Askari, Kyeong-Hoon Jeong and Ali Akbar Shafiee variables gives Although there are no contacts between the shells, they are interactive through fluid, which is called as the coupling (12) ( 21) Ω  cos(s ) A cos( x) I ( r ), ks  fsk f s f effect of fluid. In fact, two terms of and in T T L L f 1 (53) Eq. (59) are the reference kinetic energy terms associated  (2 f  1) with the interaction between the shells via fluid.   2H 2 H I II (12) T   (  ) w b d x d (60) and in the outer liquid region (II), it gives L L 1 1 rb 2   0 Lh II 2 H (21) II Ω  cos(s )B cos( x) ks  fsk f   T    w adxd (61) L L 2 1   ra f 1 0 0 (54)  I ( a)  so s f  I ( r) K ( r)   s f s f       1 ~ K ( a) (12)  s f    T   b W W L L  in js n1 s1 i1 j1 m1 where A and B are unknown coefficients. It also is fsk fsk    necessary to ensure that fluid displacement potentials and I ( a) n m   B I ( b) K ( b)   mni n m n m  dynamic displacement normal to wet surfaces are K ( a)  n m  continuous along γ, and Eq. (49) should be satisfied along γ′ 2 K ( b) n m (Askari et al. 2011). These requirements are listed in Eqs.  ( x) cos( x) d x  i m (62) H K ( a) (55)-(57). n m  A I ( b) mni n m II  2 H 2 on  cos( x)Λ ( x)dx cos(n ) cos(s )d m j   r 0  Lh (55) rb r rb 1 ~ w on  W OS W  2 II II and (56)   on 2 2      ( 21) T   a W W B II L L  is jn fsi  2 n1 s1 f 1 i1 j1  w on (57) r  I  rb s  (I ( a) ( a)K ( a))   s f f s f  K   (63) Substituting Eqs. (53) and (54) into Eqs. (55)-(57) and 2 employing the collocation method, the unknown cos(n ) cos(s )d cos( x) ( x)dx s j 0 0 coefficients, A and B can be written as a matrix form of fsk fsk Eq. (58). 1 ~  W OS W Q A  Q B  Q 1 sk 2 sk 3  (58) Moreover, the term representing the interaction between R A  R B  R  1 sk 2 sk 3 the liquid and outer shell in Eq. (44) is 2 H Matrices existing in Eq. (58) are defined in Appendix B. 1 (1) II T     w adxd L L 1 r a 1   0 0      2.3 Reference fluid kinetic energy   a W W L  in js n1 s1 i1 j1 m1 The total kinetic energy of fluid can be obtained  I ( a)  expanding Eq. (29), which is a summation of the kinetic n m  B I ( a) K ( a)    mni n m n m energies of liquid as shown in Eq. (59).  K ( a)  n m  (64) 1 H K ( a)   2 n m T     ( x) cos( x) d x  L L i m  2  H K ( a) n m  2 H I I II II H 2  (  )w  (  )w  b d x d 1 2 2 1 2 2 rb   cos( x) ( x)dx cos(n ) cos(s )d 0 L h m j (59)  0 0 2 H  II  II      w adxd L 1 2 1   r a  W OP W 0 0 ( 2) (12) (1) ( 21) T  T  T  T L L L L and the interaction between the inner shell and fluid is the () 2 (1) ( 2) term , which is where T and T are the kinetic energy terms owing L 2 H ( 2) I II to the interaction between the outer and inner shells with T   (  ) w b d x d L L 2 2 rb 2   0 Lh liquid, respectively. In addition, the kinetic energy terms,      (1 2) ( 21) 1 ~ ~ T and T indicate the interaction between the   b W W L L  L in js n1 s1 i1 j1 f 1 shells via liquid (Amabili et al. 1998).                    Θ                   Fluid-structure coupling of concentric double FGM shells with different lengths 237         The maximum potential energy of both of cylindrical    shells, Eq. (5), becomes  B I ( b) ( a)K ( b)  fsi s f f s f  K  s  U  U  U  Q KQ, (69) S S1 S 2  A I ( b) fsi s f 2 (65) H 2 with the partitioned matrix K, which is  cos( x)Θ ( x)dx cos(n ) cos(s )d f j   Lh 0 K  0   S1 1 ~ ~ K  , (70)  W OP W   0 K   S 2  where K and K are the stiffness matrixes of the outer S1 S2 and inner cylindrical shells, respectively, which are defined 2.4 Eigenvalue extraction in Appendix C. The symbol of [0] indicates a null matrix. The reference kinetic energy of both of the cylindrical For the numerical calculation of natural frequencies and shells, Eq. (21) can be rewritten as Ritz unknown coefficients, the limited expansion terms of admissible modal functions should be considered. So, N is    T T  T  T  Q MQ, (71) the number of expansion terms in the circumferential S S1 S 2 admissible modal functions for s and n. On the other hand, where the number M indicates the number of expansion terms in the axial admissible modal functions for m and k. The M  0  S1 M  , number of expansion terms N and M should be chosen large (72)   0 M   S 2  enough to give required accuracy. The vector Q of parameters in the Ritz expansion is defined as The sub-matrices, M and M in Eq. (72) are the mass S1 S2 matrices of the outer and inner shells respectively, which       are given in Appendix C. The simplified reference kinetic   ~     Q , q V , q  V (66)       ~ energy of fluid, Eq. (59), can be rewritten as      ~    W      T T   Q M Q, (73) L L where q and are the displacement vectors of the 2 container and baffle shells, respectively. The displacement where vectors are defined as follows 0 0 0 0 0 0   U V W         (1,1) (1,1) (1,1) 0 0 0 0 0 0                    0 0 OP  0 0 OS  1 1 M  ,       (74)   U V W L (1,M ) (1,M ) (1,M ) 0 0 0 0 0 0         U V W         ( 2,1) ( 2,1) ( 2,1) 0 0 0 0 0 0                               0 0 OS 0 0 OP   2 2  (67) U , V  , U       U V W ( 2,M ) ( 2,M ) ( 2,M )       Substituting Eqs. (69), (71) and (73) into the Rayleigh          quotient, Eq. (4), and then minimizing it with respect to the       coefficients Q , we obtain U V W i       ( N ,1) ( N ,1) ( N ,1)          KQ (M M ) Q 0, (75)             U V W ( N ,M ) ( N ,M ) ( N ,M )       which is a linear eigenvalue problem for a real, non- and similarly symmetric matrix. ~ ~ ~       U V W (1,1) (1,1) (1,1) 2.5 Coupled modes                ~ ~ ~       The coupling between the baffle and container occurs U V W (1,M ) (1,M ) (1,M )       only when they are vibrating in a same circumferential ~ ~ ~       U V W mode number, n. It can be realized with taking a look at the ( 2,1) ( 2,1) ( 2,1)       elements of the stiffness and the mass matrices, M, M and          ~   ~   ~   (68) U , V  , U K. This conclusion is very close to what was reported by       ~ ~ ~ U V W       ( 2,M ) ( 2,M ) ( 2,M ) Au-Yang (1975). It is worth noting that the greater the gap       between the cylindrical shells is, the less they observe          coupling effects as they vibrate in a same circumferential ~ ~ ~       U V W ( N ,1) ( N ,1) ( N ,1) mode number. If the gap is large enough, the shells are not                influenced by the hydrodynamic coupling. Once the shells       ~ ~ ~ are vibrating with different circumferential mode numbers, U V W       ( N ,M ) ( N ,M ) ( N ,M )       they vibrate independently. It means that they do not affect 238 Ehsan Moshkelgosha, Ehsan Askari, Kyeong-Hoon Jeong and Ali Akbar Shafiee each other via fluid. Actually, it can be assumed that one Table 2 Total number of elements used in the finite element shell vibrates whereas the other shell is not deformed. analysis (b=0.1 m) Number of elements a (S4R) (AC3D8) 3. Numerical result and discussion Outer shell Inner shell fluid A 0.11 5800 4350 39600 In this section, the characteristic equation of a B 0.2 7200 5400 56300 cylindrical fluid-storage tank with a flexible baffle are solved using a written MATLAB code. The material properties and geometry of the system are as follows; the baffle made of steel has Young’s modulus E=206 GPa, rigid inner shell on dynamic characteristics of the FGM Poisson’s ratio of ϑ=0.3, and mass density of ρ =7850 flexible cylindrical tank is also estimated as a function of kg/m . The liquid as water has depth of H=0.4 m, mass the baffle radius. The second considered case stresses on the density of ρ =1000 kg/m . Meanwhile, the container is dynamic analysis of a flexible steel-made baffle and a made of functionally graded materials, such as Al/ZrO and flexible FGM container with material properties listed in Al/Al O , and their material properties are indicated in Table 1. The effect of gradient indices on the first and 2 3 Table 1. The baffle has a radius of b=0.1 m, length of second natural frequencies of the fluid-coupled system for h=0.45 m, and wall thickness of t=0.002 m. The axial gap several circumferential modes is also investigated. between the baffle and container also is d=0.15 m. The Furthermore, the effect of the liquid depth on natural radius of container with a thickness of t=0.002 m is frequencies and the radius of the structures on the mode assumed to be a=0.11 m or 0.2 m with a length of 0.6 m. shapes of coupled system are studied. For all these For verification purposes, a finite element (FE) model of investigations, the verifications of the theoretical natural the fluid-coupled system is also constructed and obtained frequencies of the coupled system using the FEM analyses results are compared to those acquired by the semi- are also provided. analytical simulation presented in this study. In the FE analysis, the FGM container is modelled by considering a 3.1 Case 1: Flexible FGM container with a rigid baffle multi-layered composite as each layer has constant properties and a number of layers are chosen. They could Obstacles like baffles have been usually used in moving therefore be simulated correctly by changing FGM containers to suppress free surface waves. Considering the mechanical properties through thickness direction. A effect of baffles on the hydroelastic vibration and the commercial FEM code, ABAQUS (version 6.5) is used for sloshing phenomenon of containers is of paramount numerical analysis. In order to assure a high precision for importance during design process. The vibration modes of the finite element results, the container shell is divided into baffled containers can be categorized into two modes, 8 layers, Fig. 1. The structural model is constructed with a sloshing modes and bulging modes. Sloshing modes are quadrilateral shell element (S4R) which is a four-node, caused by the oscillation of the fluid free surface, whereas doubly curved shell element with a reduced integration, bulging modes are related to vibrations of the flexible hourglass control, and the finite membrane strain structures coupled with the liquid. Moreover, it is well formulation. The liquid region is meshed with acoustic known that the free surface waves negligibly affect bulging elements (AC3D8), which are eight-node brick acoustic modes of structures that are not extremely flexible. In the elements with a linear interpolation, and the element has present study, our attention is focused on the bulging modes only one unknown pressure per node (Virella et al. 2006). A of the liquid-coupled system. density ρ=1000 kg/m and a bulk modulus K=2.07 GPa, i.e., Tables 3 and 4 summarize natural frequencies of the the properties of water, are used in the computations. fluid-coupled structures shown in Fig. 1. As it can be Acoustic three-dimensional finite elements based on linear observed, the obtained results are in agreement with those wave theory are used to represent the hydrodynamics of of finite element analyses. In addition, it is illustrated that fluid. The location of each node on the constrained surfaces the rigid baffle with a radius of a=0.11 m affects natural of liquid coincides exactly to the location of corresponding frequencies of the tank much more than that with a=0.2 m. node of structure. Along the interface between liquid and it means that the narrower gap between the two structures, structure, the fluid surface is tied to the shell surface in the more reduction in the natural frequencies due to normal direction to satisfy compatibility conditions. This increasing the effect of fluid-structure interaction. contact formulation is based on the master-slave approach, Moreover, the fundamental modes of the system with these in which both surfaces remain in contact throughout two different radii of the container, a=0.11 and 0.2 m, simulation, allowing the transmission of normal forces corresponds to the first mode with the circumferential wave between them. As no pressure was applied to nodes at the number n=2 and 3, respectively. free fluid surface, no sloshing waves are considered in this The effect of the annular gap between the container and study. In addition, the number of elements used in the finite baffle on natural frequencies for the first and second axial element model is listed in Table 2. modes of the system is plotted in Figs. 2 and 3 as a function Two investigations are delineated in the section. First of of the radius of rigid baffle (b). It is illustrated that natural all, a functionally graded baffled container is taken into frequencies decrease as baffle radius increases with a sharp consideration. The baffle is assumed as a vertical cylindrical decrease as the gap is narrower regardless of mode rigid shell, which is submerged into liquid. The effect of numbers. Moreover, it can be observed that the influence of Model Fluid-structure coupling of concentric double FGM shells with different lengths 239 Table 3 Natural frequencies of the coupled system with the FGM container, Al/ZrO FEM FEM This study This study Mode (ABAQUS) (ABAQUS) 300 n,m a=0.11 a=0.2 1,1 200.74 205.08 381.03 376.00 1,2 2,1 102.53 99.44 197.07 193.37 2,2 438.06 430.27 632.61 615.80 3,1 169.47 163.15 126.16 125.04 3,2 374.99 369.12 419.27 409.25 4,1 289.13 281.35 147.36 143.25 4,2 543.89 536.24 330.26 324.10 5,1 477.02 469.61 210.47 202.39 0.1 0.11 0.12 0.13 0.14 0.15 0.16 0.17 0.18 0.19 0.2 5,2 727.83 714.27 347.00 336.32 Fig. 2 Effect of annular gap on natural frequencies of the fluid-coupled system with the fundamental axial mode, Table 4 Natural frequencies of the coupled system with the FGM container, Al/Al O m=1. (H=0.4 m) ( , n=1; , n=2; , 2 3 n=3; , n=4) FEM This study This study FEM (ABAQUS) Mode (ABAQUS) n,m a=0.11 a=0.2 1,1 250.48 243.46 478.99 472.03 1,2 2,1 124.91 121.99 248.86 239.54 2,2 564.87 557.23 814.71 800.25 3,1 213.24 209.04 155.84 152.41 3,2 482.42 476.33 541.79 534.94 4,1 373.39 376.07 182.17 176.27 4,2 705.23 690.41 428.35 413.89 5,1 614.2 602.55 269.57 261.03 5,2 451.52 440.19 0.1 0.11 0.12 0.13 0.14 0.15 0.16 0.17 0.18 0.19 0.2 the baffle radius on natural frequencies is relatively significant for lower circumferential mode numbers due to Fig. 3 Effect of the annular gap on natural frequencies of the separation effect (Askari and Jeong 2010). An increase the fluid-coupled system with the second axial mode, m=2. of circumferential modes produces nodal points along the (H=0.4 m) ( , n=1; , n=2; , n=3; periphery of shell, dividing the circumferential fluid flow , n=4) near the shell. At the same time, it reduces the active vibrating surface of the shell. Consequently, the effect of the liquid inertia on system dynamics decreases, which is called metal on the inside surface of the shell eliminates the abrupt a “separation effect”. transition between the thermal expansion coefficients, offers the thermal resistance and the corrosion protection, and 3.2 Case 2: Flexible FGM container with a flexible increases the load carrying capability. This is possible baffle because the material composition of an FGM changes gradually through the thickness. Therefore, stress Usually ceramic tiles have been utilized to laminate the concentrations due to an abrupt change in material outer part of cylindrical containers, protecting the container properties can be eliminated. from the erosion induced by an aggressive chemical Regarding to industrial applications, the dynamic environment. They also increase the thermal resistance of analyses of a baffled container made of FGMs were studied the container against a hight temperature of surroundings. employing the model developed within this work, together However, these tiles are prone to crack and to debond the with finite element method. Tables 5 and 6 listed natural shell/tile interface due to an abrupt tran sition between frequencies of the coupled system for two sets of material thermal expansion coefficients. In other words, a difference properties, Al/ZrO and Al/Al O , respectively, which in the thermal expansion of the materials causes stress 2 2 3 illustrated small discrepancies, comparing outcomes concentrations at the interface of the ceramic tiles and the acquired by semi-analytical method and finite element shell, which results in cracking or debonding. An FGM method. The effect of gradient indices on the two lowest composed of the ceramics on the outside surface and the Natural frequency Natural frequency 240 Ehsan Moshkelgosha, Ehsan Askari, Kyeong-Hoon Jeong and Ali Akbar Shafiee Table 5 Natural frequencies of the coupled system with the FGM container, Al/ZrO FEM FEM This study This study Mode (ABAQUS) (ABAQUS) n,m a=0.11 a=0.2 1,1 144.93 142.01 312.29 317.52 1,2 444.59 432.77 437.48 422.68 2,1 74.764 72.80 140.74 135.79 2,2 170.66 165.62 202.65 197.48 3,1 118.27 118.00 125.74 123.66 3,2 244.74 236.04 194.12 198.65 4,1 228.84 217.08 147.21 141.70 4,2 394.48 378.22 329.4 315.96 0 5 10 15 5,1 401.55 390.37 210.32 202.15 Gradient index 5,2 575.51 554.95 346.86 337.01 Fig. 4 Gradient index (α) effect with the material Al/Al O 2 3 on the natural frequencies of the fluid-coupled system for the first axial mode, m=1. (b=0.1 m) ( , n=1; Table 6 Natural frequencies of the coupled system with the FGM container, Al/Al O , n=2; , n=3; , n=4) 2 3 FEM FEM This study This study Mode (ABAQUS) (ABAQUS) n,m a=0.11 a=0.2 1,1 160.48 157.06 328.53 332.05 1,2 515.1 506.23 524.2 513.94 2,1 80.472 77.34 141.83 137.14 2,2 196.17 189.67 254.2 249.00 3,1 126.89 129.60 154.73 158.20 3,2 285.58 277.82 194.96 189.85 4,1 255.72 248.45 181.94 174.37 4,2 433.8 425.02 376.04 368.22 5,1 456.61 444.76 269.35 260.17 5,2 633.65 621.88 451.29 443.76 0 5 10 15 Gradient index natural frequencies was also investigated and illustrated in Fig. 5 Gradient index (α) effect with the material Al/Al O 2 3 Figs. 4 and 5 for Al/Al O and Figs. 6 and 7 for Al/ZrO . It on the natural frequencies of the fluid-coupled system for 2 3 2 could be observed from the figures that the natural the second axial mode, m=1. (b=0.1 m) ( , n=1; frequencies gradually decrease and converge to the certain , n=2; , n=3; , n=4) values as the gradient index increases. It can be explained that an increase of the gradient index indicates that the 260 dominant material properties of the container shell changes from the ceramic to Aluminum. When the gradient index, α is 0, the mechanical properties of the shell converge the ceramics’ properties, Al O or ZrO . When the gradient 2 3 2 index, α converges to infinite, the properties of the structure, however, approach that of Aluminium. Natural frequencies dominantly decrease as the gradient index is within the range of 0-5. It should be noted that the gradient indices affect the natural frequencies of Al/Al O shells 2 3 more than those of Al/ZrO shells. Figs. 8-11 show the first four mode shapes of liquid- coupled baffled container with radii of 0.11 and 0.2 m for n=3 and 4. It is worth mentioning that the normalized amplitude of the baffle is about the same as that of the 0 5 10 15 Gradient index container as the annular gap is a=0.11, showing a strong Fig. 6 Gradient index (α) effect with the material Al/ZrO interaction between two concentric shells, Figs. 8 and 9. on the natural frequencies of the fluid-coupled system for Furthermore, it can be observed some modes are the distinct the first axial mode, m=1. (b=0.1 m) ( , n=1; in-phases and the others are the distinct out -of-phases. , n=2; , n=3; , n=4) However, the normalized vibration amplitude of the baffle Natural frequency Natural frequency Natural frequency Fluid-structure coupling of concentric double FGM shells with different lengths 241 .6 0.6 .4 0.4 .2 0.2 0 0 -0.2 -0.1 0 0.1 0.2 -0.2 -0.1 0 0.1 0.2 (a) (b) .8 0.8 .6 0.6 .4 0.4 .2 0.2 0 0 -0.2 -0.1 0 0.1 0.2 -0.2 -0.1 0 0.1 0.2 (c) (d) 0 5 10 15 Gradient index Fig. 10 First four mode shapes of the baffled container for Fig. 7 Gradient index (α) effect with the material Al/ZrO n=3 and a=0.2 on the natural frequencies of the fluid-coupled system for the second axial mode, m=1. (b=0.1 m) ( , n=1; .6 0.6 , n=2; , n=3; , n=4) .4 0.4 6 0.6 .2 0.2 4 0.4 0 0 -0.2 -0.1 0 0.1 0.2 -0.2 -0.1 0 0.1 0.2 (a) (b) 2 0.2 .8 0.8 0 0 -0.2 -0.1 0 0.1 0.2 -0.2 -0.1 0 0.1 0.2 (a) (b) .6 0.6 8 0.8 .4 0.4 6 0.6 .2 0.2 4 0.4 0 0 -0.2 -0.1 0 0.1 0.2 -0.2 -0.1 0 0.1 0.2 (c) (d) 2 0.2 Fig. 11 First four mode shapes of the baffled container for 0 0 n=4 and a=0.2 -0.2 -0.1 0 0.1 0.2 -0.2 -0.1 0 0.1 0.2 (c) (d) Fig. 8 First four mode shapes of the baffled container for n=3 and a=0.11 independently comparing with the case with the narrower gap. 6 0.6 4 0.4 4. Conclusions 2 0.2 A semi-analytical method to study the coupled dynamics 0 0 -0.2 -0.1 0 0.1 0.2 -0.2 -0.1 0 0.1 0.2 of FGM containers with flexible baffles was developed (a) (b) taking fluid-structure interaction into account. Fundamental 8 0.8 frequencies and modes of the system were acquired using the Rayleigh quotient, the Galerkin method, the collocation 6 0.6 method and the superposition principle. The theoretical 4 0.4 model enabled us to assess vibration of concentric shells coupled via fluid. Furthermore, the effect of functionally- 2 0.2 graded materials on the fluid-coupled vibration of the 0 0 system was evaluated employing this methodology. -0.2 -0.1 0 0.1 0.2 -0.2 -0.1 0 0.1 0.2 (c) (d) It was concluded that fundamental frequencies of the Fig. 9 First four mode shapes of the baffled container for coupled system decrease as the baffle radius increases, that n=4, a=0.11 is, the radial gap decreases. In particular, a sharp reduce in frequencies was observed as the radial gap became narrower regardless of mode numbers. In addition, the differs from that of the container, for an annular gap of gradient index affected the system frequencies which a=0.20, due to a weak interaction between the structures via decreased and converged to the certain values. The natural the liquid, Figs. 10 and 11. That is to say, the shells move frequencies also decreased as the container fluid depth Natural frequency 242 Ehsan Moshkelgosha, Ehsan Askari, Kyeong-Hoon Jeong and Ali Akbar Shafiee Gavrilyuk, I., Lukovsky, I., Trotsenko, Y. and Timokh, A. (2006), raised. The first four mode shapes of the fluid-coupled “Sloshing in a vertical circular cylindrical tank with an annular system with a=0.11 and 0.2 for n=3 and 4 were also baffle. Part 1. Linear fundamental solutions”, J. Eng. Math., 54, presented. It was illustrated that the baffle and the container 71-88. vibrated with about similar normalized amplitude for Hasheminejad, S.M. and Rajabi, M. (2007), “Acoustic resonance narrower gaps such as 0.01 m, showing a strong interaction scattering from a submerged functionally graded cylindrical between the shells. According to mathematical formulation shell”, J. 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(2009), “The vibration and stability behavior of Conference on Nanochannels, Microchannels, and freely supported FGM conical shells subjected to external Minichannels, American Society of Mechanical Engineers, pressure”, Compos. Struct., 89, 356-366. 1047-1054. Sofiyev, A.H. (2010), “Dynamic response of an FGM cylindrical Askari, E., Jeong, K.H. and Amabili, M. (2013), “Hydroelastic shell under moving loads”, Compos. Struct., 93, 58-66. vibration of circular plates immersed in a liquid-filled container Sofiyev, A.H. and Kuruoglu, V. (2015), “Dynamic instability of with free surface”, J. Sound Vib., 332, 3064-3085. three-layered cylindrical shells containing an FGM interlayer”, Au-Yang, M.K. (1975), Free Vibration of Fluid-coupled Coaxial Thin Wall. Struct., 93, 10-21. Cylinders of Different Lengths, NPGD-M-320, Babcock & Virella, J.C., Godoy, L.A. and Suarez, L.E. (2006), “Fundamental Wilcox. modes of tank-liquid systems under motions”, Eng. 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(2012), “Liquid sloshing in Shapes, Van Nostrand Reinhold Company, London. rigid cylindrical container with multiple rigid annular baffles: Chen, W.Q., Bian, Z.G. and Ding, H.J. (2004), “Three- Free vibration”, J. Fluid. Struct., 34, 138-156. dimensional vibration analysis of fluid-filled orthotropic FGM Wang, J.D., Lo, S.H. and Zhou, D. (2013), “Sloshing of liquid in cylindrical shells”, Int. J. Mech. Sci., 46, 159-171. rigid cylindrical container with multiple rigid annular baffles: Cho, J.R., Lee, H.W. and Kim, K.W. (2002), “Free vibration Lateral excitations”, J. Fluid. Struct., 42, 421-436. analysis of baffled liquid-storage tanks by the structural- Zhou, D., Wang, J.D. and Liu, W.Q., (2014), “Nonlinear free acoustic finite element formulation”, J. Sound Vib., 258(5), 847- sloshing of liquid in rigid cylindrical container with a rigid annular baffle”, Nonlin. Dyn., 78, 2557-2576. Ebrahimian, M., Noorian, M.A. and Haddadpour, H. (2014), Zhu, F. (1995), “Rayleigh-Ritz method in coupled fluid-structure “Equivalent mechanical model of liquid sloshing in multi- interacting systems and its applications”, J. Sound Vib., 186, baffled containers”, Eng. Anal. Bound. Elem., 47, 82-95. 543-550. Eftekhari, S.A. (2016), “Pressure-based and potential-based differential quadrature procedures for free vibration of circular plates in contact with fluid”, Latin Am. J. Solid. Struct., 13(4), CC 1-22. Fluid-structure coupling of concentric double FGM shells with different lengths 243 Appendix A: the unknown matrices in Eq. (46)  A  B  1sk 1sk     In this appendix, the unknown matrices in Eq. (46) are A   , B       sk sk     given in detail. Unknown matrices in Eq. (A1) are as (B.4) A B fsk fsk     follows x  ( j  1) , j  1, ,N Θ A Θ B Θ , j (A.1) 1 ni 2 ni 3 where x are selected as points used in the collocation Θ ( j, m) I ( b) method. Moreover, unknown matrices in Eq. (B.5) are as 1 n m jm follows    I ( a) n m R B  R A  R (B.5) Θ ( j, m) I ( b) K ( b)  1 sk 2 sk 3 2  n m n m  mj K ( a)  n m  in which sub-matrices on the boundary γ are as follows 2 K ( b) n m  I ( a)  (A.2) n f   H K ( a) R ( j, f ) I ( b) K ( b) n m 1 n f n f Θ ( j)     3 K ( a) n f H   m1     ( x) cos( x) d x    i m mj 0  cos( x )   (B.6) f j A B     R ( j, f ) I ( b) cos( x ), 1ni 1ni 2 n f f j     A   , B   .     ni ni R ( j) 0,       A B  m ni  m ni and on the boundary γ′ Unknown matrices in Eq. (A3) are also defined as follows    I ( a) n f P A  P B  P (A.3) 1 ni 2 ni 3   R ( j, f ) I ( b) K ( b) 1 n f n s   K ( a) n f   (B.7) P ( j, m) I ( b) , 1 n m mj  cos( x ) f j    I ( a) R ( j, f ) 0, R ( j) Λ (x ) n m 2 3 k j   P ( j, m) I ( b) K ( b)  2 n m n m mj   K ( a)  n m     I ( a) n m      I ( b) K ( b)  , n m n m mj (A.4)   K ( a) Appendix C: the stiffness and the mass matrices  n m   K ( b) K ( b)  n m n m P ( j)    3  mj mj In this appendix, the stiffness and the mass matrices of K ( a) K ( a) m1  n m n m  the container and the baffle are given in detail. The stiffness matrix of the baffle is given by   ( x) cos( x) d x, i m 11 12 13   K K K   21 22 23 K  K K K (C.1) S 2   31 32 33 Appendix B: the unknown matrices in Eq. (58).   K K K   kl In this appendix, the unknown matrices in Eq. (58) are where the elements of sub-matrices K ,(k,l=1,2,3) are given given in detail. Unknown matrices in Eq. (B1) are as by Eq. (C.2) follows   Λ A L  Λ 11 s i K  b d x Q A  Q B  Q S injs c (B.1) 2 2 1 sk 2 sk 3 L h   x x i j  Λ L  ns Λ s i Q ( j, f ) I ( b) cos( x ), Q ( j) 0, 1 d x , i, j  1, M 1 n f f j 3 L h 2b x x 2  I ( a)  n f in which (B.2)   cos(n ) cos(s ) d Q ( j, f )  I ( b) K ( b) c    2 n f n f K ( a)   (C.2) n f   2 and   sin( n ) sin( s ) d  cos( x ), on  f j   L A  Λ and 12 s i K  2n Λ d x injs  c j Lh 2 x   Q ( j, f )  I ( b) cos( x ), Q ( j, f )  0, 1 n f f j 2 (B.3) L Λ   Λ Q ( j)  Λ ( x ), on  j 3 k j 1s d x s  Lh x x 244 Ehsan Moshkelgosha, Ehsan Askari, Kyeong-Hoon Jeong and Ali Akbar Shafiee L A  L   A  Λ 13 s i s c i   K  Λ d x K   2n  d x 12  c j in js j injs 2 2   0 L h  2 x x i  (1 ) D L    22 s s j K  ( A b ) injs s 1s d x , 2 b x x L Λ L Λ ns D i c s d x (  A ) Λ Λ d x, s i j L   A   L h L h x x b b s c i     d x 13 j injs 2  L x n D s 23 c s K  ( A  ) Λ Λ d x injs s i j L  Lh 1 D   b b s i K   A a  d x   22 injs s s 2 a x x   L Λ (1 )s Λ s i D d x L ns  D  s c s Lh   A  d x,   s i j b x x 2  0 a a   2 2  L n  Λ n  s D  c i c s  Λ d x ,   K   A    d x j  2 23 injs s i j  2 Lh   b x a a   A  33 s c  L  D  K  Λ Λ d x s i injs i j  1s d x Lh s b  a x x  L  Λ  Λ i 2 D b d x    s c i 2 2 Lh n  d x , x x c j   2  0 x 2 2 2 s   Λ (ns)  c i c A s c  2 Λ d x  j K    dx  2 3 33 i j Lh injs b x b L L Λ  2 2 2 1 Λ j  i L  L  s  i i Λ Λ d x 2ns d x i j s  D a d x 2  d x    s c c j Lh L h  2 2 2 b x x 0 0 x x a x The mass matrix of the baffle is given by L L   (ns)  1  c i   d x 2ns d x i j s  3   0 0 a a x x   M 0 0   The mass matrix of the container is written M  0 M 0 (C.3) S 2     0 0 M M  0 0       M  0 M  0 , (C.7) kk S1 22   where the elements of sub-matrices M ,(k=1,2,3) are given   0 0 M  by  33  L Λ where the elements of sub-matrices [M ], (i=1,2,3) are 1 Λ j ii 11 i M  b t  d x, injs s 2 c given by Lh   x x i j (C.4) L   22 33 i M   a t d x, M  M  b t  Λ ( x)Λ ( x) d x, injs injs s 2 c i j 11 in js s 1 c   Lh 0  x x i j (C.8) i, j  1 M L M  M   a t  ( x) ( x) d x 22 33 s 1 c i j in js in js The partitioned stiffness matrix K associated with the S1 container is written as follows   K  K  K  11 12 13   K  K  K  K  , (C.5)   S1 12 22 23 T T   K  K  K  13 23 33   where the elements of sub-matrices [K ], (i,j=1,2,3) are ij given by Eq. (C.6)    A  L   s c i K   a d x 11 injs 2 2   x x i j  (C.6) L    ns 1 d x , 2a x x http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Condensed Matter arXiv (Cornell University)

Fluid-structure coupling of concentric double FGM shells with different lengths

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10.12989/sem.2017.61.2.231
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Abstract

Structural Engineering and Mechanics, Vol. 61, No. 2 (2017) 231-244 DOI: https://doi.org/10.12989/sem.2017.61.2.231 231 Fluid-structure coupling of concentric double FGM shells with different lengths 1 2 3 4 Ehsan Moshkelgosha , Ehsan Askari , Kyeong-Hoon Jeong and Ali Akbar Shafiee Research Department, Samin Sanaat Shaigan Company, Isfahan, Iran CMEMS - Center for Microelectromechanical Systems, University of Minho, Azurém, 4800-058 Guimarães, Portugal Mechanical Engineering Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 989-111 Daedeok-daero, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-353, Republic of Korea Mechanical Engineering Department, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan, Iran (Received May 1, 2016, Revised September 8, 2016, Accepted September 25, 2016) Abstract. The aim of this study is to develop a semi-analytical method to investigate fluid-structure coupling of concentric double shells with different lengths and elastic behaviours. Co-axial shells constitute a cylindrical circular container and a baffle submerged inside the stored fluid. The container shell is made of functionally graded materials with mechanical properties changing through its thickness continuously. The baffle made of steel is fixed along its top edge and submerged inside fluid such that its lower edge freely moves. The developed approach is verified using a commercial finite element computer code. Although the model is presented for a specific case in the present work, it can be generalized to investigate coupling of shell- plate structures via fluid. It is shown that the coupling between concentric shells occurs only when they vibrate in a same circumferential mode number, n. It is also revealed that the normalized vibration amplitude of the inner shell is about the same as that of the outer shell, for narrower radial gaps. Moreover, the natural frequencies of the fluid-coupled system gradually decrease and converge to the certain values as the gradient index increases. Keywords: coupled vibration; concentric shells; fluid-structure interaction; functionally graded materials filled functionally graded cylindrical orthotropic shells with 1. Introduction arbitrary thickness. Hasheminejad and Rajabi (2007) developed an exact methodology under the umbrella of the Functionally graded materials (FGMs) are advanced inherent background coefficients to consider the scattering composites, microscopically engineered to have a smooth of time-harmonic plane acoustic waves by a thick hollow spatial variation of material properties in order to improve isotropic FG cylinder immersed in and filled with non- overall performance. Typically, FGMs are composed from a viscous compressible fluids. Sheng and Wang (2008) mixture of metals and ceramics and are further reported the results of an investigation on the vibration of characterized by a smooth and continuous change of the functionally graded cylindrical shells with a flowing fluid, mechanical properties from one surface to another. FGMs embedded in an elastic medium, under mechanical and are regarded as one of the most promising candidates for thermal loads. The vibration and stability of freely future intelligent composites in many engineering fields supported FGM truncated and complete conical shells such as heat exchanger tubes, biomedical implants, subjected to uniform lateral and hydrostatic pressures were flywheels, blades, storage tanks, pressure vessels, and investigated by Sofiyev (2009). Iqbal et al. (2009) general wear and corrosion resistant coatings or for joining investigated the vibration characteristics of a functionally dissimilar materials in aerospace and automobile industries. graded material circular cylindrical shell filled with fluid As the dynamic parameters play an important role in the using a wave propagation approach. Sofiyev (2010) design of modern advanced structures, many valuable presented an analytical study on the dynamic behavior of studies on dynamic characteristics of inhomogeneous the infinitely-long, FGM cylindrical shell subjected to structures and in particular FGM cylindrical shells could be combined action of the axial tension, internal compressive found in the literature. Moreover, dynamic behaviour of load and ring-shaped compressive pressure. The structures coupled with fluid is of great importance in characteristics of beam-mode stability of fluid-conveying various scientific and engineering applications, such as shell systems were investigated by Shen et al. (2014) for fluid-storage tanks, fuel tanks of space vehicles, nuclear shells with boundary conditions, using a FEM algorithm. reactors, and tower-like structures. Chen et al. (2004) Wali et al. (2015) studied free vibration response of FGM considered the free vibration of simply supported, fluid- shells by using an efficient three-dimensional shell model. Sofiyev and Kuruoglu (2015) studied the dynamic instability of three-layered cylindrical shells containing a Corresponding author, Ph.D. functionally graded (FG) interlayer subjected to static and E-mail: ehsanaskary@gmail.com time dependent periodic axial compressive loads. Copyright © 2017 Techno-Press, Ltd. http://www.techno-press.org/?journal=sem&subpage=8 ISSN: 1225-4568 (Print), 1598-6217 (Online) 232 Ehsan Moshkelgosha, Ehsan Askari, Kyeong-Hoon Jeong and Ali Akbar Shafiee In addition, obstacles like baffles are usually used as fluid. damping devices to suppress the fluid sloshing motion in Thus, this study considers the dynamic analysis of a fluid-structure systems. Sloshing is a potential source of partially fluid-filled cylindrical container with a flexible disturbance in fluid storage containers. The fluid in baffle, acquiring coupled modes and eigen-frequencies. The containers displays a free-surface fluctuation when the container is made of functionally graded materials with container is subjected to an external excitation, like an mechanical properties changing through its thickness earthquake. This fluid sloshing may be a direct or indirect continuously. A semi-analytical method is developed taking cause of the unexpected instability and failure in some fluid-structure interaction into account. The fluid region is engineering applications (Wang et al. 2016, Zhou et al. divided into two regions, namely the inner region and the 2014, Askari et al. 2013, Askari et al. 2010). Some outer region on the basis of the radius of the inner shell. The examples are the vibration analysis of fluid-storage tanks velocity potential of both fluid regions is described in terms under earthquake waves, nuclear fuel storage pool, of the Bessel functions and the sinusoidal functions biomechanical systems, fuel storage tanks of aerospace appropriate to the boundary condition between the two vehicles and cargo tanks of LNG. To suppress sloshing, distinct fluid regions. Using the collocation method, the some internal bodies or baffles are generally placed in fluid Galerkin method and the superposition principle, storage tanks. It is well known that using such baffles relationships between the unknown coefficients of the results in energy dissipation and reduction in sloshing velocity potential and the modal function of the shells are amplitude and hydrodynamic loads. In designing baffled obtained as matrix forms. Finally, the Rayleigh-Ritz method containers, considering the sloshing phenomenon and the is used to derive the frequency equation of the system. The structural vibration are essential. It can be noted that baffled developed methodology is applied to specific cases of fluid- containers have two groups of modes: sloshing and bulging coupled systems and verified comparing with a finite ones. Sloshing modes are caused by the oscillation of fluid element analysis. free surface, whereas bulging modes are related to vibrations of the structure. In fact, it is well known that the effect of the free surface waves is low on bulging modes for 2. Mathematical formulation structures that are not extremely flexible (Morand and Ohayon 1995, Askari and Daneshmand 2010, Askari and Consider a baffle of length h, radius b, and uniform Daneshmand 2009). In the present paper, attention is thickness t submerged inside a cylindrical container of focused on the bulging modes of baffled containers. length L, radius a, and uniform thickness t , as it is depicted Cho et al. (2002) presented the fluid-structure in Fig. 1. The baffle is fixed at its top and its lower edge interaction problems of fluid-storage containers with baffle freely moves in fluid domain. Meanwhile, the bottom of the by the structural-acoustic finite element formulation. Biswal container is rigid and flat, whereas its lateral wall is et al. (2004) developed a finite element code and flexible. The container is assumed to be clamped-free and investigated the influence of a baffle on the dynamic contains a fluid with a depth H, having a free surface. response of a partially fluid-filled cylindrical tank. Moreover, the radial, circumferential and axial coordinates Gavrilyuk et al. (2006) presented fundamental solutions of are illustrated by r, θ and x, respectively. The container is the linearized problem on fluid sloshing in a vertical made of functionally graded materials and its mechanical cylindrical baffled container. A pressure-based finite properties change continuously according to gradually element technique has been developed to analyse the slosh varying the volume fraction of the constituent materials, dynamics of a partially filled rigid container with bottom- usually in the thickness direction (Hosseini-Hashemi et al. mounted submerged components by Mitra and 2010). The fluid-storage tank is made of a composition of Sinhamahapatra (2007). Biswal and Bhattacharyya (2010) ceramic and metal with varying substance from its outer employed finite element method to investigate the influence surface to inner surface, respectively. The modulus of of composite baffles on the coupled dynamics of containers. elasticity and density vary linearly through the shell Askari et al. (2011) proposed a semi-analytical method to thickness according to a power-law distribution as study the effect of rigid internal bodies on partially fluid- (1) E(z) (E  E )V (z) E , c a b a filled containers. Wang et al. (2012, 2013) studied the effect of multiple rigid baffles on free and force vibration of a  ( z) (  )V ( z) , (2) c a b a rigid cylindrical fluid-storage tank. Ebrahimian et al. (2014) developed a numerical model based on the boundary in which the subscripts a and c represent metallic and element method to determine an equivalent mechanical ceramic constituents, respectively, and the volume fraction model for fluid storage containers with multiple baffles. V may be given by (Hosseini-Hashemi et al. 2010, Shafiee Although many remarkable studies have previously et al. 2014) been conducted on dynamic analyses of shells made of z 1 functionally-graded materials, fluid-coupled vibration of   (3) V ( z)    FGM containers with baffles has not been investigated yet, t 2   based on the best knowledge of the authors. Moreover, where α is the gradient index and takes only a positive investigating the influence of baffle flexibility on vibration value. z is measured from the middle surface of the shell of partially fluid-filled container, and vice versa, is of towards outside, −t/2≤z≤t/2. However, the Poisson’s ratio is paramount importance in primary design stages of baffled taken 0.3 over simulation. Typical values for metal and containers due to the coupled vibration of structures through Fluid-structure coupling of concentric double FGM shells with different lengths 233 Fig. 1 a schematic representation of a partially fluid-filled cylindrical baffled container paired with a 2D slice of the container wall divided into 8 layers and made from a combination of ceramic and metal varying along the thickness direction Table 1 Material properties used in the FG shells where the middle surface of the shell is delineated as Ω in Properties Metal Ceramic Eq. (5), and the membrane stiffness is defined as Aluminum (Al) Zirconia (ZrO ) Aluminia (Al O ) 2 2 3 t / 2 E( z) E (GPa) 70 200 380 K  dz, (6) 3  2  t / 2 ρ (kg/m ) 2702 5700 3800 1 ( z)   t / 2 E( z) ( z) K  dz,  (7)  x  2 ceramics used in the present article are listed in Table 1.  t / 2 1 ( z)  Moreover, the fluid is water with a mass density ρ , which t / 2 is assumed to be inviscid and incompressible.  K  G( z)dz, (8)  t / 2 2.1 Rayleigh-Ritz method the bending stiffness In order to obtain the characteristic equations of a t / 2 E( z) z D dz, (9) dynamic system, the Rayleigh-Ritz method can be used by  2  t / 2 1 ( z) introducing the Rayleigh quotient (Zhu, 1995), for the    dynamic system presented in this study, which is written as  t / 2 E( z) ( z) z D   dz, (10)  x U  U 2 S S 2  t / 2 1 2  1 ( z)    (4)     T  T  T S S L  1 2 t / 2 D  G( z) z dz, (11) where U and U are the potential energies associated  S S  t / 2 1 2 with the container and baffle, respectively. and T T 1 2 and the membrane-bending coupled stiffness also are the reference kinetic energies of the shells, while t / 2 E( z) z T is the simplified fluid reference kinetic energy due to C  dz, (12)  2  t / 2 shell movements. Finally, ω is the natural frequency of the 1 ( z)  fluid-coupled system.   Knowing that the material properties of a cylindrical  t / 2  E( z) ( z) z  C  dz, (13) shell made of functionally graded materials change x   2  t / 2  1 ( z) continuously through its thickness, the general potential  energy of the shell, according to the assumption of shell  t / 2 theory, is as follows (Leissa 1969, Soedel 2003) C  G( z) zdz, (14)  t / 2 K K 2 2 G 2 U  [ (  ) K (  )  ) Rd Furthermore, the strain-displacement relations of the x  x x  x  2 2 FGM cylindrical shell in the cylindrical coordinates are the D D 2 2 G 2 same as homogeneous ones, the strains and curvatures of  [ (  ) D     )Rd] x  x x  x  (5) 2 2 the shell at the its middle surface are as follows  C (    ) C (    ) x x   x x   x  u    (15)   ,       x    C   )Rd , d dx d x    G x x 234 Ehsan Moshkelgosha, Ehsan Askari, Kyeong-Hoon Jeong and Ali Akbar Shafiee  1  w     (16)     (  w),      v ( x, ) V Λ ( x) sin( s ) 2 (27) 2  ks k  a    s1 k1   1 u v   (17)         ,  x w (x, ) W Λ (x) cos(s )  a  x  2  ks k (28) s1 k1  w     where , and are parameters of the Rayleigh- (18) U V W   ,       ks x   ks ks     x  Ritz expansio n. T he symbols, s and k ind icate the circumferential wave number and the axial mode number,  1  w v   respectively. The dry beam function Λ (x) is used as the (19)     (  ),      2 2 a d mi s s i b l e f u n c t i o n , s a t is f yi n g i mp o s e d b o u n d a r y      a  conditions and ϕ can be calculated from the characteristic equations (Blevins 1979). After extracting the potential    1  w v (20)      ),   (2  ),  x energies and kinetic energies of cylindrical structures, the  a x x   only remaining term to be computed in Eq. (4) is the where u, v, and w are the axial, circumferential and radial  simplified fluid kinetic energy due to shell movements, , displacements of the shell on its middle surface, which can be written by using the Green’s theorem respectively. The reference kinetic energy of the FGM shell, (Amabili et al. 1998) as discussed by Soedel (2003), is given by 1   2 T     d S 1 L L  (29)    2  T   q qd   S (21) I II I 1 II ~ 2 2 2 w h e r e S  S  S  S t h a t S a n d a r e t h e  (u ( x, ) v ( x, ) w ( x, )d 2 2 2 1 2  lateral wet surface of the baffle in the regions (I) and (II), ~ respectively. The symbol, S , is the lateral wet surface of the where  is the surface mass density written as follows cylindrical container. ς also is the normal direction to the t / 2 surface S of the fluid domain. Furthermore, the variable, φ    (z)dz, (22)  in Eq. (29) is the fluid displacement potential. t / 2 To apply the Rayleigh-Ritz method, the modal 2.2 Velocity and displacement potentials functions, (Blevins 1979), of the container shell with any boundary conditions are written as a linear combination of The inviscid, incompressible and irrotational fluid admissible functions permits the introduction of a velocity potential for the fluid   motion (Eftekhari 2016). The liquid velocity potential can 1  ( x) u ( x, ) U cos(n ), 1  mn be expressed as  x n1 m1 (23) ~ i t 2 m  (r, , x,t) i (r, , x) e , i 1. (30)   where the fluid displacement potential φ satisfies the   superposition principle stated in Eq. (31), (Amabili et al. v ( x, ) V  ( x) sin( n ) (24) 1 mn m  1998). n1 m1    (31) 1 2   w (x, ) W  (x) cos(n ) (25) 1 mn m The fluid displacement potential associated with the  n1 m1 motion of the cylindrical container is denoted by φ , while the baffle is assumed to be rigid. Conversely, φ is the fluid where U , V and W are the parameters of the Rayleigh- 2 mn mn mn displacement potential in conjunction with the motion of the Ritz expansion; the symbols n and m are the circumferential baffle when the container is considered stationary. In order wave number and the axial mode number, respectively. The to formulate fluid motion, the fluid domain can be assumed dry beam function, ψ (x), is used as the admissible function to consist of two separated parts, regions (I) and (II) as satisfying imposed boundary conditions and β can be follows calculated from the characteristic equations based on boundary conditions, as discussed by Blevins (1979). The    Region I  r, , x : r  b, x H modal functions for the cylindrical baffle are also given by (32) Region II r, , x : b r  a, x H.   ~ 1 Λ ( x)  k k u ( x, ) U cos(s ),  (26) That is to say, the region (I) is the cylindrical inner 2  ks k  x L s1 k1 liquid domain, and the region (II) the annular outer liquid domain. Three interfacing surfaces between the shells and fluid are defined as shown in Eq. (33) and Fig. 1. Fluid-structure coupling of concentric double FGM shells with different lengths 235 relation term by term between 0 and H, the coefficient, C mni  (r, , x) : r  b , 0  2 , x L h can be written as a function of the unknown coefficient,  (r, , x) : r  b , 0  2 , L h x H (33) B , by the well known properties of orthogonal mni trigonometric functions.   (r, , x) : r  a , 0  2 , 0 x H 1 2 where the symbol γ represents the interface between two C   ( x) cos( x) d x mni i m K ( a) H (42) fluid regions along the axial gap between the inner shell and n m the container bottom. In addition, γ′ is the interfacing  B I ( a) mni n m boundary between the fluid and the inner shell along either where  and  indicate the derivatives of I and K , region (I) or region (II), while γ′′ is the fluid-interfacing I K n n n n respectively. Moreover, the compatibility conditions and the boundary of the outer shell in region (II). boundary conditions, Eqs. (35)-(39), must be so satisfied as to be found the unknown coefficients contained in Eqs. 2.2.1 Fluid displacement potential associated with the (43)-(45). container, φ The spatial displacement potential, φ , can be written for II  both fluid regions (Askari et al. 2013).  along    r (43)      rb r I I II II   W  ,   W  , (34) rb 1  mn mn 1  mn mn 0 along m1n1 m1n1 II I I II (44) where and are the displacement potential   along  ,   1 1 mn mn functions in the fluid regions (I) and (II) induced by the II  vibration of the outer shell, respectively. The modal   0 along  . (45) r parameter W is used for the Rayleigh-Ritz expansion mn rb defined in Eq. (25). The displacement potential should Solving the above equations, simultaneously by satisfy not only the Laplace equation of Eq. (35), but also employing the Galerkin method leads to Eq. (46) boundary conditions and compatibility equation of Eqs. (36)-(39).   Θ A Θ B Θ 1 ni 2 ni 3  (46) P A  P B  P 1 ni 2 ni 3    0 , (35)  ′ ′ in which the unknown coefficients matrices, A and B , ni ni   0 , along L h x H , (36) are given in Appendix A. r rb 2.2.2 Fluid displacement potential associated with the   0 , (37) baffle, φ x x 0 The fluid displacement potential for each fluid region is assumed to be   0, (38) x H     ~ ~ I I II II   W Ω ,   W Ω (47) 2  ks ks 2  ks ks  k1 s1 k1 s1  w along 0 x H , (39) r r a where is the parameters of the Ritz expansion defined ks I II The problem defined by the above relations allows the in Eq. (28). Ω and Ω are displacement potential ks ks separation of spatial variables in the cylindrical coordinate eigen-functions in liquid regions (I) and (II), respectively. system for each liquid region The displacement liquid potential should satisfy the Laplace equation given in Eq. (48) and boundary conditions of Eqs.   cos(n ) A cos( x)I ( r), (49)-(52). in  mni m n m m1 (40) (48)    0 ,  (2m 1)   ,  2H  w , along L h x H (49) r rb and  II  0 (50)   cos(n ) cos( x) in  m x x 0 (41) m1   B I ( r) C K ( r)   0 (51) mni n m mni n m 2 x H ′ ′ ′ where A , B and C are unknown coefficients mni mni mni   0, along 0 x H depending on integers m, n and i. I and K are the modified (52) n n r Bessel functions of the first and second kind of order n, ra respectively. Using Eq. (39) and integrating the resultant In the inner liquid region (I), the separation of the 236 Ehsan Moshkelgosha, Ehsan Askari, Kyeong-Hoon Jeong and Ali Akbar Shafiee variables gives Although there are no contacts between the shells, they are interactive through fluid, which is called as the coupling (12) ( 21) Ω  cos(s ) A cos( x) I ( r ), ks  fsk f s f effect of fluid. In fact, two terms of and in T T L L f 1 (53) Eq. (59) are the reference kinetic energy terms associated  (2 f  1) with the interaction between the shells via fluid.   2H 2 H I II (12) T   (  ) w b d x d (60) and in the outer liquid region (II), it gives L L 1 1 rb 2   0 Lh II 2 H (21) II Ω  cos(s )B cos( x) ks  fsk f   T    w adxd (61) L L 2 1   ra f 1 0 0 (54)  I ( a)  so s f  I ( r) K ( r)   s f s f       1 ~ K ( a) (12)  s f    T   b W W L L  in js n1 s1 i1 j1 m1 where A and B are unknown coefficients. It also is fsk fsk    necessary to ensure that fluid displacement potentials and I ( a) n m   B I ( b) K ( b)   mni n m n m  dynamic displacement normal to wet surfaces are K ( a)  n m  continuous along γ, and Eq. (49) should be satisfied along γ′ 2 K ( b) n m (Askari et al. 2011). These requirements are listed in Eqs.  ( x) cos( x) d x  i m (62) H K ( a) (55)-(57). n m  A I ( b) mni n m II  2 H 2 on  cos( x)Λ ( x)dx cos(n ) cos(s )d m j   r 0  Lh (55) rb r rb 1 ~ w on  W OS W  2 II II and (56)   on 2 2      ( 21) T   a W W B II L L  is jn fsi  2 n1 s1 f 1 i1 j1  w on (57) r  I  rb s  (I ( a) ( a)K ( a))   s f f s f  K   (63) Substituting Eqs. (53) and (54) into Eqs. (55)-(57) and 2 employing the collocation method, the unknown cos(n ) cos(s )d cos( x) ( x)dx s j 0 0 coefficients, A and B can be written as a matrix form of fsk fsk Eq. (58). 1 ~  W OS W Q A  Q B  Q 1 sk 2 sk 3  (58) Moreover, the term representing the interaction between R A  R B  R  1 sk 2 sk 3 the liquid and outer shell in Eq. (44) is 2 H Matrices existing in Eq. (58) are defined in Appendix B. 1 (1) II T     w adxd L L 1 r a 1   0 0      2.3 Reference fluid kinetic energy   a W W L  in js n1 s1 i1 j1 m1 The total kinetic energy of fluid can be obtained  I ( a)  expanding Eq. (29), which is a summation of the kinetic n m  B I ( a) K ( a)    mni n m n m energies of liquid as shown in Eq. (59).  K ( a)  n m  (64) 1 H K ( a)   2 n m T     ( x) cos( x) d x  L L i m  2  H K ( a) n m  2 H I I II II H 2  (  )w  (  )w  b d x d 1 2 2 1 2 2 rb   cos( x) ( x)dx cos(n ) cos(s )d 0 L h m j (59)  0 0 2 H  II  II      w adxd L 1 2 1   r a  W OP W 0 0 ( 2) (12) (1) ( 21) T  T  T  T L L L L and the interaction between the inner shell and fluid is the () 2 (1) ( 2) term , which is where T and T are the kinetic energy terms owing L 2 H ( 2) I II to the interaction between the outer and inner shells with T   (  ) w b d x d L L 2 2 rb 2   0 Lh liquid, respectively. In addition, the kinetic energy terms,      (1 2) ( 21) 1 ~ ~ T and T indicate the interaction between the   b W W L L  L in js n1 s1 i1 j1 f 1 shells via liquid (Amabili et al. 1998).                    Θ                   Fluid-structure coupling of concentric double FGM shells with different lengths 237         The maximum potential energy of both of cylindrical    shells, Eq. (5), becomes  B I ( b) ( a)K ( b)  fsi s f f s f  K  s  U  U  U  Q KQ, (69) S S1 S 2  A I ( b) fsi s f 2 (65) H 2 with the partitioned matrix K, which is  cos( x)Θ ( x)dx cos(n ) cos(s )d f j   Lh 0 K  0   S1 1 ~ ~ K  , (70)  W OP W   0 K   S 2  where K and K are the stiffness matrixes of the outer S1 S2 and inner cylindrical shells, respectively, which are defined 2.4 Eigenvalue extraction in Appendix C. The symbol of [0] indicates a null matrix. The reference kinetic energy of both of the cylindrical For the numerical calculation of natural frequencies and shells, Eq. (21) can be rewritten as Ritz unknown coefficients, the limited expansion terms of admissible modal functions should be considered. So, N is    T T  T  T  Q MQ, (71) the number of expansion terms in the circumferential S S1 S 2 admissible modal functions for s and n. On the other hand, where the number M indicates the number of expansion terms in the axial admissible modal functions for m and k. The M  0  S1 M  , number of expansion terms N and M should be chosen large (72)   0 M   S 2  enough to give required accuracy. The vector Q of parameters in the Ritz expansion is defined as The sub-matrices, M and M in Eq. (72) are the mass S1 S2 matrices of the outer and inner shells respectively, which       are given in Appendix C. The simplified reference kinetic   ~     Q , q V , q  V (66)       ~ energy of fluid, Eq. (59), can be rewritten as      ~    W      T T   Q M Q, (73) L L where q and are the displacement vectors of the 2 container and baffle shells, respectively. The displacement where vectors are defined as follows 0 0 0 0 0 0   U V W         (1,1) (1,1) (1,1) 0 0 0 0 0 0                    0 0 OP  0 0 OS  1 1 M  ,       (74)   U V W L (1,M ) (1,M ) (1,M ) 0 0 0 0 0 0         U V W         ( 2,1) ( 2,1) ( 2,1) 0 0 0 0 0 0                               0 0 OS 0 0 OP   2 2  (67) U , V  , U       U V W ( 2,M ) ( 2,M ) ( 2,M )       Substituting Eqs. (69), (71) and (73) into the Rayleigh          quotient, Eq. (4), and then minimizing it with respect to the       coefficients Q , we obtain U V W i       ( N ,1) ( N ,1) ( N ,1)          KQ (M M ) Q 0, (75)             U V W ( N ,M ) ( N ,M ) ( N ,M )       which is a linear eigenvalue problem for a real, non- and similarly symmetric matrix. ~ ~ ~       U V W (1,1) (1,1) (1,1) 2.5 Coupled modes                ~ ~ ~       The coupling between the baffle and container occurs U V W (1,M ) (1,M ) (1,M )       only when they are vibrating in a same circumferential ~ ~ ~       U V W mode number, n. It can be realized with taking a look at the ( 2,1) ( 2,1) ( 2,1)       elements of the stiffness and the mass matrices, M, M and          ~   ~   ~   (68) U , V  , U K. This conclusion is very close to what was reported by       ~ ~ ~ U V W       ( 2,M ) ( 2,M ) ( 2,M ) Au-Yang (1975). It is worth noting that the greater the gap       between the cylindrical shells is, the less they observe          coupling effects as they vibrate in a same circumferential ~ ~ ~       U V W ( N ,1) ( N ,1) ( N ,1) mode number. If the gap is large enough, the shells are not                influenced by the hydrodynamic coupling. Once the shells       ~ ~ ~ are vibrating with different circumferential mode numbers, U V W       ( N ,M ) ( N ,M ) ( N ,M )       they vibrate independently. It means that they do not affect 238 Ehsan Moshkelgosha, Ehsan Askari, Kyeong-Hoon Jeong and Ali Akbar Shafiee each other via fluid. Actually, it can be assumed that one Table 2 Total number of elements used in the finite element shell vibrates whereas the other shell is not deformed. analysis (b=0.1 m) Number of elements a (S4R) (AC3D8) 3. Numerical result and discussion Outer shell Inner shell fluid A 0.11 5800 4350 39600 In this section, the characteristic equation of a B 0.2 7200 5400 56300 cylindrical fluid-storage tank with a flexible baffle are solved using a written MATLAB code. The material properties and geometry of the system are as follows; the baffle made of steel has Young’s modulus E=206 GPa, rigid inner shell on dynamic characteristics of the FGM Poisson’s ratio of ϑ=0.3, and mass density of ρ =7850 flexible cylindrical tank is also estimated as a function of kg/m . The liquid as water has depth of H=0.4 m, mass the baffle radius. The second considered case stresses on the density of ρ =1000 kg/m . Meanwhile, the container is dynamic analysis of a flexible steel-made baffle and a made of functionally graded materials, such as Al/ZrO and flexible FGM container with material properties listed in Al/Al O , and their material properties are indicated in Table 1. The effect of gradient indices on the first and 2 3 Table 1. The baffle has a radius of b=0.1 m, length of second natural frequencies of the fluid-coupled system for h=0.45 m, and wall thickness of t=0.002 m. The axial gap several circumferential modes is also investigated. between the baffle and container also is d=0.15 m. The Furthermore, the effect of the liquid depth on natural radius of container with a thickness of t=0.002 m is frequencies and the radius of the structures on the mode assumed to be a=0.11 m or 0.2 m with a length of 0.6 m. shapes of coupled system are studied. For all these For verification purposes, a finite element (FE) model of investigations, the verifications of the theoretical natural the fluid-coupled system is also constructed and obtained frequencies of the coupled system using the FEM analyses results are compared to those acquired by the semi- are also provided. analytical simulation presented in this study. In the FE analysis, the FGM container is modelled by considering a 3.1 Case 1: Flexible FGM container with a rigid baffle multi-layered composite as each layer has constant properties and a number of layers are chosen. They could Obstacles like baffles have been usually used in moving therefore be simulated correctly by changing FGM containers to suppress free surface waves. Considering the mechanical properties through thickness direction. A effect of baffles on the hydroelastic vibration and the commercial FEM code, ABAQUS (version 6.5) is used for sloshing phenomenon of containers is of paramount numerical analysis. In order to assure a high precision for importance during design process. The vibration modes of the finite element results, the container shell is divided into baffled containers can be categorized into two modes, 8 layers, Fig. 1. The structural model is constructed with a sloshing modes and bulging modes. Sloshing modes are quadrilateral shell element (S4R) which is a four-node, caused by the oscillation of the fluid free surface, whereas doubly curved shell element with a reduced integration, bulging modes are related to vibrations of the flexible hourglass control, and the finite membrane strain structures coupled with the liquid. Moreover, it is well formulation. The liquid region is meshed with acoustic known that the free surface waves negligibly affect bulging elements (AC3D8), which are eight-node brick acoustic modes of structures that are not extremely flexible. In the elements with a linear interpolation, and the element has present study, our attention is focused on the bulging modes only one unknown pressure per node (Virella et al. 2006). A of the liquid-coupled system. density ρ=1000 kg/m and a bulk modulus K=2.07 GPa, i.e., Tables 3 and 4 summarize natural frequencies of the the properties of water, are used in the computations. fluid-coupled structures shown in Fig. 1. As it can be Acoustic three-dimensional finite elements based on linear observed, the obtained results are in agreement with those wave theory are used to represent the hydrodynamics of of finite element analyses. In addition, it is illustrated that fluid. The location of each node on the constrained surfaces the rigid baffle with a radius of a=0.11 m affects natural of liquid coincides exactly to the location of corresponding frequencies of the tank much more than that with a=0.2 m. node of structure. Along the interface between liquid and it means that the narrower gap between the two structures, structure, the fluid surface is tied to the shell surface in the more reduction in the natural frequencies due to normal direction to satisfy compatibility conditions. This increasing the effect of fluid-structure interaction. contact formulation is based on the master-slave approach, Moreover, the fundamental modes of the system with these in which both surfaces remain in contact throughout two different radii of the container, a=0.11 and 0.2 m, simulation, allowing the transmission of normal forces corresponds to the first mode with the circumferential wave between them. As no pressure was applied to nodes at the number n=2 and 3, respectively. free fluid surface, no sloshing waves are considered in this The effect of the annular gap between the container and study. In addition, the number of elements used in the finite baffle on natural frequencies for the first and second axial element model is listed in Table 2. modes of the system is plotted in Figs. 2 and 3 as a function Two investigations are delineated in the section. First of of the radius of rigid baffle (b). It is illustrated that natural all, a functionally graded baffled container is taken into frequencies decrease as baffle radius increases with a sharp consideration. The baffle is assumed as a vertical cylindrical decrease as the gap is narrower regardless of mode rigid shell, which is submerged into liquid. The effect of numbers. Moreover, it can be observed that the influence of Model Fluid-structure coupling of concentric double FGM shells with different lengths 239 Table 3 Natural frequencies of the coupled system with the FGM container, Al/ZrO FEM FEM This study This study Mode (ABAQUS) (ABAQUS) 300 n,m a=0.11 a=0.2 1,1 200.74 205.08 381.03 376.00 1,2 2,1 102.53 99.44 197.07 193.37 2,2 438.06 430.27 632.61 615.80 3,1 169.47 163.15 126.16 125.04 3,2 374.99 369.12 419.27 409.25 4,1 289.13 281.35 147.36 143.25 4,2 543.89 536.24 330.26 324.10 5,1 477.02 469.61 210.47 202.39 0.1 0.11 0.12 0.13 0.14 0.15 0.16 0.17 0.18 0.19 0.2 5,2 727.83 714.27 347.00 336.32 Fig. 2 Effect of annular gap on natural frequencies of the fluid-coupled system with the fundamental axial mode, Table 4 Natural frequencies of the coupled system with the FGM container, Al/Al O m=1. (H=0.4 m) ( , n=1; , n=2; , 2 3 n=3; , n=4) FEM This study This study FEM (ABAQUS) Mode (ABAQUS) n,m a=0.11 a=0.2 1,1 250.48 243.46 478.99 472.03 1,2 2,1 124.91 121.99 248.86 239.54 2,2 564.87 557.23 814.71 800.25 3,1 213.24 209.04 155.84 152.41 3,2 482.42 476.33 541.79 534.94 4,1 373.39 376.07 182.17 176.27 4,2 705.23 690.41 428.35 413.89 5,1 614.2 602.55 269.57 261.03 5,2 451.52 440.19 0.1 0.11 0.12 0.13 0.14 0.15 0.16 0.17 0.18 0.19 0.2 the baffle radius on natural frequencies is relatively significant for lower circumferential mode numbers due to Fig. 3 Effect of the annular gap on natural frequencies of the separation effect (Askari and Jeong 2010). An increase the fluid-coupled system with the second axial mode, m=2. of circumferential modes produces nodal points along the (H=0.4 m) ( , n=1; , n=2; , n=3; periphery of shell, dividing the circumferential fluid flow , n=4) near the shell. At the same time, it reduces the active vibrating surface of the shell. Consequently, the effect of the liquid inertia on system dynamics decreases, which is called metal on the inside surface of the shell eliminates the abrupt a “separation effect”. transition between the thermal expansion coefficients, offers the thermal resistance and the corrosion protection, and 3.2 Case 2: Flexible FGM container with a flexible increases the load carrying capability. This is possible baffle because the material composition of an FGM changes gradually through the thickness. Therefore, stress Usually ceramic tiles have been utilized to laminate the concentrations due to an abrupt change in material outer part of cylindrical containers, protecting the container properties can be eliminated. from the erosion induced by an aggressive chemical Regarding to industrial applications, the dynamic environment. They also increase the thermal resistance of analyses of a baffled container made of FGMs were studied the container against a hight temperature of surroundings. employing the model developed within this work, together However, these tiles are prone to crack and to debond the with finite element method. Tables 5 and 6 listed natural shell/tile interface due to an abrupt tran sition between frequencies of the coupled system for two sets of material thermal expansion coefficients. In other words, a difference properties, Al/ZrO and Al/Al O , respectively, which in the thermal expansion of the materials causes stress 2 2 3 illustrated small discrepancies, comparing outcomes concentrations at the interface of the ceramic tiles and the acquired by semi-analytical method and finite element shell, which results in cracking or debonding. An FGM method. The effect of gradient indices on the two lowest composed of the ceramics on the outside surface and the Natural frequency Natural frequency 240 Ehsan Moshkelgosha, Ehsan Askari, Kyeong-Hoon Jeong and Ali Akbar Shafiee Table 5 Natural frequencies of the coupled system with the FGM container, Al/ZrO FEM FEM This study This study Mode (ABAQUS) (ABAQUS) n,m a=0.11 a=0.2 1,1 144.93 142.01 312.29 317.52 1,2 444.59 432.77 437.48 422.68 2,1 74.764 72.80 140.74 135.79 2,2 170.66 165.62 202.65 197.48 3,1 118.27 118.00 125.74 123.66 3,2 244.74 236.04 194.12 198.65 4,1 228.84 217.08 147.21 141.70 4,2 394.48 378.22 329.4 315.96 0 5 10 15 5,1 401.55 390.37 210.32 202.15 Gradient index 5,2 575.51 554.95 346.86 337.01 Fig. 4 Gradient index (α) effect with the material Al/Al O 2 3 on the natural frequencies of the fluid-coupled system for the first axial mode, m=1. (b=0.1 m) ( , n=1; Table 6 Natural frequencies of the coupled system with the FGM container, Al/Al O , n=2; , n=3; , n=4) 2 3 FEM FEM This study This study Mode (ABAQUS) (ABAQUS) n,m a=0.11 a=0.2 1,1 160.48 157.06 328.53 332.05 1,2 515.1 506.23 524.2 513.94 2,1 80.472 77.34 141.83 137.14 2,2 196.17 189.67 254.2 249.00 3,1 126.89 129.60 154.73 158.20 3,2 285.58 277.82 194.96 189.85 4,1 255.72 248.45 181.94 174.37 4,2 433.8 425.02 376.04 368.22 5,1 456.61 444.76 269.35 260.17 5,2 633.65 621.88 451.29 443.76 0 5 10 15 Gradient index natural frequencies was also investigated and illustrated in Fig. 5 Gradient index (α) effect with the material Al/Al O 2 3 Figs. 4 and 5 for Al/Al O and Figs. 6 and 7 for Al/ZrO . It on the natural frequencies of the fluid-coupled system for 2 3 2 could be observed from the figures that the natural the second axial mode, m=1. (b=0.1 m) ( , n=1; frequencies gradually decrease and converge to the certain , n=2; , n=3; , n=4) values as the gradient index increases. It can be explained that an increase of the gradient index indicates that the 260 dominant material properties of the container shell changes from the ceramic to Aluminum. When the gradient index, α is 0, the mechanical properties of the shell converge the ceramics’ properties, Al O or ZrO . When the gradient 2 3 2 index, α converges to infinite, the properties of the structure, however, approach that of Aluminium. Natural frequencies dominantly decrease as the gradient index is within the range of 0-5. It should be noted that the gradient indices affect the natural frequencies of Al/Al O shells 2 3 more than those of Al/ZrO shells. Figs. 8-11 show the first four mode shapes of liquid- coupled baffled container with radii of 0.11 and 0.2 m for n=3 and 4. It is worth mentioning that the normalized amplitude of the baffle is about the same as that of the 0 5 10 15 Gradient index container as the annular gap is a=0.11, showing a strong Fig. 6 Gradient index (α) effect with the material Al/ZrO interaction between two concentric shells, Figs. 8 and 9. on the natural frequencies of the fluid-coupled system for Furthermore, it can be observed some modes are the distinct the first axial mode, m=1. (b=0.1 m) ( , n=1; in-phases and the others are the distinct out -of-phases. , n=2; , n=3; , n=4) However, the normalized vibration amplitude of the baffle Natural frequency Natural frequency Natural frequency Fluid-structure coupling of concentric double FGM shells with different lengths 241 .6 0.6 .4 0.4 .2 0.2 0 0 -0.2 -0.1 0 0.1 0.2 -0.2 -0.1 0 0.1 0.2 (a) (b) .8 0.8 .6 0.6 .4 0.4 .2 0.2 0 0 -0.2 -0.1 0 0.1 0.2 -0.2 -0.1 0 0.1 0.2 (c) (d) 0 5 10 15 Gradient index Fig. 10 First four mode shapes of the baffled container for Fig. 7 Gradient index (α) effect with the material Al/ZrO n=3 and a=0.2 on the natural frequencies of the fluid-coupled system for the second axial mode, m=1. (b=0.1 m) ( , n=1; .6 0.6 , n=2; , n=3; , n=4) .4 0.4 6 0.6 .2 0.2 4 0.4 0 0 -0.2 -0.1 0 0.1 0.2 -0.2 -0.1 0 0.1 0.2 (a) (b) 2 0.2 .8 0.8 0 0 -0.2 -0.1 0 0.1 0.2 -0.2 -0.1 0 0.1 0.2 (a) (b) .6 0.6 8 0.8 .4 0.4 6 0.6 .2 0.2 4 0.4 0 0 -0.2 -0.1 0 0.1 0.2 -0.2 -0.1 0 0.1 0.2 (c) (d) 2 0.2 Fig. 11 First four mode shapes of the baffled container for 0 0 n=4 and a=0.2 -0.2 -0.1 0 0.1 0.2 -0.2 -0.1 0 0.1 0.2 (c) (d) Fig. 8 First four mode shapes of the baffled container for n=3 and a=0.11 independently comparing with the case with the narrower gap. 6 0.6 4 0.4 4. Conclusions 2 0.2 A semi-analytical method to study the coupled dynamics 0 0 -0.2 -0.1 0 0.1 0.2 -0.2 -0.1 0 0.1 0.2 of FGM containers with flexible baffles was developed (a) (b) taking fluid-structure interaction into account. Fundamental 8 0.8 frequencies and modes of the system were acquired using the Rayleigh quotient, the Galerkin method, the collocation 6 0.6 method and the superposition principle. The theoretical 4 0.4 model enabled us to assess vibration of concentric shells coupled via fluid. Furthermore, the effect of functionally- 2 0.2 graded materials on the fluid-coupled vibration of the 0 0 system was evaluated employing this methodology. -0.2 -0.1 0 0.1 0.2 -0.2 -0.1 0 0.1 0.2 (c) (d) It was concluded that fundamental frequencies of the Fig. 9 First four mode shapes of the baffled container for coupled system decrease as the baffle radius increases, that n=4, a=0.11 is, the radial gap decreases. In particular, a sharp reduce in frequencies was observed as the radial gap became narrower regardless of mode numbers. In addition, the differs from that of the container, for an annular gap of gradient index affected the system frequencies which a=0.20, due to a weak interaction between the structures via decreased and converged to the certain values. The natural the liquid, Figs. 10 and 11. That is to say, the shells move frequencies also decreased as the container fluid depth Natural frequency 242 Ehsan Moshkelgosha, Ehsan Askari, Kyeong-Hoon Jeong and Ali Akbar Shafiee Gavrilyuk, I., Lukovsky, I., Trotsenko, Y. and Timokh, A. (2006), raised. The first four mode shapes of the fluid-coupled “Sloshing in a vertical circular cylindrical tank with an annular system with a=0.11 and 0.2 for n=3 and 4 were also baffle. Part 1. Linear fundamental solutions”, J. Eng. Math., 54, presented. It was illustrated that the baffle and the container 71-88. vibrated with about similar normalized amplitude for Hasheminejad, S.M. and Rajabi, M. (2007), “Acoustic resonance narrower gaps such as 0.01 m, showing a strong interaction scattering from a submerged functionally graded cylindrical between the shells. According to mathematical formulation shell”, J. 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(1995), “Rayleigh-Ritz method in coupled fluid-structure “Equivalent mechanical model of liquid sloshing in multi- interacting systems and its applications”, J. Sound Vib., 186, baffled containers”, Eng. Anal. Bound. Elem., 47, 82-95. 543-550. Eftekhari, S.A. (2016), “Pressure-based and potential-based differential quadrature procedures for free vibration of circular plates in contact with fluid”, Latin Am. J. Solid. Struct., 13(4), CC 1-22. Fluid-structure coupling of concentric double FGM shells with different lengths 243 Appendix A: the unknown matrices in Eq. (46)  A  B  1sk 1sk     In this appendix, the unknown matrices in Eq. (46) are A   , B       sk sk     given in detail. Unknown matrices in Eq. (A1) are as (B.4) A B fsk fsk     follows x  ( j  1) , j  1, ,N Θ A Θ B Θ , j (A.1) 1 ni 2 ni 3 where x are selected as points used in the collocation Θ ( j, m) I ( b) method. Moreover, unknown matrices in Eq. (B.5) are as 1 n m jm follows    I ( a) n m R B  R A  R (B.5) Θ ( j, m) I ( b) K ( b)  1 sk 2 sk 3 2  n m n m  mj K ( a)  n m  in which sub-matrices on the boundary γ are as follows 2 K ( b) n m  I ( a)  (A.2) n f   H K ( a) R ( j, f ) I ( b) K ( b) n m 1 n f n f Θ ( j)     3 K ( a) n f H   m1     ( x) cos( x) d x    i m mj 0  cos( x )   (B.6) f j A B     R ( j, f ) I ( b) cos( x ), 1ni 1ni 2 n f f j     A   , B   .     ni ni R ( j) 0,       A B  m ni  m ni and on the boundary γ′ Unknown matrices in Eq. (A3) are also defined as follows    I ( a) n f P A  P B  P (A.3) 1 ni 2 ni 3   R ( j, f ) I ( b) K ( b) 1 n f n s   K ( a) n f   (B.7) P ( j, m) I ( b) , 1 n m mj  cos( x ) f j    I ( a) R ( j, f ) 0, R ( j) Λ (x ) n m 2 3 k j   P ( j, m) I ( b) K ( b)  2 n m n m mj   K ( a)  n m     I ( a) n m      I ( b) K ( b)  , n m n m mj (A.4)   K ( a) Appendix C: the stiffness and the mass matrices  n m   K ( b) K ( b)  n m n m P ( j)    3  mj mj In this appendix, the stiffness and the mass matrices of K ( a) K ( a) m1  n m n m  the container and the baffle are given in detail. The stiffness matrix of the baffle is given by   ( x) cos( x) d x, i m 11 12 13   K K K   21 22 23 K  K K K (C.1) S 2   31 32 33 Appendix B: the unknown matrices in Eq. (58).   K K K   kl In this appendix, the unknown matrices in Eq. (58) are where the elements of sub-matrices K ,(k,l=1,2,3) are given given in detail. Unknown matrices in Eq. (B1) are as by Eq. (C.2) follows   Λ A L  Λ 11 s i K  b d x Q A  Q B  Q S injs c (B.1) 2 2 1 sk 2 sk 3 L h   x x i j  Λ L  ns Λ s i Q ( j, f ) I ( b) cos( x ), Q ( j) 0, 1 d x , i, j  1, M 1 n f f j 3 L h 2b x x 2  I ( a)  n f in which (B.2)   cos(n ) cos(s ) d Q ( j, f )  I ( b) K ( b) c    2 n f n f K ( a)   (C.2) n f   2 and   sin( n ) sin( s ) d  cos( x ), on  f j   L A  Λ and 12 s i K  2n Λ d x injs  c j Lh 2 x   Q ( j, f )  I ( b) cos( x ), Q ( j, f )  0, 1 n f f j 2 (B.3) L Λ   Λ Q ( j)  Λ ( x ), on  j 3 k j 1s d x s  Lh x x 244 Ehsan Moshkelgosha, Ehsan Askari, Kyeong-Hoon Jeong and Ali Akbar Shafiee L A  L   A  Λ 13 s i s c i   K  Λ d x K   2n  d x 12  c j in js j injs 2 2   0 L h  2 x x i  (1 ) D L    22 s s j K  ( A b ) injs s 1s d x , 2 b x x L Λ L Λ ns D i c s d x (  A ) Λ Λ d x, s i j L   A   L h L h x x b b s c i     d x 13 j injs 2  L x n D s 23 c s K  ( A  ) Λ Λ d x injs s i j L  Lh 1 D   b b s i K   A a  d x   22 injs s s 2 a x x   L Λ (1 )s Λ s i D d x L ns  D  s c s Lh   A  d x,   s i j b x x 2  0 a a   2 2  L n  Λ n  s D  c i c s  Λ d x ,   K   A    d x j  2 23 injs s i j  2 Lh   b x a a   A  33 s c  L  D  K  Λ Λ d x s i injs i j  1s d x Lh s b  a x x  L  Λ  Λ i 2 D b d x    s c i 2 2 Lh n  d x , x x c j   2  0 x 2 2 2 s   Λ (ns)  c i c A s c  2 Λ d x  j K    dx  2 3 33 i j Lh injs b x b L L Λ  2 2 2 1 Λ j  i L  L  s  i i Λ Λ d x 2ns d x i j s  D a d x 2  d x    s c c j Lh L h  2 2 2 b x x 0 0 x x a x The mass matrix of the baffle is given by L L   (ns)  1  c i   d x 2ns d x i j s  3   0 0 a a x x   M 0 0   The mass matrix of the container is written M  0 M 0 (C.3) S 2     0 0 M M  0 0       M  0 M  0 , (C.7) kk S1 22   where the elements of sub-matrices M ,(k=1,2,3) are given   0 0 M  by  33  L Λ where the elements of sub-matrices [M ], (i=1,2,3) are 1 Λ j ii 11 i M  b t  d x, injs s 2 c given by Lh   x x i j (C.4) L   22 33 i M   a t d x, M  M  b t  Λ ( x)Λ ( x) d x, injs injs s 2 c i j 11 in js s 1 c   Lh 0  x x i j (C.8) i, j  1 M L M  M   a t  ( x) ( x) d x 22 33 s 1 c i j in js in js The partitioned stiffness matrix K associated with the S1 container is written as follows   K  K  K  11 12 13   K  K  K  K  , (C.5)   S1 12 22 23 T T   K  K  K  13 23 33   where the elements of sub-matrices [K ], (i,j=1,2,3) are ij given by Eq. (C.6)    A  L   s c i K   a d x 11 injs 2 2   x x i j  (C.6) L    ns 1 d x , 2a x x

Journal

Condensed MatterarXiv (Cornell University)

Published: May 2, 2019

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